Donald Gerard McNeil is a science and health opinion writer for the New York Times.
In the U.S., emergency-use authorization has been granted for convalescent plasma, the efficacy of which is yet to be robustly tested. For some, this echoes the situation with hydroxychloroquine and the government’s subsequent U-turn on its rollout.Meanwhile, America’s infection rate appears to be flattening out — but at tens of thousands of cases per day. This stands in stark contrast to China, where daily cases are under 40.Overseas, a Hong Kong resident has been reinfected with the virus, the first recorded instance of a second bout. And Russia and China have begun distributing vaccines, sidestepping Phase 3 safety trials to the incredulity of immunologists and vaccine executives.We check back in with Donald G. McNeil Jr. on the coronavirus and the impact of these developments.Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: A 33-year-old man in Hong Kong was infected with the coronavirus for a second time. It is unclear how often people might become reinfected, and how soon after the first bout.Despite flattening, America’s infection rate remains one of the highest in the world.The F.D.A. has permitted the expansion of convalescent plasma treatment after pressure from President Trump.Russia has approved a coronavirus vaccine and is set to begin mass vaccinations in the fall. China has reportedly been giving experimental vaccines to high-risk groups since July. 
Infection rates broke records across the United States over the holiday weekend, with many of the most severe surges in areas that reopened fastest. One thing that seems to have played a factor: transmission indoors, such as in restaurants and bars. We break down the risk, and look at what else scientists have learned about the coronavirus and how it spreads. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Many scientists have been saying for months that the coronavirus lingers in the air indoors, infecting those nearby. But the World Health Organization has been slow to agree.Black and Latino residents of the United States are nearly twice as likely to die from Covid-19 as their white neighbors, according to new data that provides the most comprehensive look yet at coronavirus patients in America.
States are reopening. Parks are crowded. Restaurants are filling, again, with diners. But is this dangerous? Six months into the pandemic, we reflect on what we’ve learned about the virus — and ask how that knowledge should chart the course forward. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: As New York businesses reopened, Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned that a second wave of infections was almost inevitable if residents did not abide by social-distancing rules. “It will come,” he said. “And once it comes, it’s too late.” Restrictions are easing across the United States, but Arizona, Florida and Texas are reporting their highest case numbers yet. As of Saturday, coronavirus cases were climbing in 22 states.
As almost every U.S. state in is now set to lighten lockdown restrictions, America's top infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci testified on Tuesday before the Senate Health Committee. The message: open too quickly and face serious consequences. Donna Shalala, former U.S. Health and Human Services secretary, joins Christiane to digest the hearings. Donald G. McNeil Jr., science and health reporter at the New York Times, talks to Christiane about America's roadmap to recovery, and the politicization of the coronavirus pandemic. Icelandic Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir explains how her country got the coronavirus under control, without imposing strict lockdown measures, and reflects on her next steps to protect Iceland's economy. And Hari Sreenivasan speaks to world-renowned clinical researcher Dr. F. Perry Wilson about dangers of misunderstanding, and even deliberate misinformation, when politics and medicine collide.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy
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Creator Details

Birthdate
Feb 1st, 1954
Episode Count
11
Podcast Count
5
Total Airtime
5 hours, 52 minutes
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 149564