Podchaser Logo
Home

Best Neuroscience Podcasts

Filter By

Podcast Details

Categories
Active Status
Language
Date of First Episode

***Internal Testing Only

    Search this list...
    Search this list...
    42 podcast results

    Join neuroscientist, philosopher, and five-time New York Times best-selling author Sam Harris as he explores important and controversial questions about the mind, society, current events, moral philosophy, religion, and rationality—with an overarching focus on how a growing understanding of ourselves and the world is changing our sense of how we should live. Sam is also the creator of the Waking Up app. Combining Sam’s decades of mindfulness practice, profound wisdom from varied philosophical and contemplative traditions, and a commitment to a secular, scientific worldview, Waking Up is a resource for anyone interested in living a more examined, fulfilling life—and a new operating system for the mind. Waking Up offers free subscriptions to anyone who can’t afford one, and donates a minimum of 10% of profits to the most effective charities around the world. To learn more, please go to WakingUp.com. Sam Harris received a degree in philosophy from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from UCLA.

    125 Ratings

    Two Austin therapists and their world-recognized guest experts break down modern attachment, relational neuroscience and trauma in a challenging but entertaining format designed to keep you off unconscious autopilot and moving towards closer connections.Find us at https://therapistuncensored.com

    3 Ratings

    Brain Science is hosted by Virginia "Ginger" Campbell, MD (Podcast Hall of Fame 2022). She is an experienced physician with a passion for exploring how recent discoveries in neuroscience are revealing how our brains make us who we are. This podcast is for non-scientists, scientists, and everyone in between. It features interviews and discusses the latest books about the brain.

    3 Ratings

    The Ask Your Mentor Podcast from Dementia Researcher and Alzheimer's Research UK. In this show mentees interview their mentors, discussing their careers, decisions they made along the way, triumphs and mistakes - sharing their lessons and top-tips to have a successful career in dementia research.Mentoring helps mentees tap into the knowledge of those with more experience to learn faster than they would on their own - and in this podcast we hope the experiences of the mentors can help our audience grow and develop as independant researchers.https://www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk

    1 Rating

    Open your mind with Naked Neuroscience, the spine-tingling, interactive monthly exploration of the workings of the nervous system from the Naked Scientists.

    1 Rating

    Clinical neurology with KD is a podcast hosted by Dr Krishnadas N C, Senior consultant neurologist at Meitra Hospital, Kerala, India, a National Board Neurology teaching Institute. It is one of the top 10 International neurology podcasts, according to Feedspot. Dr Krishnadas has over 15 years of experience in teaching medical students. In this podcast, he will discuss how to localise a lesion in neurology based on history taking and physical examination. The podcast is meant for medical students and makes them enjoy learning neurology. Medicine, paediatrics, critical care, psychiatry, neurology residents, general practitioners and nurse practitioners will also benefit. Notes, images and other resources for the podcast are available at the website neurologyteachingclub.com.

    1 Rating

    Become a Paid Subscriber: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/neuroscienceofeverything/subscribeLearn Neuroscience of day-to-day things in a fun and entertaining way 🧠We release interactive, easy-to-understand monthly podcast episodes featuring eminent neuroscientists, psychologists, and productivity coaches. Our guests provide neuroscience-backed practical tips to optimize your work and life. If you like what we do and want to support us, consider donating at https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/Nandmuley009🇨🇭 Proudly made in Switzerland 🇨🇭

    1 Rating

    UX Magazine presents the Invisible Machines podcast.Conversational AI is going everywhere. Join great weekly conversations with experts in a podcast about conversational AI and hyperautomation, covering the intersection of UX, business, technology and design.Robb Wilson and Josh Tyson, authors of Age Of Invisible Machines, the first bestselling book about conversational AI, envisioned the moment we’re in with ChatGPT and the AI revolution. Join weekly as they continue their discussion with leading thinkers and doers.

    1 Rating

    Greater Good Articles, Videos and Podcasts

    0 Ratings

    Tap into weekly interviews and insights that join the dots between brain science and business, learning and life. I'm your host, Deirdre Morrison. I'll be discussing brain-based neuroscience concepts and hacks, and bringing you insights from almost two decades in business, as well as interviews with professionals whose expertise can increase our understanding of the things we can do to stay on top of our game without falling victim to the rat race.

    0 Ratings

    Supported by a grant from the Wellcome Trust to Dr Tilli Tansey and Professor Leslie Iversen, the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL presents a series of podcasts on the history of neuroscience featuring eminent people in the field:Professor Sir Michael Rutter was born in 1933 and trained in general medicine, neurology and paediatrics before specialising in psychiatry. He was appointed the first consultant of child psychiatry in the UK and has been Head of the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, London, and Honorary Director of the Medical Research Council Child Psychiatry Unit.His studies of autism, depression, antisocial behaviour, reading difficulties, deprived children, overactive children, school effectiveness and children whose psychiatric problems have a clear organic component has resulted in many publications. One of the most influential was Maternal Deprivation Reassessed (1972) in which he argued (against John Bowlby) that it was the norm for children to form multiple attachments rather than a selective attachment with just one person. Professor Rutter is recognised as contributing to the establishment of child psychiatry as a medical and biopsychosocial specialty with a strong scientific base. In 1994 he set up the Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Unit at the Institute of Psychiatry. The goal of the Centre is to bridge the gap between ‘nature’ (genetics) and ‘nurture’ (environment) as they interact in the development of complex human behaviour, such as depression and Attention Deficity Hyperactivity Disorder in children.Professor Rutter was knighted in 1992 and is an honorary member of the British Academy, a Fellow of the Royal Society, and founding Fellow of the Academia Europaea and the Academy of Medical Sciences. The Michael Rutter Centre for Children and Adolescents at the Maudsley Hospital, London, is named after him.

    0 Ratings

    Spring 2012 - UCL's Lunch Hour Lecture Series is an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at the university, in bite-size chunks. Speakers are drawn from across UCL and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications. Lunch Hour Lectures require no pre-booking, are free to attend and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.

    0 Ratings

    There are many myths surrounding British Sign Language (BSL) – the third most widely used indigenous language in the UK. In this lecture, Professor Woll will try to dispel some of them by introducing BSL, explaining how it works and exploring the community it has created.

    0 Ratings

    Read-Right is a therapy and research application accessed over the internet. It has been developed by UCL Institute of Neurology and UCL Multimedia. The project is funded by The Stroke Association. The aims of the project are twofold: 1) to provide a web-based therapy for patients with hemianopic alexia (HA); 2) to find out if the therapy works over the internet. To do this, we need to collect information from users to see if they are improving with practice.

    0 Ratings

    Dr Brad Duchaine talks about a World Without Facial Recognition

    0 Ratings

    Spring 2011 - UCL's Lunch Hour Lecture Series is an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at the university, in bite-size chunks. Speakers are drawn from across UCL and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications. Lunch Hour Lectures require no pre-booking, are free to attend and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.

    0 Ratings

    Supported by a grant from the Wellcome Trust to Dr Tilli Tansey and Professor Leslie Iversen, the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL presents a series of podcasts on the history of neuroscience featuring eminent people in the field:Professor Uta Frith was born on 25th May 1941 in Germany. She completed her undergraduate degree in experimental psychology at the Universitaet des Saarlandes before training in clinical psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. She completed her PhD on autism in 1968.Professor Uta Frith is best known for her research on autism spectrum disorders. Her book, Autism, Explaining the Enigma (1989) has been translated into many languages. She was one of the initiators of the study of Asperger's Syndrome in the UK and her work on reading development, spelling and dyslexia has been highly influential. Frith’s work on theory of mind in autism proposes the idea that people with autism have specific difficulties understanding other people’s beliefs and desires. Much of this work was carried out with Simon Baron-Cohen who was her PhD student. She has also suggested that individuals with autism have ‘weak central coherence’, and are better than typical individuals at processing details but worse at integrating information from many different sources.Throughout her career she has been developing a neuro-cognitive approach to developmental disorders. In particular, she has investigated specific cognitive processes and their failure in autism and dyslexia. Her aim is to discover the underlying cognitive causes of these disorders and to link them to behavioural symptoms as well as to brain systems. She aims to make this research relevant to the education of people with development disorders and to contribute to a better quality of their everyday life.Professor Frith is a Fellow of the Royal Society, the British Academy and the Academy of Medical Sciences. She is Emeritus Professor of Cognitive Development at University College London and Research Foundation Professor at the Faculties of Humanities and Health Sciences, University of Aarhus, Denmark.

    0 Ratings

    What is Fugues? The quick answer - it’s The Moth with neuroscience and music (and a bit of sci-fi...)The detailed answer - a fugue, conventionally, is:(1) a piece of music with multiple melodies played at the same time and...(2) a trance state where a person experiences amnesia, and loses their sense of self.Both uses of the word have a beginning, middle and end. Taking a bit of license, each story we tell in this podcast will be called a fugue. And each fugue will illustrate a handful of mental ingredients. A fugue will also refer to any temporary mental state one is in. For example, you are currently in a podcast description-reading fugue.Hosted by Gabriel Berezin, some fugues will be autobiographical, others will come from special guests, and others may be...science-fictional.

    0 Ratings

    In-depth yet accessible interviews with world-leading neuroscientists, exploring cutting edge techniques, challenges in the field, and how these researchers think not only about the brain but life in general. The conversations are accessible to anyone with an interest in science. CortexCast is the official podcast of the Oxford University Cortex Club, a student run society that connects local and internationally recognised neuroscientists with students and researchers in Oxford through forums such as panels discussions, lectures and small debates. If you are interested in Cortex then this is the 'cast for you.

    0 Ratings

    Conversations about the science of a meaningful life, from UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center. Leading researchers and thinkers explore the roots of compassion, happiness, morality, and more. Provocative, enlightening, and inspiring.

    0 Ratings

    Educator Aide, Inc. is committed to supporting individuals and organizations on their journey of self-aware leadership, emotional wellness, and development of effective cross-cultural communication through exploration of the following topics: communication, culture, cultural intelligence, workplace culture, cultural psychology, cultural neuroscience, diversity, emotional intelligence, equity, inclusion, motivation, inspiration, insight, and leadership. Sponsored by EducatorAide® - Visit www.educatoraide.com to learn more. Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/educatoraide/support

    0 Ratings

    Professor Geoffrey Burnstock was born in London in 1929 and studied theology, maths and physics at King’s College London, before completing a PhD at King’s and University College London (1957) under the supervision of the neurophysiologist, JZ Young. Between 1959 and 1975, Professor Burnstock worked at the University of Melbourne, beginning with a senior lectureship in zoology. Most of his major research has been on the autonomic nervous system, notably autonomic neurotransmission and he is best known for his discovery that ATP is a transmitter in NANC (non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic) nerves and also for the discovery and definition of P2 purinergic receptors, their signaling pathways and functional relevance. Professor Burnstock’s work in this area has had an impact on the understanding of pain mechanisms, incontinence, embryological development, bone formation and resorption, and on skin, prostate and bladder cancer.Professor Burnstock returned to London in 1975, becoming Head of Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology at University College London and Convenor of the Centre of Neuroscience. He has served as editor-in-chief of the journals Autonomic Neuroscience and Purinergic Signalling and has been on the editorial boards of many other journals. He has been elected to the Australian Academy of Science (1971, the Royal Society (1986) and the Academy of Medical Sciences (1998), and was awarded the Royal Society Gold Medal (2000). He was President (1995-2000) of the International Society for Autonomic Neuroscience (ISAN), and was first in the Institute of Scientific Information list (1994-2004) of most cited scientists in Pharmacology and Toxicology.

    0 Ratings

    Supported by a grant from the Wellcome Trust to Dr Tilli Tansey and Professor Leslie Iversen, the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL presents a series of podcasts on the history of neuroscience featuring eminent people in the field:Professor Richard Gregory was born in London on 24 July 1923 and studied at the University of Cambridge before undertaking research at the Medical Research Council’s Applied Psychology Unit, Cambridge. A turning point in Professor Gregory’s work and ideas came during the investigation of a man who had been blind from birth but whose sight was restored at the age of 52. Studying the development of his perception changed the way in which he came to think of visual perception and its close relationship to touch.Most of Professor Gregory’s work has focused on visual perception and also on artificial intelligence. In 1967 he founded the Department of Machine Intelligence and Perception at the University of Edinburgh with Professor Donald Michie and Professor Christopher Longuet-Higgins. Gregory’s popular and influential book, Eye and Brain (1966), was the first to explore the psychology of seeing. He is particularly interested in optical illusions and what these reveal about human perceptions and in 1972 founded the journal Perception. In 1978, he established the Exploratory, a hands-on science centre in Bristol and the first of its kind in the UK. He was a founding member of the Experimental Psychology Society and served as its president in 1981-82.He has been awarded the Waverley Gold Medal for inventing the Solid-Image Microscope (1960), the Hughlings Jackson Gold Medal from the Royal Society of Medicine (1999), and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of London (1992). Professor Gregory is Emeritus Professor of Neuropsychology at the University of Bristol.

    0 Ratings

    Spring 2011 - UCL's Lunch Hour Lecture Series is an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at the university, in bite-size chunks. Speakers are drawn from across UCL and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications. Lunch Hour Lectures require no pre-booking, are free to attend and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.

    0 Ratings

    Dr Ann Silver studied physiology at Edinburgh University where she completed a PhD (1960) as an external student whilst carrying out research at the Agricultural Research Council Institute of Animal Physiology at Babraham, Cambridgeshire. Her research involved electrophysiological studies of nerve fibres exposed to organophosphorous compounds and also the transport of choline acetyltransferase down nerves.Dr Silver’s book, Biology of Cholinesterases (1974), was an important source of information, ideas and inspiration for a generation of cholinesterase researchers. She later laid the foundations for the ‘cholinergic hypothesis’ of Alzheimer’s disease, which led to the development of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors to treat it. She has been ethical editor on the Journal of Physiology and was involved in drafting the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, which regulates the ways in which animal experimentation is conducted in the UK.

    0 Ratings
    Previous

    Unlock more with Podchaser Pro

    • Audience Insights
    • Contact Information
    • Demographics
    • Charts
    • Sponsor History
    • and More!
    Pro Features
    Cookies!Cookie

    We use cookies to provide and improve our services. By using our site, you consent to cookies. Learn more