Darla Powell is a retired police sergeant turned interior designer, social media wingnut, and principal designer of Darla Powell Interiors.
Lauren Brown launched her design business at age 65—right before the Coronavirus reared its ugly head. In this episode of Wingnut Social, Lauren shares what she had to do to pivot, the marketing that she’s found success with, and what you should and shouldn’t do. Ready to learn from her years of experience? Don’t miss it! What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [2:32] Upcoming content on Wingnut Premium! [4:41] Mini news sesh: Clubhouse on Android? [7:56] All about Lauren Brown [10:08] Launching and immediately pivoting [12:14] The wins and the losses [15:23] Gaining traction with marketing [23:53] The services that Lauren offers [30:25] Why Lauren decided it was time to hire [40:42] The What Up Wingnut! Round [44:18] How to learn more about Lauren Brown [46:59] Check out the blooper reel! Connect with Lauren Brown Lauren’s Website Follow on Instagram Connect on Facebook Resources & People Mentioned Wingnut Social Episode #131 Scarlet Thread Consulting Curio Electro Claire Jefford Interior Design Business Strategies Facebook Group Denise Calhoun Pardue A Well-Designed Business: The Power Talk Friday Experts Vol. 2 The wins, the losses, and the lessons learned Lauren was approached to publish an article in a magazine. Then she did some ads in the magazine. Before she knew it, it had snowballed to ad after ad in multiple magazines. She went to her CPA and realized she spent a lot of money she shouldn’t have—but she just didn’t know.  She advertised on social media the organic way and was featured in some local publications. She decided to go with an old-fashioned billboard—which paid off in a big way. Contractors called, builders called, and clients called. It was targeting the local market and staying top-of-mind.  Lauren was intimidated by social media but didn’t reach out to Darla or anyone else. She also tried building a DIY website. She quickly learned that if you aren’t an expert in any of these areas, you should hire an expert. A better website leads to more people on your page and a lower bounce rate. A bad website can become an easy “no” for a potential client. If your website doesn’t look good, how can your design be good? Designer by your side Lauren will do a consultation with potential clients to determine what they’re looking for. She offers a “designer by your side” package for those doing projects on their own but want a little professional advice. She offers a “concept-to-completion” service for someone building a home. She also offers a “furniture mart concierge” package where she takes a client to Furniture Mart and helps them choose the right pieces for their home.  They’ve all been successful services, but she gets the most revenue from her concept-to-completion service for new home builds. She works directly with two different builders who pay her a percentage to work with their clients. Lauren has learned she wants to concentrate on doing full-service projects—or she’ll run herself ragged. When did Lauren decide it was time to hire? What position did she hire for? And why did she decide to keep a showroom despite the pandemic? Listen to the whole episode to learn more! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-877-WINGNUT (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Wingnut Social Podcast Sponsor Desi Creswell’s Daily Planner   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
According to Nikki Rausch, the objective of a discovery call is to identify whether or not you’re talking to a potential client. How do you determine that? How can you ask the right questions and move them to the next step in the process? How do you close a discovery call with a new client? Nikki shares her strategy in this episode of the Wingnut Social podcast! What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [0:50] Why we’ve had a short break [4:38] Wingnut Social Premium! [6:45] Mini News Sesh [8:52] All about Nikki Rausch [13:37] Closing on discovery calls [16:24] The process for cold leads [18:51] The right questions to ask [32:30] How to STOP providing free advice [34:25] Buying signals to look for [37:35] Always move the project forward [38:36] What up Wingnut! Round [41:00] Learn more about Nikki Connect with Nikki Rausch The Sales Maven Website The Sales Maven Podcast The Selling Staircase by Nikki Rausch Nikki’s free ebook just for Wingnut Social Listeners! Resources & People Mentioned Become a Premium Wingnut! Episode 97 with Nikki Rausch Episode 172 with Desi Creswell BOOK: Wonderworks by Angus Fletcher  Step #1: Pre-frame the conversation What should you say to develop a rapport and get the filter running? Nikki emphasizes that the very first thing you want to do on your discovery call is pre-frame the conversation. It not only creates safety, but it establishes the flow of the call. The client may feel nervous or intimidated about talking to you. Pre-framing the conversation allows you to calm their nerves—and yours.  So what does that look like? You thank them for chatting with you, share the objective of the meeting, lay out how long you’re scheduled to chat, and ask if that still works for them. Then you say “To make this meeting meaningful and productive for you, I’d like to start with a couple of quick questions. Is that alright?” It allows you to take the lead and weed people out quickly. How do you structure it differently if it’s a cold call? Listen to learn more! Step #2: Only ask questions you NEED the answer to  Ask questions that you only need the answers to earn their business and to determine if they’re a good client fit. Many designers try to ask all the questions in the discovery call, instead of waiting until after signing the contract. This is a no-no. Tailor the discovery call to 7–10 questions whenever possible. So what types of questions should you ask? What’s important to you about your redesign? You need to determine what’s important to them and see if you can solve their pain point.  What is your budget or potential investment? You don’t want to talk to someone who has $500. This is the hardest thing to pull out of clients. They’re afraid to tell you because they think you’ll use their entire budget. Secondly, they just have no idea what the costs are. Who—besides yourself—is involved in the decision-making process? You don’t want to have a full conversation just to find out you have to repeat it with a significant other. What do you already know about [insert your firm name here]? It helps identify if they have inaccurate information about your business. Secondly, it allows them to be the expert in the moment. It creates a balance of power.  Ask questions to reinforce anything they can be right about. Why? Most people like to be right. They’ll be more open to hearing what you have to say if you can say “You’re right…” Any remaining questions you have can be specific to their particular project. How do you STOP providing free advice on a discovery call? Listen for Nikki’s tips! Step #3: Look for buying signals A buying signal is a verbal or nonverbal cue that people use to indicate interest. It often comes in the form of a question, like, “If someone were to hire you, where do you source the product?” It’s a huge buying signal. Another example? When someone brings up a negative experience. If they share that story with you, they’re looking for reassurance that you won’t do the same thing. What else do you look for? What should you do at the end of a discovery call when the client is a good fit? Listen to the whole episode with Nikki Rausch to find out! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-877-WINGNUT (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Wingnut Social Podcast Sponsor Desi Creswell’s Daily Planner Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
Are physical product libraries dying out? Are they even necessary? Are digital product libraries becoming the way of the future? Rex Rogosch—Darla Powell Interiors’ very own Creative Director—shares where he thinks the space is moving. If you need some tips and tricks to start building your own digital product library, don’t miss this episode of Wingnut Social!  What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [2:00] How to maximize video on Facebook [9:50] Rex Rogosch is back on the podcast! [11:48] Building a product library digitally [15:15] Is it more important for some designers? [17:04] How do you get inspired? [18:33] Your projects are your library [19:47] Trade shows + markets [27:10] How to organize your library [32:22] The What Up Wingnut Round! [35:39] Blooper Reel! Connect with Rex Rogosch Darla Powell Interiors Connect on LinkedIn Resources & People Mentioned Wingnut Social Episode 190 with Rex Rogosch Material Bank Mydoma Physical product libraries are dying out When Rex worked commercially or in large firms, they had hundreds of square feet dedicated to product libraries. They were always working to keep the space up-to-date, clean, and organized. Rex would use the library for inspiration and direction or to make last-minute sample switches. But most of his work was already online ordering new samples.  How do you work as a designer? How do you find inspiration? You have to find your own comfort zone. Are you comfortable moving into a digital platform? Or do you have to feel and touch everything? Rex grew up sourcing digitally and he’s comfortable with digital catalogs. If you want or need a physical library, make it more about your favorite things and what inspires you. Personalize it with your go-to items and then use digital sample libraries and material banks. Hold on to the samples until the project is done and then offload them.  Now, instead of relying on a product library, Rex gets inspiration from talking to the clients and seeing their inspiration photos. Do they have blue in every picture? Limestone in every photo? He takes those notes and builds upon them. Someone else may have images or photos you’ve never seen or interacted with.  How to organize a digital—or physical—library Rex notes that your digital library lives in each project that you have saved. He doesn’t necessarily recommend archiving photos because you’ll end up with another library. If Rex ever has to refer to a product, he can go pull it from a project. With a quick google search, finding stuff digitally is pretty quick.  If you still want a physical library, it needs to stay organized. How large is the library? Can you have specific sections for tile, glass, fabrics, etc? Then you subset it from there. For example, Rex organizes fabric first by vendor. Then he organizes by color. Why? Because a color scheme is one of the first things designers know after a consultation.  Sometimes designers get complacent with the vendors that they work with. Suddenly all of your designs look the same. Organizing by color instead of vendor is one way to vary who you work with. Expert Tip: If you have a good rep, they will come update your library and clear out outdated products. They don’t want to do it, but they will to get back in front of their customers.  For more of the conversation around digital libraries, listen to the whole episode! It’s packed with useful strategies and tips.  Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-877-WINGNUT (connect with us for your social media marketing needs) Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
What is intuition? Is it the same thing as a gut feeling? Is intuition the same for everyone? After making a series of bad decisions that led to the death of a friend, Sunil Godse spent thousands of hours researching how to help people stop making poor decisions by sharpening their intuition. Intuitionology was born.  In this episode of Wingnut Social, Sunil talks about how to define intuition, the science of intuition, the four intuitive hurdles, and the four types of intuition. Whew. The episode is jam-packed with fascinating science and intuition-based information. Don’t miss it! What You’ll Hear On This Episode of Wingnut Social [1:30] FREE visibility training [3:08] The dos and don’ts of Instagram [8:53] The science of intuition  [9:23] All about Intuitionology  [16:34] How accurate is a gut feeling? [21:47] The four intuitive hurdles [28:26] How to differentiate fear [33:27] The four different types of intuition [39:41] Intuition is a two-way street [45:27] The What Up Wingnut! Round [51:41] Blooper Reel! Connect with Sunil Godse Sunil’s TEDx Talk Intuitionology Seven Day Challenge Follow on Twitter Connect on LinkedIn Resources & People Mentioned FREE visibility training on March 3rd at 1 pm Est. with Amanda Berlin Amanda Berlin’s Wingnut Social Episode #190 The Brain-Gut Connection BOOK: Power vs. Force Intuition is defined by individuals How do you view intuition? When Sunil was 5, he wanted video games, which his Dad said were expensive. A voice in his head told him to go door-to-door to raise money. Other times, he had “things” in his mind telling him what not to do. What are these “somethings?” How do you define it? For some people, it’s a voice from God, spiritual manifestation, etc. But that didn’t resonate with Sunil. He refers to these “somethings” he felt as “signals.”  Sunil started interviewing people about intuition. He went to a neurologist and talked to him about the science of the gut and neurons. More and more research shows that intuition happens before we’re even conscious of it. Intuition hits you at the amygdala—the fight or flight portion of the brain.  All the amygdala knows is fear. There is no language in that part of the brain. If there’s no language, how can you give the experience a definition? Because you can understand what it feels like. Because of this, you get to construct your own language and definition of intuition.  How accurate is a gut feeling? Sunil interviewed over 1,000 people and found that there are positive and negative signals associated with intuition. Those signals are unique to each person. Positive signals are there to help you decide a decision because the decision is the right one. For Sunil, it feels like dots connecting or being in flow. Others refer to it as a gentle pull. One person referred to it as an omen. What are your positive signals? Negative signals warn you that a decision you’re about to make is a bad one. For Sunil, a gut feeling is a negative signal. Negative signals can be subtle in nature. Everyone has gotten an instant “something is wrong feeling.” It can be so subtle that we tend to ignore it. But those signals get louder until they can’t be ignored. In some cases, people get headaches and one person heard the words “get out.” That gut feeling may be signal #3 for Sunil. If it’s signal #3, that means he missed two signals—two opportunities to make the right decision. We need to take the time to figure out what our signals are. Or the consequences can cost you. What are the four intuitive hurdles? How does this impact your decision-making? Keep listening to learn more! The impact of listening to your intuition In his research, Sunil found that infants as young as 2 months old have intuitive capabilities. Intuition takes experiences and puts them in your subconscious. It’s like a library. When you make a decision, your intuition goes into that personalized library and sorts through past decisions. You may think it’s a split-second decision, but your brain tells you that you’ve been there before.  Sunil knows a man with cerebral palsy who finally got a chance to sink his toes into the sand on a beach. It was a lifelong dream of his. His friends wheeled him up to the sand and he fell flat on his face. He had two choices: he could succumb to fear and sit back in his wheelchair and leave. OR, he could trust his intuition, face the fear, and step into the water.  So he walked in the water until the water got to his neck. Then he turned around. When he looked back, he saw how far he had come. That’s what happens when you listen to your intuitive signals. You take steps to battle the fear. If it’s a positive signal, take it. You develop confidence and shed fear. Anything you do is driven by intuition. If you start trusting your intuition, life will be great every single day. What are the four different types of intuition? How do you know if a gut-feeling is negative intuition or you simply staying in your comfort zone? We’ve barely scratched the surface on this post. Listen to the whole episode to learn more about the power of intuition! Connect With Darla & Wingnut Social www.WingnutSocial.com On Facebook On Twitter: @WingnutSocial On Instagram: @WingnutSocial Darla’s Interior Design Website Check out the Wingnut Social Media Lab Facebook Group! 1-877-WINGNUT (connect with us for your social media marketing needs)   Subscribe to The Wingnut Social Podcast on iTunes, Google Podcasts, or TuneIn Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com
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Creator Details

Location
Miami, FL, USA
Episode Count
220
Podcast Count
7
Total Airtime
4 days, 15 hours
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 153094