Scott Tobias is a freelance writer, editor of Oscilloscope’s Musings blog and co-hosts The Next Picture Show Podcast.
Recent episodes featuring Scott Tobias
#204: Breaking Up Is Hard To Do, Pt. 2 - Marriage Story
Released 40 years after Robert Benton’s Best Picture-winning KRAMER VS. KRAMER, Noah Baumbach’s latest, MARRIAGE STORY, depicts a process that hasn’t grown any easier in the intervening time, but has certainly become less novel. After discussing whether Baumbach’s portrayal of modern divorce might actually be a stealth feel-good movie, and which three of its many great scenes make the film, we get into the shared nuances that connect these two films across the decades, from their portrayal of the legal mechanism of divorce to how gender roles play into their respective depictions of day-to-day parenting and the trials of shared custody. Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your cinematic radar.Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about KRAMER VS. KRAMER, MARRIAGE STORY, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.Your Next Picture Show:• Tasha: Alma Har’el’s HONEY BOY• Keith: John Badham’s DRACULA• Scott: Mads Brügger’s COLD CASE HAMMARSKJÖLDOutro music: Rilo Kiley, “Breakin Up” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
#203: Breaking Up Is Hard To Do, Pt. 1 - Kramer vs Kramer
Noah Baumbach’s acclaimed new family drama MARRIAGE STORY has invited comparisons to Robert Benton’s acclaimed 1979 family drama KRAMER VS. KRAMER over the films’ shared preoccupation with the end of love and the challenges of finding happiness while also doing right by the next generation. We’ll dig into the nuances of that comparison via this pairing, beginning with a discussion of how KRAMER VS. KRAMER balances, or doesn’t, its portrayal of divided parenting, why its ending feels like a cop-out, how the film’s style and performances contribute to a sense of intimacy, and how our knowledge of what went into those performances behind the scenes shifts that effect. Plus, we tackle a listener’s big, two-part question about metaphors and second viewings.Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about KRAMER VS. KRAMER, MARRIAGE STORY, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.Outro music: “D-I-V-O-R-C-E” by Tammy Wynette Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
#202: Hitler Heil-arity, Pt. 2: Jojo Rabbit
Our brief, incomplete history of cinema’s attempts to make comedy out of Adolf Hitler brings us to the present day and writer-director Taika Waititi’s discussion-generating “anti-hate satire” JOJO RABBIT, which doesn’t share much in the way of thematic material with our last film, Mel Brooks’ THE PRODUCERS, but does exhibit a similar eagerness to paint the führer as an object of ridicule. We discuss whether JOJO succeeds in walking the tricky tonal tightrope it sets itself on, and try to locate the precise nature of the controversy the film has invited, on our way to discussing what it shares with THE PRODUCERS not just in its depiction of Hitler, but also how both films present insecure and anxious figures under the sway of terrible mentors, and how both engage, to different extremes, with the idea of women as playthings. Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your cinematic radar.Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE PRODUCERS, JOJO RABBIT, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. Your Next Picture Show: • Genevieve: Taika Waititi’s BOY• Scott: Disney’s PERRI (1957)• Genevieve: Jérémy Clapin’s I LOST MY BODYOutro Music: The Beatles, “Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand”**Thanks Skillshare. Get 2 months of unlimited access at Skillshare.com/nextpicture.** Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
#201: Hitler Heil-arity, Pt 1 - The Producers (1967)
Take Waititi’s new “anti-hate satire” JOJO RABBIT extends a cinematic tradition of casting Adolf Hitler as a buffoon that goes back to Charlie Chaplin, though Mel Brooks’ 1967 debut feature THE PRODUCERS is ultimately more concerned with the question of how to contextualize the very idea of laughing at Hitler. In this half of our pairing, we debate the extent to which Brooks’ rock-solid premise — in which a producer and an accountant bank on audiences being turned off by a musical called “Springtime For Hitler,” only to discover they find it hilarious — and the presence of Gene Wilder makes up for the bumpy ride that is the rest of THE PRODUCERS, and what it’s ultimately saying about how we as audience members are able to view Hitler. Plus, we tackle some feedback about the state of the movie trailer in 2019.Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE PRODUCERS, JOJO RABBIT, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.Show NotesWorks Cited:• “Screen: ‘The Producers’ at Fine Arts,” review by Renata Adler, The New York Times archive, 3/19/1968• “Terminator 2 and the world’s biggest spoiler,” by Tasha Robinson (thedissolve.com)Outro music: “Springtime For Hitler” by Mel Brooks Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
#200: Family Matters, Pt. 2 - Parasite
Bong Joon-ho’s new PARASITE feels weirdly similar to his 2006 film THE HOST, even though there’s no monster in sight — unless you count entitlement, inequality, and greed as monsters, which given how they shape PARASITE’s story, maybe you should. But it also features the return of Song Kang-ho as a father figure, albeit a more capable and traditional one, and a story shaped by Bong’s obsessions with family bonds and duty. In this half of our Bong pairing, we look at all the other things these two films share, from their thematic and visual fixation on high and low spaces, to how they utilize humor ranging from the slapstick to the ultra-dark. Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your cinematic radar.Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE HOST, PARASITE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. Show NotesWorks Cited:• “Bong Joon-ho on Weaving His Personal Memories Into Parasite,” by Karen Han (polygon.com)Your Next Picture Show: • Scott: Pedro Almodóvar’s PAIN & GLORY• Keith: Craig Brewer’s DOLEMITE IS MY NAME• Tasha: Nick Tomnay’s THE PERFECT HOST• Genevieve: Dexter Fletcher’s ROCKETMANOutro Music: Ray Charles, “Them That Got” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Stats
Episode Count
243
Podcast Count
2
Total Airtime
1 week, 2 days