Peter Shankman is an American entrepreneur and author. He is best known for founding HARO, an online service for journalists to gather feedback from the public. Currently he hosts The Faster Than Normal Podcast.
Today’s guest Rachel says:  I was a distraction. I could be disruptive. I used to think this was the way it was always going to be.  I used to believe the labels that had been assigned to me through my life were who I was. My brain was like popcorn and would work at four million miles per hour. I really thought this was my identity and who I was. I had allowed myself to be defined by the labels and experiences, rather than using them to shape me. I believed I would never be good enough because ‘that’ was who I was, and you can’t change …. Or can you? Powered by a supercharged ADHD driven mind. I am sharing the motivation, inspiration and perspiration from the university of my life.    I’m Rachel Young, I was put on this planet to make a difference to people’s lives and to get people moving, both physically and mentally. I am a highly motivated (and very easily distracted) character.  Simply put, I love the fitness industry and I love nothing more than helping others to become the best version of themselves.  I have over 30 years of experiences, stories, highs and lows from my adventures in the fitness industry. I am driven by people but results are key and that is what I deliver. I’ve worked around the world in exciting, high profile roles and love nothing more than meeting new people and enabling others to achieve their true potential.  I am passionate about fitness, health and wellbeing; physical, mental and emotional - you can’t be truly ‘well’ unless you focus on them all. This passion is backed up by my knowledge and expertise in all things programming, training, education, products, member experience and retention. I am an innovative motivator who thrives on rising to any challenge; I love a challenge and the thrill of the chase. I am ferociously committed to sharing my experience of refocusing, rewiring & redefining myself, my personal development, my life experiences and my life in the fitness world, with the intention of making an impact on you. My videos and stories are underpinned by my personal story of self development, acknowledging my ADHD traits and how, by harnessing these, I have been able to make dramatic change in all aspects of my life. I have had incredibly dark times in my life as I am sure we all have. I have worked through these and have grown to understand and appreciate how our brains works, especially in challenging times. This journey has been an incredible roller -coaster; it hasn’t been an easy ride, but it certainly is worth it! Lockdown forced the extrovert to look in, there were no distractions or excuses to make - its was finally time to bring all the learning together and launch my website: https://www.areyousupercharged.com/    Today we’re learning about physical, mental and emotional health. Enjoy! ***CORONA VIRUS EDITION*** In this episode Peter & Rachel discuss: :55-  Intro and welcome Rachel Young! 1:29-  Tell us your story! 4:08-  When you are labeled in school as “one of the naughty kids” it almost becomes a self fulfilling prophecy doesn’t it; let’s talk about that. 6:58-  If you could tell your 14yr-old-self something from what you know today, what would that be? 7:33-  What do you think we’re missing or leaving out when we talk to kids about neurodiversity today? 8:44-  On the ADHD “Now” and the “Not Now” 9:26-  How do you handle people in the workplace who are not neurodiverse like us; how do you handle deadlines, schedules and so on? 10:40-  What’s a-day-in-the-life like for you Rachel? 12:07-  How do you bring yourself back, if you fall out of that “zone of focus”? 14:52-  What is your other superpower? Find Rachel on the web at www.areyousupercharged.com and on Socials @ChargedAre on Twitter, areyousupercharged on INSTA, @AreYouSupercharged on FB and on YouTube & LinkedIn 15:25-  Thank you Rachel! And thank YOU for subscribing, reviewing and listening. Your reviews are working! Even if you’ve reviewed us before, would you please write even a short one for this episode? Each review that you post helps to ensure that word will continue to spread, and that we will all be able to reach & help more people! You can always reach me via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterThanNormal on all of the socials. STAY HEALTHY - STAY SAFE - PLEASE WEAR YOUR MASK.. until next time! 15:56-  Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits As always, leave us a comment below and please drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven’t already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse! Do you know of anyone you think should be on the FTN podcast? Shoot us a note, we’d love to hear! We have a new sister video cast called 20MinutesInLockdown! A video podcast devoted to learning fascinating lessons from interesting humans all around the world, all in 20 minutes or less!  20 Minutes in Lockdown was born in early April of 2020, when we were in fact, in lockdown, and couldn’t do much of anything. Realizing that more than ever, people could benefit from learning from people outside of their comfort zone – people with interesting stories to tell, people with good advice, people with useful ideas that could help improve lives, we started hosting short Facebook video interviews, and we grew from there. (Plus, you can actually see my hair colors change before your very eyes!) Check it out:  www.20MinutesInLockdown.com   TRANSCRIPT: Hey guys, welcome back to another episode of faster than normal. I'm thrilled that you're here. We took a couple of weeks off this summer when all around the world explore and had lovely dinners.  No we're not going any of that crap, we're still in a little pandemic. Wear your masks! But that being said is great to be back and we get a great guests.  Today we're going all the way to Nottingham England to welcome Rachel Young, Rachel is a director of business development in the fitness industry, and she has had ADHD pretty much all her life and she realized what used to be a horrendous challenge has moved her to what she calls a supercharged, ADHD, driven mind, and she shares what innovation, inspiration and perspiration. From the university of her life. So welcome, Rachel. Good to have you.  Thanks very much for having me Peter, I’m pretty excited to be here today and to be able to share with you. Love it. I love it. Tell us your story. So you were never formally diagnosed, but tell us your story about how you discovered it, how you discovered it. You see, what was it like as a kid? Tell us the whole thing.   As you said never formally diagnosed, but I was kind of mislabeled and misdiagnosed at school and fell into the naughty kid brackets and actually wore that incredibly well. Um, I was the one that was easily, easily distracted. Um, the one that I couldn't pay attention put outside class because you weren't in zone and you weren't focusing. So then you put outside of class, you're kind of hanging out with all the other naughty kids. And you almost fall into that category of, of misbehaving. Um, I always thought that, you know, the constant noise and chatter in my head was, was what everybody had. And there was journeys throughout my life where I'd been incredibly successful, but in spite of myself, and I didn't understand what was going on. And so I actually threw myself headfirst into. Lots of kind of self management and thriving on the stress, thriving on life, working horrendous long hours to almost self medicate, clearly throwing yourself into alcohol and the wrong things. But then finally sort of was able to appreciate that it was probably better than the circumstances, better than what was going on. And it was actually locked down and been on a bit of a journey, you know, throughout my life , knowing that I had to recognize this. But actually locked down is a, is a tiny I've actually thrived upon irrespective of, you know, the challenging circumstances. And as a, as a natural extrovert, I was forced to look in. There was no distractions. There were no excuses. There was no reason to focus on anything else. Apart from looking inward and looking at myself and going actually. How do I stop this noise that I intermittently stopped over the years? How do I focus on making myself the best version of me? And I have to admit, to be honest with you. I was pretty scared. I was pretty scared at the beginning of lockdown, not for health reasons, but I was actually scared what was going to what I was going to find by looking in. How I was going to be able to manage it and deal with it. And I kind of appreciated over the journey that the things that I've learned through my life, the learnings that I dipped in and out, all of them in terms of trying to study, I could actually leverage by just focusing a little bit differently. The first port of call I went to was kind of a meditation.  Let's stop for a second. Let's go back to what you were saying about school. You know, it's really interesting when, when you are labeled as one of the naughty kids and almost as a self fulfilling prophecy, right? In the respect of, well, if you labeled that way and you're not in class, you're going to get into trouble. Yeah, 100% and you almost, you wear those labels. So it was my, my identity and I, it was who I became. And during those times at school, you know, the rest of the group were. Almost looking to me to be the joker. And actually I became the cool kid. So I was, you know, I had loads of friends, but I wasn't, I wasn't very well popular with the family when my school reports would come home. And actually more recently I've looked at all my old school reports and I read them and I, it was a real eye opener, that things like a disruptive, the less said the better, um, I want those labels really stuck with me. I remember one in particular. I remember the conversation with my dad when my score report came home and it says, has not reached her full potential. And I was, I was devastated. I was very, very upset by it. But the funny thing was my dad was saying to me, this is brilliant. You're only 14. You know, if you'd reached your full potential, now I'll be quite upset then. But he can joke about it now, and I can make humor out of the most situations. But when you look back and see what was written, that had a dramatic impact because I wore them, I wore those tags. That's the thing is that, is that you, you find that when you're labeled something, you have two roads, you either accept it or you fight against it.  Yeah, I accepted those ones. And I would always use them as I kind of refer it, refer to them as my comfy pair of slippers. So when I was, you know, almost ending kind of as sort of throughout my career, I've been really successful. And as I have been successful, there was a part of me that was tapping away at the shoulder going. But you're disruptive, you're distracting. You're never going to advance a much, you know, and all of those reports would be almost my comfort zone that I would slip back into until honestly, until recently when I've had the, I guess, the courage to be authentic about who I am. my experiences managing my, my superpower, learning how to learn. I was always told that I wasn't going to be, you know, amount to anything because I couldn't learn, I couldn't pay attention. So I would almost have a fear of picking up a book or trying to learn because I didn't want to fail. I didn't want to be bad at it. What do you think? Um, if you could tell your 14 year old self something now, knowing what you know today, what would you tell her?  I would say that you're capable of great things and that the biggest muscle and the best muscle in your body is your brain. Don't be constrained by anybody else's hashtags and be accountable to the man in the mirror. You know, my dad used to always say to me, remember who you are and remember who you are. And the value of that is it's all about, it's all about you.  What do you think we're missing when we talk to kids about ADHD and neurodiversity today, what do you think? What are we not telling them that we should be? That it's okay. That it's okay to be able to talk and to speak out. It's okay to share your feelings. Um, you are not alone in this constant noise and brain chatter. Um, and. I think it also goes not only to the communication to those kids, but it's also to the rest of the kids, around them to get a bit of an understanding of who they're dealing with and how to, you know, my, one of my biggest learnings about me was being more accepting to other people and more, you know, it's a two way street, isn't it? So either you're on the ADHD side offense or you're on the senior, the path they'll roll parent's side of the fence. And that's a big understanding. You know, when they won't answer the phone and you've got something really exciting to share. Like I'm, I'm the most important person in the world, but you know, you've got to realize that perhaps that person's, you know, busy or doing something right now. And if they do busy, you, it's not because they're not interested.  And that I think is one of the basic thing that people don't realize is when you're ADHD every day, there's two types of time there's now and there's not now, and that's it, right? The concept of waiting or taking time out either it doesn't really exist in our world. And we need to sort of come to terms with that and figure out ways to deal with it.  So then when the now and the not now, sorry, the now and the not now is a big thing for me. And I think that's how I, I would never say no to anything. So throughout kind of my, my, my professional career, I would take on every single project and I would probably complete them not to the best of my ability, but I would just say yes to everything. So even in the middle of a project, someone goes, do you think you could consider taking this on absolutely. Now.  What do you think about, talk about what you do in the workplace and how you handle deadlines. How do you handle working with people who are not all the way we are? Um, made sure that my, my work station and my environment is set up well, so conducive to me being productive. So no distractions, I would have a windows shop. Sorry, curtain shut. So I can't actually look out the window. I made sure that my technology is tamed and my notifications are turned off. So there are no directions, sorry, distractions or incoming. Unless I'm in control of that. I find that when I go into a meeting, I have to set the room up and structure it. So I want to sit with my kind of back to the window and focus really hard on it. I'm paying attention to that room. I think. The biggest, the biggest thing has been the meditation and creating the brain space for me or the mind space, not to just react, just jump, just get distracted. And it is, it is a full time job. That's what I didn't appreciate managing, managing me as a full time job.  That's managing you as a full time job.  I like that! “Managing me is a full time job”. I need have a tee shirt made with that, um, Talk about what, what kind of things you do at work or talking about, you're talking about your day. I mean, talk about, uh, you know, when you wake up, do you exercise? How do you get the dopamine? Things like that.  Yeah, 100 percent. Fitness has always been a massive part of my life. I'm in the fitness industry because it's the fun business, it's the entertainment business. Um, and you know, I believe we're in a place where we can make a dramatic difference to people's lives, both physically and mentally. So I'm on stage all the time, irrespective of what we do wake up in the mornings and I will always work out. I have to work out first thing, um, because that gives me now the absolute clarity of thinking, um, and almost tired body for the rest of the day. Um, I work out work with my zone. I workout with, um, part kind of heart rate tracking that rewards your efforts and I've found that by using this, it really helps me focus on my, uh, my control, my discipline, uh, my ability to learn. So I can do a workout where you're lifting weights, um, but I can also do I call it brain training as well. So I'm sitting on the bike and I'm out of a podcast or a book that I'm listening in listening to and I get into a certain zone. I stayed at my body is occupied it's not going to get distracted. And my brain is focused on what I'm going to be doing and learning.  How do you bring yourself back if you fall out of that zone?  But that's really interesting because I'm now able to, or, you know, sometimes I go down a rabbit hole and then, but I'm aware of the rabbit hole and I'd go, I kind of go take it back to that sort of mindfulness. I'm very focused on what I'm doing. And then there will be a point and you go, I can actually say- you're getting distracted. Yeah. And, and that's something I've never been able to do, but that's with the consistent practice. This isn't just a, you know, you know, it's not just a book or something you implement for one day, you know, one on bicep pull does not maketh guns. You know, this taming us an absolutely relentless daily daily process.  I think that's what a lot of people don't realize is that it's not something you just put into play and then forget about it. You have to constantly. Be aware of your ADHD or it will get the best of you.  Yeah. And it's exhausting. I think it's exhausting.. And massively rewarding because my, I have no idea of my capabilities in terms of what I'm able to learn because I've, I've learned so much and being able to adapt recently, but it truly is a superpower because I'm not just reading these books, I'm able to read, understand, feed it back, process it, apply it to my life and that's where it gets really exciting. And, uh, that's probably the, the next stimulant is now I'm addicted to brain training. Well, that's the thing, as you learn more and more about what works for you, it creates a feedback loop. Right. In that you enjoy it. You want to do more of it. There's negative feedback loops of positive feedback loops. It sounded like you found the positive feedback.  Yeah, sure. And then the, the other great benefit of it is, you know, I started this all started to really come out to be visible during lockdown and as I said, I, you know, I started with a massive amount of fear about how I was going to personally cope and lock down. And I made myself a. Um, a Facebook live video just to hold myself accountable. And then, and as I started to do that, you know, people in my network and this one really was not the intention fed back to me and when now that story really resonates with me or God, I can't concentrate, do you, does that really work? I've tried to implement this. So it's been a real journey of kind of almost, you know, self-discovery on so many different levels. And accountability and tracking through, you know, videos or apps or anything has really helped, you know, what gets measured gets done. Yeah. As they say, as they say  No question about it. Um, last question I have for you. What is your other superpower assuming you have let's let's assume we all have two. ADHD is one. What's your other one? My super power is I have an innate ability to get the best out of people. And I have no idea where that comes from or how it happens, but I managed to get people to buy into an, understand the vision and get on board and to go with it. I love it. I love it. What a great way to end. Thank you so much. I really appreciate you taking the time on fast to normal, and I hope you enjoyed it. Thank you Peter!
David is not only my best friend, he is my running partner, he's my triathlon coach and he was the one who got busted with me when we both got a summons for exercising in Central Park in the morning before it opened. He's been with me through thick and thin and I'm glad he was around to join us. Today we’re learning how things have been going for him during these weird days, his advice and perspective as a teacher, a husband, father, and an Iron Man coach who is also- you guessed it- ADHD. Enjoy!   ***CORONA VIRUS EDITION***   In this episode Peter & David discuss: :58-  Intro and welcome David Roher! 2:00-  How’s it going right now from your perspective as a Special Education teacher? 3:30-  How are the kids handling it? 4:22-  Why do you think elementary schoolers are having such a tough time of it? 5:04-  Does T-Pain have all the answers? No, just a wild-timed digital audio glitch! 5:32-  On a child’s mental process & adaptation during a pandemic 6:28-  How are you holding up? 7:40-  On acknowledging things out loud 8:00-  Have there been any particularly difficult elements of all of this for you? 8:32-  We’ve adapted many times before- we can do this! 9:00-  What percentage of your survival would you credit to exercise? 10:17-  Do you think we all get a “pass for effort” this year so far? 11:32-  Thank you! Hey how can we find you? @davidroher140.6 on INSTA or via www.tricoachdavid.com  12:12-  David’s final thoughts for us. 12:58-  Thank you David for joining us today! And thank YOU for subscribing, reviewing and listening. Your reviews are working! Even if you’ve reviewed us before, would you please write even a short one for this episode? Each review that you post helps to ensure that word will continue to spread, and that we will all be able to reach & help more people! You can always reach me via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterThanNormal on all of the socials. STAY HEALTHY - STAY SAFE - PLEASE WEAR YOUR MASK.. until next time! 13:20-  Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits As always, leave us a comment below and please drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven’t already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse! Do you know of anyone you think should be on the FTN podcast? Shoot us a note, we’d love to hear! We have a new sister video cast called 20MinutesInLockdown! A video podcast devoted to learning fascinating lessons from interesting humans all around the world, all in 20 minutes or less!  20 Minutes in Lockdown was born in early April of 2020, when we were in fact, in lockdown, and couldn’t do much of anything. Realizing that more than ever, people could benefit from learning from people outside of their comfort zone – people with interesting stories to tell, people with good advice, people with useful ideas that could help improve lives, we started hosting short Facebook video interviews, and we grew from there. (Plus, you can actually see my hair colors change before your very eyes!) Check it out:  www.20MinutesInLockdown.com   TRANSCRIPT:  Hey guys, Peter, Shankman welcome to the episode of faster than normal. You know, during the summer it gets tough to find guests. I don't know where they all go. I guess they go outside of the country. They leave, they, they, they snuggle up, they avoid COVID, whatever it is, but, but fortunately. You know, at the end of the day, I still have people that matter. And one of those people is my very good best friend, David Roher. I have known David now more than, Oh my God, it's going to be 10 years in October. And we met. On the run course of my first iron man, iron man in 2010, because we were both dying and both exhausted, but we still have both managed to finish the iron man. And David, we knew right away, we were massively ADHD. We knew right away. We were basically brothers from another mother, David. Good to have you back. My friend. Good to be here. Peter David, you interviewed me God a while back. I think it was my hundredth episode. Something like that. Right. You're 100th was your parents, but I interviewed you a couple of years before that. And it was definitely a summer. It was the first time I met Ruth Carter. Yep. So yeah, long time it's been a while, but David, David is my not only my, my best friend is my running partner. He's my triathlon coach. Um, we have done, we have, we have, David was the one who got busted with me when we got, when we got summons for exercising and central park before it opened, uh, he's been with me through thick and thin, and that seemed to have be back, man. So. Tell me, you're a teacher and you guys went onto homes. You, you went to homeschooling not only for your kids, but for your, as a teacher back in March. That's correct. March 13th is when we were told today's the last day. You're not coming in on Monday, bring your iPads with you. And this is what we're going to do. We're going live now from home. But what happened in White Plains is they said, we're going to use a website. We all emailed our students and I would call homes and talk to parents and talk to students. But since the middle of March, I've not really seen my students. And that's a really difficult place to be when you're a teacher and you teach special education and being able to be one on one with them is a big piece of it. No question about it. So how, how have you been handling that, you know, with the premise that, that, um, especially for you, it's kind of students you work with and what you, you know, the way you teach you're really hands on. Right? So that's, has that been tough? It's been very difficult, you know, when you teach special ed and you are a special ed student, as you alluded to, I understand the kids and we live in a world where you don't physically touch students, but you connect to them by making eye contact by understanding the nuances of physical movements. And when you don't have that, it's really hard to read them. It's like an email. Where I can't tell the intent of an email, let me stick an emoji. And there's at least they know I'm there. I'll be trying to communicate a positive five, right? No question about it. What about, um, and how did the kids handle it? Cause I know that, you know, all I know is, is, is, is from my, my, uh, my daughter that's been, she's been having a tough time. How did the kids been handling? So I teach high school. So my high school students, I had. From September til March to make that connection with them. And so they did phenomenally well, I was so proud of them. You know, they got the work in, they reached out to me. If I hadn't heard from anybody, I reached out to them. We made sure that they had access to the website. We made sure that we were able to provide the supports for them. The teenagers adapted very well to this model. But these are high schoolers. Now I can tell you, because I'm a parent, I have a ninth grader and a parent of a second grader. I think the elementary school kids had a much more difficult time with this. Yeah. Talk about why you think that is and how have your kids been helping? Well, you know, my son is a year older than your daughter and my son is on the spectrum. So he has, in addition to his add, he has other issues. Yes. What we call high functioning and you know what I mean? He's just my kid, right. There are certain characteristics when you have students like that. And my wife has been home because she was asked by her job workshop down in the office. Nobody come in, she sat one on one with them. So he flourished on the environment, but he flourished because he had an adult sitting with them, refocusing him and being able to help him. I think that's the real key here. When you're dealing with elementary school children. Yeah, I think there's a lot of that. You know, the, the, the concept of, if the kids don't know what's going on, all of a sudden they know they're not with their friends. Right. And you try to explain to them what the buyers is, but, you know, it's tough. They, they thrive on, uh, they thrive on connection. They thrive, you know, their job as, as, as, as six year old seven year olds, eight year olds is to make friends. It's really funny to watch that first, second, third grade brain adapt to this. On the one hand they go, okay, it's COVID I have to wear a mask. I don't wanna get the virus. I got to stay home. But on the other hand, they're now trying to process in their brain. How do I take the way I operate? And modify that. Right. And some from some kids from a psychological perspective, you know, I always say when you suppress something, it's like pushing a water balloon down under water, something's going to pop up. So we see kids find this amazing adaptive skill, but for some kids, it's just, I'm getting bored and burned out. I'm getting fatigued, little kids fatigue faster on zoom. I believe. Well, I think it's also the premise that the kids have this thing about. Um, you know, they, they don't sit still cause they're kids, right? So you, you show 'em, you show the premise of like, okay, and now we're gonna discuss this. And all of a sudden, you know, one of the kids is holding up their cat. Right. It just, it's harder when, when they're not in class and they don't have that same structure with the other kids. How are you holding? Because I know that from, from my person, from my standpoint of ADHD is the brutal, you know, being able to try to, um, just be human, right. You know, and try to do the things I normally do has been tough for me. What about you? It's not been that difficult, to be honest. I mean, for me, my world revolves around the following things. I'm an Orthodox Jews. So I get up the morning and I say, my prayers, well, I've never had a problem praying at home instead of going to services. Um, teaching, I get up in the morning and I look at the work hand in hand by my students. I programmed the next set of lessons for those students. Not difficult. I'm an athlete. Well, I can't swim, but I can still bike and I can still run. And I desperately miss my swimming cause that's my love my source. So there was a certain adoptation to that. And then there was the, we have to go to the store. At some point we can't hide in the house and I know people who literally had their food delivered to them and I respect that, but we went to the store, we shaped steps, we stayed six feet. We wear a mask, we wear gloves, you know, human beings are incredibly adaptable. And so for me, it was just. All right. I have to mentally make a note. Cause I have add, this is the change I have to do. And if I say it out loud and I say to my wife and she echoes it back at me now, many modal levels, this is a teaching thing. People have conversations in their head. You never live in your head. You have often said, don't run space in your head. I say, don't live in your head. If you say it out loud, it becomes so much easier to become an adaptable you where you own it. And then you can adjust to the change. Has there been any parts of this that has been harder than others? There were a couple of times where I've gotten out of the car and go, Oh, I've got to go get my mask and he'd go to the store. just really swimming was my anchor to my sanity every Monday morning was I swim and it's my moment to vege and to let my mind wander because when I'm swimming, I don't have to think breathing becomes autonomous. And I miss that and it became a, what am I going to do? Just replace this. So I don't feel. Something is lacking. You know, we've been through times in our lives here where our lives have been disrupted. This is not the first time we went through hurricane say, Andy, for hurricane Sandy. We went with the blackout of August. I think it was three. Yeah. We went through nine 11, you know, so we're adults who have learned to adjust to these things. If we are on a. With ourselves. And we say, this is a change. Let me figure out how I'm going to approach it. I mean, maybe it's a teacher mindset where we plan things and we go, wow. Lessons go sideways. What is your B plan? If the lesson doesn't work or the technology goes down at what, what percentage of your surviving do you think, uh, exercises played a role. 50% of it. And the other 50% is talking to my wife. My wife, Janet is an incredible person who. When we started dating, I was in a bad mood and I said, tonight, I'm going to bed. And she goes, no, you're staying right here. And you're talking to me. Yeah, that was the moment I realized I'm marrying this woman. So having that partner, having she does for me, what you do for me, what I do for you, you know, that echo chamber that will call you on your bullshit. Right. And that's been half of it. And we do that for each other. You do that for me. And such and such. Yeah. But the exercises you're alluding to is definitely a big, big component. I'm going to get stir crazy. If I sit too long, ah, I got the bike set up in the garage. I'm going to go, I'm going to watch some Netflix episodes and you know, I'm going to binge it all pedal and I'll burn off the energy and I'll, it'll kick up the endorphins and yeah, I'll get the brain, make it its own serotonin and. And I'm focused. I know that we've always thought about trying to improve every race let's get faster. Let's get faster. Do you think that we all get a pass this year? That as long as we just get out and do something it's okay. Are you asking your friend or your coach? Cause we get two answers. I'm asking you, I'm asking as a, as one human being to another. Hmm. I think this has been an incredible opportunity for us. You know, there are people like losing their shit. Dude, my raise seasons. Oh my God. I'm looking at this. Wow. We just took a three month build up to Ironman training and turn it into another 12 months. How much stronger can we get? How much more mental break can we get between the workouts? I always build in those gaps because life happens. How much more time. Can we remind our family, Hey, thank you for supporting me in this. And it doesn't have to be triathletes cause you know the joke about triathletes. I didn't know when one walks into a bar. Yeah, exactly. It can be anything you're passionate about this. Get this moment gives us an opportunity to reflect step back and not be rushing to a place because so many people were furloughed or working from home that, you know what we get to remember why we got it. Into a relationship with the people we're living with. Yep. Well, I'll leave it at that. You know, David's, it's funny, your, your premise of, Hey, we were doing so much, we're trying, and yet you ran with me this morning at 6:00 AM and I noticed that you also did another 5k, uh, just, uh, just the 10:45 AM. So, you know, I take everything you say with a grain of salt, but I am so glad that you came on and talked to us today. Thank you so much. I appreciate it. Um, you have a new website, don't you? What's the link. Ah, you can tell them, Peter, what is the link to Dave triathlon website? It is trying, I believe it's try coach david.com. Correct. And you can go and see what David's doing and, and if you're ever thinking, Hey, can I do an iron man? Well, as I'm living proof, you certainly can. And David will get you through it from no matter where you are in the world's pretty good. So I'll leave you with this final thought for what you just said. Yeah, it doesn't have to, you don't have to do an iron man. Did you ever want to learn how to run? Did you ever think maybe I just want to be comfortable in the water, not panic. Some of the things I do as a coach. Yeah, yeah, yeah. But I take, take people I'd make them into Ironman. I turn it into marathoners, but I also just take people who wants to learn how to ride a bicycle. We want to feel positive about themselves, who is that? I've always been scared. I help you get through that fear by helping you in a comfortable situation, realized there's nothing to fear here. As the ancient Greek said, you already know everything. You need to know. That's awesome. What a great way to end it. You already know everything you need to know. David. Thank you so much for taking the time, man. We'll talk to you again soon. Hi. Okay. Bye bye guys, guys. Thanks for listening. As always, you're listening to that's the normal. We appreciate it. We're here. Sorry about David's. Apparently he was, he was in the middle of the forest or something run. Sorry. I missed the activity there, but we appreciate you being here. Thank you for listening. And as always be like, we heard these review on iTunes. Tell your friends. If you have any guests that you want us to join, that you wanna join us, let us know. We'd love to have them otherwise. We'll see you next week. My name is Peter Shankman. Thanks for listening.    You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal Podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play. And of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman. And you can find me www.petershankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice? That'll leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews for more, the podcasts is shown and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were performed by Steven Byrom and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week.
New York native Eric D’Alessandro has always found his place in the spotlight. His passion for comedy is equally credited to his creative mindset, as well as his big Italian family which inspires his raw comedic sketches and uncensored,relatable rhetoric.  Having grown up with a camera in his hand, Eric created a YouTube channel where he developed his comedic skills from a young age. Through his sketches which feature original characters like “Maria Marie,” as well as impressions of celebrities like Drake and comedic covers of popular songs, his YouTube platform helped Eric build a loyal fanbase. The millions of views on his videos laid the groundwork for Eric to gain over 98k followers on Instagram. Through social media, Eric is able to share original, timely and relatable content for the everyday American. A pivotal moment in Eric’s career was when he moved cross-country to Los Angeles in order to pursue his passion as a creator. California has helped Eric generate a new fanbase that lies beyond the five boroughs, as well as provide him with a slew of new content, the major being the comparison of East Coast and West Coast lifestyles. Eric has sold out every show he has headlined, including 1,300 seats at New Jersey’s iPlay America and has been featured on multiple podcasts and TV shows. Most notably, Eric was featured in the 2016 drama/mystery movie Nerve, alongside Emma Roberts and Dave Franco, in part because the film’s directors added him to the script after seeing his viral videos. When Eric isn’t creating his comedic content, he is exploring the opportunities he once dreamed of, including acting, producing, writing and directing. Today we learn how he came to grips with his Generalized Anxiety Disorder, how he uses his platform to benefit the conversation on mental health awareness, and how he chose Comedy, Acting and being a Creator as his career, enjoy! ***CORONA VIRUS EDITION*** In this episode Peter & Eric discuss: 1:04-  Intro & welcome Eric D’Alessandro!   2:22-  How and why did you start doing stand-up? 3:30-  What was school like for you and did your Comedy help you?  5:00-  A lot of Comedians have discussed being neurodiverse; did you ever look back and question your choice of Comedy? 6:25-  On Robin Williams, Drugs, and live performing 7:30-  How do you feel after performing?  12:30-  What’s the goal/your career goal within the Arts and Comedy? 13:43-  Mental Health has seen a little more of the spotlight in the last few years; especially due to folks in the Arts speaking up and sharing. Given your platform, do you now feel even more responsible to talk about stuff?  Ref:  Feels CBD Oil video on Anxiety 17:05-  What would you tell someone who realizes that they may be neurodiverse; but does not have the same, or even a similar support group and background to yours? Ref:  Gary Gulman’s “The Great Depresh” special on HBO 19:00-  Thanks so much Eric! This has been great! How can people find you, and where can we catch your act?  @ericdalessandro on INSTA  Twitter  YouTube  Cameo  FB and via his website:  https://www.ericdalessandro.com   19:55-  Thank you Eric for joining us today! And thank YOU for subscribing, reviewing and listening. Your reviews are working! Even if you’ve reviewed us before, would you please write even a short one for this episode? Each review that you post helps to ensure that word will continue to spread, and that we will all be able to reach & help more people! You can always reach me via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterThanNormal on all of the socials. We have a new sister video cast called 20MinutesInLockdown! A video podcast devoted to learning fascinating lessons from interesting humans all around the world, all in 20 minutes or less!  20 Minutes in Lockdown was born in early April of 2020, when we were in fact, in lockdown, and couldn’t do much of anything. Realizing that more than ever, people could benefit from learning from people outside of their comfort zone – people with interesting stories to tell, people with good advice, people with useful ideas that could help improve lives, we started hosting short Facebook video interviews, and we grew from there. (Plus, you can actually see my hair colors change before your very eyes!) Check it out:  www.20MinutesInLockdown.com STAY HEALTHY - STAY SAFE - STAY HOME.. until next time! 20:20-  Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits As always, leave us a comment below and please drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven’t already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse! Do you know of anyone you think should be on the FTN podcast? Shoot us a note, we’d love to hear!
Deitra is a single mom from the Scranton area who’s living and loving life! Growing up, like most kids with ADHD, school was really rough for her. She was diagnosed with ADHD at around age ten after a lot of fighting her mother performed on her behalf. That experience instilled a drive and passion within her to help others. She currently works as a Certified Nursing Assistant at Wesley village in Pittston, PA. Now a mother to a 7 year old daughter who has a passion for the Arts, and especially for theater and singing. She is grateful for all of the support she receives from coworkers family and close friends- it takes a village! She says it’s good to know that people are seeing just how awesome is it to be Faster Then Normal! Today we learn about her journey and what all she’s doing to stay SANE during these historic times. Enjoy!   ***CORONA VIRUS EDITION***   In this episode Peter & Deitra discuss: 1:04-  Intro & welcome Deitra Banning!  1:54-  You are a normal person- but you wouldn’t be without your daily routines. Tell us about your story with ADHD. 2:45-  Was ADHD even a “thing” when you were growing up? 3:20-  What kinds of push-back did your mother encounter when she wanted to get you tested? 3:52-  You are a Certified Nursing Assistant and a single Mom. How do you keep your structure and routines working, especially right now? 5:27-  How are you talking to your daughter about everything that’s going on? 6:05-  Have you and your daughter talked about your ADHD? 9:30-  What kinds of things are you doing other than your early morning workouts to keep your ADHD employed as a super power? 10:28-  What do you do for fun? 10:50-  What advice would you give to anyone who is feeling overwhelmed? 11:20-  Thank you Deitra! How can people find you?  @BanningDeitra on INSTA 11:54-  Thank you Deitra Banning for joining us today! And thank YOU for subscribing, reviewing and listening. Your reviews are working! Even if you’ve reviewed us before, would you please write even a short one for this episode? Each review that you post helps to ensure that word will continue to spread, and that we will all be able to reach & help more people! You can always reach me via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterThanNormal on all of the socials. We have a new sister video cast called 20MinutesInLockdown! A video podcast devoted to learning fascinating lessons from interesting humans all around the world, all in 20 minutes or less!  20 Minutes in Lockdown was born in early April of 2020, when we were in fact, in lockdown, and couldn’t do much of anything. Realizing that more than ever, people could benefit from learning from people outside of their comfort zone – people with interesting stories to tell, people with good advice, people with useful ideas that could help improve lives, we started hosting short Facebook video interviews, and we grew from there. (Plus, you can actually see my hair colors change before your very eyes!) Check it out:  www.20MinutesInLockdown.com STAY HEALTHY - STAY SAFE - STAY HOME.. until next time! 12:14-  Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits As always, leave us a comment below and please drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven’t already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse! Do you know of anyone you think should be on the FTN podcast? Shoot us a note, we’d love to hear!
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Creator Details

Birthdate
Aug 6th, 1972
Location
New York, NY, USA
Episode Count
197
Podcast Count
3
Total Airtime
2 days, 20 hours
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 253498