A multiple-time Boston Marathon qualifier and competitive Master’s athlete, Claire started running simply to get in shape for her high school reunion. The reunion came and went and she kept running. Claire finished her first marathon at age 38 in a respectable 4:02 and was immediately hooked. She became a student of the marathon using Jeff Gaudette’s training philosophy and RunnersConnect coaching. In less than four years, she successfully shaved over 30 minutes off her half marathon time and lowered her marathon PR to 2:58, remarkably without injury. “Running has changed my life and RunnersConnect coaching has made all the difference in my success. As a coach, I am passionate about sharing the tools and techniques I have learned at Runners Connect to help our athletes reach goals they never thought possible.”
How do you fuel for a relay race when your legs are going to be hours apart? What are some other tips and tricks you can utilize to make sure you're at your best for all of your legs?
The Relatable, Rambling Runner - Matt Chittim Most running podcasts focus on professional runners. Matt Chittim’s Rambling Runner podcast focuses on dedicated amateur runners who are working hard at the sport while also balancing running with the rest of their lives.  That’s not to say Matt ignores the elites. He also covers the other end of the spectrum with his Road to the Trials podcast which follows the training, racing, and experiences of some of America’s best runners as they prepared for the Olympic Trials. As an athlete, Matt is a former college basketball player and coach. He started running at a young age with an occasional 5k or track season but most of his running was at the service of getting fit for other sports. After college Matt started taking running more seriously and eventually became fully invested in the running community.  Matt is currently working through a year-long journey called Mastering 40 in which he is hoping to break 40:00 in the 10k after turning 40 years old. He talks to Coach Claire about his training ups and downs and what motivated him to set this “stretch goal.” Matt also talks about how his Ramblin Runner podcast got started, his most memorable interview, and what he thinks the differences are between professional and amateur runners. He is a natural storyteller who brings a unique perspective to the running community!   Questions Matt is asked:  3:50 Most of us know you from your popular running podcast Rambling Runner. Can we go back to the beginning of how it all got started and how it's going now?   8:10 What do you attribute the growth of your podcast to?   9:32 What have been some of your most memorable interviews?     11:05 Who is still on your list of dream interviews?   13:28 You’ve got another show, Road to the Trials, which obviously interviews the best of the best, the elite Americans who are gunning for the Olympic Trials, so you have interviewed your share of elites and you’ve interviewed your share of just recreational runners. What would you say is the difference between the two?   15:54 PTs probably love working with professional runners because they do what they’re told more than amateur runners do.   18:38 You have a new series within your podcast called Mastering 40 that you started last August, dedicated to chronicling your journey of breaking 40 minutes in the 10k. Let's talk about that and what you are doing to prepare.   21:29 How’s your Mastering 40 goal going?   22:21 How did you injure your knee and how did it affect your training goal?   23:07 Do you have a date for your goal? When’s the time trial?   24:26 What kind of races are you looking for to prepare for your time trial?   25:19 What are all the other things you’re doing? What's training like?  Nutrition, sleep, all that good stuff, etc? How are you doing in those areas?   29:28 Another project of yours is Road to the Trials.  Can you talk about that and who you bring on the show?     32:33 We could talk about how great such and such race was but you really learn so much more when everything falls apart.   36:54 What's next for you?  What happens when you break 40? Questions I ask everyone:   40:01 If you could go back and talk to yourself when you started running, what advice would you give?   40:46 What is the greatest gift running has given you?   41:00 Where can listeners connect with you?   Quotes by Matt:   “I started the Rambling Runner podcast with the idea of there’s a lot of running podcasts out there that I really liked and the vast majority of them were talking to professional runners... and I was like, ‘All right, no one’s talking to amateur runners. Let’s do that.’”   “Professional athletes in any sport are incredibly gifted athletes, and I think that the thing that’s easy to miss sometimes for dedicated amateur runners is sometimes they hold themselves to too high a standard. These folks, they were awesome at running the minute they started running.”   “One of the things I’ve learned through the show is that just like anything else, racing is a skill. It’s not just a test of fitness.”   Take a Listen on Your Next Run   Leave a space for libsyn link   Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel Mentioned in this podcast: The Rambling Runner podcast Road to the Trial‪s podcast Amino Co - RunnersConnect Anchor - The easiest way to make a podcast InsideTracker.com Runners Connect Winner's Circle Facebook Community  RunnersConnect Facebook page RunnersConnect Retreats email Coach Claire   Follow Matt on: Instagram Twitter We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top. The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use. The more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, the more I can reach out to and get top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!
As runners, we think about how to fuel properly. That includes carbohydrate and protein, but what about essential amino acids? How do they help us optimize our nutrition to become the best runners we can be? Dr. Robert Wolfe, Ph.D, is here to talk as both a scientist and a runner. As the director of the Center for Translational Research on Aging and Longevity at the University of Arkansas, he focuses his research on the regulation of muscle metabolism. His research publications have been cited an impressive 75,000+ times, and he shares how amino acids might be able to help your performance and recovery. Dr. Wolfe has also been running for 60 years and has run an amazing 62 marathons under 2:30 in his lifetime! Coach Claire talks to him about his running career, how to stay young and healthy, what happens in the body when we run, and how our food can help us before, during, and after the run.  Dr. Wolfe also shares his thoughts on the importance of keeping a consistent exercise routine as we age, so there’s definitely a lot of great food for thought in this episode!   Dr. Wolfe’s undergraduate studies were at the University of California, Berkeley, and he completed his Ph.D. degree at UC Santa Barbara’s Institute of Environmental Stress. Dr. Wolfe served as a faculty member at Harvard Medical School for nine years. Prior to accepting his current position in 2006, he was at the UT Medical Branch at Galveston, where he held the John H. Sealy Distinguished Chair in Clinical Research and was Chief of the Metabolism Unit at Shriners Burns Hospital.  Dr. Wolfe has received a number of awards and invited lectureships in recognition of his work. He received the Herman Award from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition for his career contributions. He has published over 452 peer-reviewed research articles, 126  review articles, three books, including the major reference source in the field of stable isotope tracer methodology and has 5 patents. His papers have been cited 50,663 times (h index= 122), and 16,423 (h index =65) since 2011. Dr. Wolfe has been funded continuously by the NIH for his entire career and frequently held two NIH grants per year as Pl. The focus of Dr. Wolfe’s research is on the regulation of muscle metabolism, particularly as affected by aging and stressors such as injury, sepsis and cancer. His research has been performed largely in human patients and normal volunteers. Dr. Wolfe has developed models using stable isotopes to quantify a variety of metabolic processes in human subjects including the oxidation and production of fatty acids, various aspects of carbohydrate metabolism, and the rates of muscle protein synthesis, breakdown, and the transport of amino acids between blood and muscle tissue. Dr. Wolfe is the Director of the Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity at the Reynolds Institute on Aging.   Questions Bob is asked:    3:33 Before we talk about the science of exercise metabolism, I want to hear about your running journey. You’ve been a runner for over 50 years with 62 marathons under 2:30. Can you tell us a little bit about what your story is and how you started?   5:15 I can’t imagine that every single run was super fun, so I would love to talk about what your training was like, how you trained for marathons and what are the key ingredients in the recipe for a marathon?   8:06 How old were you when you did your last sub-2:30 marathon?   8:59 As far as fueling goes, what does an endurance athlete need before, during, and after exercise?   12:09 What are amino acids?  What are the different kinds (essential, branched chain, etc)? And how are they used in the body?   14:56 When we’re eating enough dietary protein, does that mean we are automatically eating enough of the essential amino acids that we need?   16:53 What is the optimal amount of essential amino acids we as individuals need?   18:44 Obviously protein requirements are going to be different for an endurance runner and a bodybuilder, right?   22:51 Is the purpose of taking amino acid supplements to get everything you need for optimum performance without having to eat more food?   25:24 Is there a limit to how much amino acids the body can absorb at one?   27:55 Does the body have a way of storing essential amino acids?   29:22 If you take in too much essential amino acids, do you just excrete it?   29:44 How are the amino acids from the Amino Company produced?   32:09 How do you use amino acid supplements? Do you take it before your run, after, or even during?   36:40 When you are taking amino acids during exercise, do they activate hormones in your body?   41:00 Does your company have an amino acid formulation to help me with my insomnia too?   41:41 Besides leading the Amino Company, you are also the director of the center for translational research on aging and longevity at the University of Arkansas. So what's the secret to staying youthful and vital as we age?     43:39 Do older athletes have an advantage when it comes to longevity and aging?   Questions I ask everyone:   45:32 If you could go back and talk to yourself when you started running, what advice would you give?   47:02 What is the greatest gift running has given you?   47:54 Where can listeners connect with you?   Quotes by Bob:   “Generally speaking, I think the protein aspect of the diet is extremely important but as far as dietary protein, when you’re eating as many as 4 or 5,000 calories a day, even a low protein diet is going to provide enough dietary protein to meet your protein requirements.”    “It’s important to understand that the dietary requirements are telling us not only how much protein we should eat, but how much of each individual essential amino acid we should eat, are predicated on the baseline amount we need to avoid deficiency. And so the key aspect, what we’ll talk about with specific amino acid supplementation, is that for optimal physical functioning, particularly with stress like exercise training, that the baseline amount of essential amino acids that you need to avoid deficiency is really not optimal.”   “One of the things that obviously we’re trying to do is with running is to improve muscle function and muscle strength without increasing muscle bulk because it’s just extra weight.”   “The thing which is obvious when you see a lot of older people is that ability to function physically is really the primary determinant of quality of life. If you can’t get up out of a chair then medical costs and everything else go out the window, but just being able to do the activities you like is so important.” Take a Listen on Your Next Run   Leave a space for libsyn link   Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel Mentioned in this podcast: The Amino Company The Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity | UAMS Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging Runners Connect Winner's Circle Facebook Community  RunnersConnect Facebook page RunnersConnect Retreats Email Coach Claire   Follow Bob on: Email Dr. Wolfe We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top. The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use. The more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, the more I can reach out to and get top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!
If you’re listening to this while running, how’s your run going? Hopefully it’s a beautiful day and your run feels fantastic. But what if it’s not? What if your run feels hard, so hard you just want to quit? How do you motivate yourself to keep running? And how do you use these mental challenges both in running and in the rest of your life to become stronger? Dr. Jacob Cooper has the answers. Jacob breaks down exactly what you need to do and exactly when you need to do it, to convert your self-talk that’s telling you to quit, to an ally that lets the real you triumph. So if you want to perform better at running, or really at anything in life that's challenging, keep listening and be ready to apply Dr Cooper's techniques. Jacob is a clinical sport psychologist who serves as the director of sport psychology at Appalachian State University in Western North Carolina. A former college athlete himself, he has worked with professional and amateur athletes, Olympians, and Paralympians.  He has an extensive background in mental health and how it ties to performance.  Jacob has developed a style of working with athletes that focuses on them holistically, with the goal of performance optimization in the pursuit of excellence.    Jacob Cooper Ph.D. - Full Bio Dr. Cooper is a clinical sport psychologist who serves as the director of sport psychology at Appalachian State University in addition to his own private practice serving professional and amateur athletes. He is a member of the United States Olympic & Paralympic athlete mental health registry, which consists of a selected group of specialized sports psychologists who are thoroughly vetted by the USOPC and then made available to current U.S. Olympians & Paralympians. As a former collegiate offensive lineman turned amateur triathlete and runner (Hello Clydesdale Division!), Jacob has worked with athletes at the Olympic, Professional, and Division-1 level over the course of his career. As a sport psychologist, Dr. Cooper brings an extensive background in mental health and performance enhancement. To this end, he has developed a style of working with athletes that focuses on them holistically, across the spectrum of future-oriented performance optimization, current personal barriers/stressors, as well as more significant mental health issues that can inevitably show up in the pursuit of excellence.  As a doctoral student at Boston University, he completed clinical practicums within a variety of settings, including the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the Federal Bureau of Prisons system (BOP) along with multiple D1 college sport medicine teams as a performance consultant. Additionally, he has published scholarly articles and cultivated a unique approach to working with athletes and teams that integrates the latest research, evidence-based strategies, and technology to help them reach their goals.  In addition to high performance populations, he has a unique background and training in the areas of rural mental health, trauma recovery, serving low help-seeking populations, and military psychology. He has provided performance optimization for military personnel prior to their deployments as well as counseling for veterans transitioning back to civilian life throughout Western North Carolina, Indiana, and Boston.  Dr. Jacob Cooper- Ph.D. Clinical Sport Psychologist.  Director of Sport Psychology Services at Appalachian State University Licensed Clinical Psychologist & Health Service Provider (HSP) U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Sport Psychology Registry Member   Education Background: B.A.- (Psychology) Taylor University (Indiana)- 4 year scholarship athlete & team captain (Football) Dual Masters Degree- Ball State University (Indiana) M.S.- Sport and Performance Psychology M.A.- Clinical Psychology PhD- Counseling Psychology (Sport and Performance Track)- Boston University Matched Clinical Residency - Charles George Veterans Hospital - Asheville North Carolina.  Questions Jacob is asked:    3:59 I first found out about you from an Instagram post that the folks at ZAP posted. You were working with the elites at ZAP helping them build some mental strength. Can you tell me a little bit about how you worked with them?   5:03 How do elite and regular runners find motivation and purpose when a lot of races have been taken off the board?   6:19 Maybe this pandemic is a silver lining or maybe it’s a gift because we can look at our running in a different way because we’re all going to get slower as we age and performance is a huge part of why we do it, at least for some people, but once you take those PRs and the clock away, why do we run? That’s got to be the most important thing, right?   7:28 We always talk about, “I want to get mentally tough,” because clearly it’s not just our bodies. We can train our bodies to do certain things but if the brain is not onboard, the train’s not going to get all the way to the station. So how do we train our brain to be mentally tougher when things get hard?   8:30 I’m going to use myself as an example. When I’m running really hard or trying for a specific goal, I have the devil and the angel on my shoulder. I have the voice saying, “Go, go, go. You can do this.” And then I have a very, very sweet devil saying, “Everybody still loves you no matter what you run. You can slow down. This is really hard.” So I’m fighting these two opposing things that are 100% me and I really want to tell the devil to shut up and I really want to keep moving hard. How do I do that?   11:30 So the feelings come and we’re supposed to say, “Oh hello, feeling,” and let it go on its way. Is that what we’re supposed to be doing when we’re trying to run that 400 meter repeat really hard?   12:43 Can you give us a few examples of mental tools that we can use? What’s in the toolbox?   14:37 What is radical acceptance in your RISE model?   16:32 What does the I in RISE mean?   23:50 What does the S in RISE mean?   25:23 Do you have any hints for people who don’t know what their optimal performance cues are?   26:18 When I’m running well in a race or in a group setting, I definitely lock on the dude in front of me. I’m laser focused on him and I pretend that I have a rope attached to him and I pretend that he’s pulling me. And I just link up to him like a train like I am not letting this person go. It works for me.   27:13 What does the E in RISE stand for?   29:06 Let’s talk about the difference between psychology of teams and the psychology of athletes that are in an individual sport. Can you address that a little bit? Or is it the same just on a different level? Are we all talking to ourselves like we would talk to a bunch of people?   31:58 What about teams of runners? What about groups of runners where they’re obviously not always running the same races but they train together? They are in a team environment where they eat, sleep, and work out together and it’s been proven that we work differently in a group setting. Can you talk about that?   33:31 Especially with the pandemic, we’re seeing more and more runners find support, find a tribe, find a group of people online that they haven’t been able to find before, and a lot of people are finding it incredibly helpful. Especially runners are typically Type A, loner, data nerds (or maybe I'm just speaking for myself!), but a group setting isn’t typically comfortable for people who love to spend hours alone running, so any advice for that lone runner who maybe shies away from a group?   35:48 You help athletes work on their mental health issues. And we think about elite runners especially as just having these super tough brains that are as tough as their bodies and they are able to do amazing things that the regular people can’t do. So we think that they are just some kind of machine when it comes to their minds but I suspect that you find some mental health issues. Can you talk a little bit about that?   39:36 People who drive themselves so hard to be excellent, they’re a specific breed of people and you look at them and you wonder if they did have some trauma. Why in the world are they pushing themselves to these extreme limits? Do you find that that is really the case that people that are just absolutely at the top of their game are more likely to have had some kind of trauma in their past?   41:58 One thing I really wanted to talk to you about is the whole concept of balance. When we are striving for something, whether it's athletics, a career, parenting, sacrifice is inevitable and balance is simply not possible (or desired).  How can we reach our goals without letting everything else fall apart?   45:21 What is next for you and what questions in sports psychology are you looking to get answered in the future?   Questions I ask everyone:   48:54 If you could go back and talk to yourself when you started running, what advice would you give?   50:04 What is the greatest gift running has given you?   51:33 Where can listeners connect with you?   Quotes by Jacob:   “That ‘why’ is such a valuable thing and it’s very easy in athletics to sometimes lose touch with that.”   “I think that it’s helpful to have multiple fuel sources because there’s costs to them all.”   “Your attention is a muscle. It’s like a spotlight that allows you to shift to what matters most right now. I call these optimal performance cues or OPCs.”   “Anywhere that there’s pressure and stress, we’re all capable of that impacting us and manifesting in the form of some level of mental distress whether it’s just some symptoms of anxiety, depression, eating disorders, trauma, or it’s like a full blown chronic disorder and something like that.”   “There’s going to be times and seasons of life that feel unbalanced. But I believe that in every season of life it is possible and worthwhile to live in a way that reflects our values.” Take a Listen on Your Next Run   Leave a space for libsyn link   Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel Mentioned in this podcast: ZAP Endurance Runners Connect Winner's Circle Facebook Community  RunnersConnect Facebook page RunnersConnect Focus Classes email Coach Claire   Follow Jacob on: dr.coopercc@gmail.com Instagram Running with Heart We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top. The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use. The more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, the more I can reach out to and get top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!
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Creator Details

Location
Asheville, North Carolina, United States of America
Episode Count
1033
Podcast Count
2
Total Airtime
1 week, 1 day
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 139699