Laurie Santos is a professor of psychology and cognitive science at Yale University, her research explores the evolutionary origins of the human mind by comparing the cognitive abilities of humans and non-human animals, including primates and canines.
Recent episodes featuring Laurie Santos
The Money Paradox
TED Radio Hour
What does money tell us about human nature? How does it motivate, trick, satisfy and disappoint us? In this hour, TED speakers share insights into our relationship with money. Guests include psychologist Laurie Santos, behavioral economist Keith Chen, social psychologist Paul Piff, writer Daniel Pink and social scientist Michael Norton. (Original broadcast date: April 4, 2014).
The Money Paradox (R)
TED Radio Hour
What does money tell us about human nature? How does it motivate, trick, satisfy and disappoint us? In this hour, TED speakers share insights into our relationship with money. Psychologist Laurie Santos studies human irrationality by observing how primates make decisions — including some not-so-savvy money choices their human relatives often make. Behavioral economist Keith Chen says languages that don’t have a future tense strongly correlate with higher savings. Social psychologist Paul Piff describes how almost anyone’s behavior can change when they’re made to feel rich. Career analyst and writer Daniel Pink explains why traditional rewards like money aren't always successful motivators. Social scientist Michael Norton researches how money can buy happiness — the key is social spending that benefits not just you, but other people.  
Ep. 270: Laurie Santos Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio
Trend Following with Michael Covel
Michael Covel speaks with Laurie Santos on today’s podcast. Santos is a professor of psychology and cognitive sciences at Yale University. Her research explores the evolutionary origins of the human mind by comparing the cognitive abilities of human and non-human primates. Santos is able to look at monkeys and their behavior in markets and money, and see the similarities with humans. Covel and Santos discuss some of Santos’ early “ah-ha” moments; teaching monkeys about currencies; whether the monkey economy is as irrational as ours; the endowment effect; how monkeys’ behavior in markets quantitatively matches human behavior; whether some monkeys took to the experimental economy better than others; mistakes and predictable errors; why humans might be uniquely irrational when it comes to enjoying what we pay more for; Vernon Smith’s work; relationships between Santos’ work and the financial crisis of 2008; bubbles, monkeys, and Daniel Kahneman; the “G.I. Joe fallacy”; and why we have trouble accepting cognitive limitations rather than our biological limitations. For more information on Laurie Santos visit www.yale.edu/caplab. Want a free trend following DVD? Go to trendfollowing.com/win.
Episode 33: Monkeys, Smurfs, and Human Conformity (With Laurie Santos)
Very Bad Wizards
Special guest Laurie Santos (Psychology, Yale) joins us to talk about what animal cognition can tell us about human nature. Why are other primates better at resisting the misleading influence of others than humans? Is conformity a byproduct of our sophisticated cultural learning capacities? Are we more like Chimpanzees or Bonobos? Why does Dave spend so much time writing Smurf fan fiction? [Smurf you, Tamler. -dap]. Also, Dave and Tamler talk about a scathing review of Malcolm Gladwell's new book, and Eliza Sommers poses the question of the day. This was a fun one. LinksComparative Cognition Laboratory [yale.edu]Laurie Santos and Jesse Bering on The Mind Report [bloggingheads.tv] Buy Jesse Bering's latest book "Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us" [amazon.com affiliate link]Philospher's Pipe (a directory of podcasts related to philosophy) [philosopherspipe.com]Smurfette [wikipedia.org]Horner, V., & Whiten, A. (2005). Causal knowledge and imitation/emulation switching in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and children (Homo sapiens). Animal cognition, 8(3), 164-181.Kovács, Á. M., Téglás, E., & Endress, A. D. (2010). The social sense: Susceptibility to others’ beliefs in human infants and adults. Science, 330(6012), 1830-1834. True Bonobo Love [youtube.com]Bonobos vs. Chimps [youtube.com] What does the fox say? [youtube.com] "The Trouble With Malcolm Gladwell."  by Christopher Chabris [Slate.com]."Christopher Chabris Should Calm Down" by Malcolm Gladwell [Slate.com]  Special Guest: Laurie Santos.Support Very Bad Wizards
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Stats
Episode Count
4
Podcast Count
3
Total Airtime
2 hours, 23 minutes