All the podcast episodes I've heard

A curated episode list by
Profile Owner
Seroon
Creation Date April 30th, 2019
Updated Date Updated May 14th, 2019
 Be the first to like this!
English and german Podcasts with varying Themes. Science Friday Episodes are missing. I heard a lot Episodes especially from Auf ein Bier und Einsatz für Pixel before, but didn't tracked them.

The Bawdy House Riots of 1668

  • over 3 years ago

In early modern London, there was a tradition of sorts where apprentices would amass on holidays and physically destroy brothels. One of the largest such riot took place during Easter week in 1668, and it was a complicated event.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

China's Millennials Are Changing the World

  • 11 days ago

Where are there more millennials than in North America, Europe and the Middle East combined, who are vastly different from their parents' generation? China, of course. Kevin Hamlin reports on how these young people are redefining the world's second-biggest economy -- and also the world.  Host Stephanie Flanders then turns to Andrew Browne, head of Bloomberg's New Economy Forum, and Bloomberg chief economist Tom Orlik for their perspective what makes Chinese millennials special and the impact they will have. Finally, Bloomberg senior trade reporter Shawn Donnan returns to Stephanomics to talk about the latest developments in the U.S.-China tariff war.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

Brick

  • 14 days ago

'I found Rome a city of bricks and left it a city of marble,' Caesar Augustus apparently boasted. If so, he wasn’t the only person to dismiss the humble brick. They’ve housed us for tens of thousands of years. They are all rather similar – small enough to fit into a human hand, and half as wide as they are long – and they are absolutely everywhere. Why, asks Tim Harford, are bricks still such an important building technology, how has brickmaking changed over the years, and will we ever see a robot bricklayer?

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

Babbage: Uber traffic

  • 12 days ago

As Uber prepares for its public listing this week, a new study in San Francisco shows that ride-hailing companies cause major road congestion. Also, how much should smart speakers see as well as hear? And, author Douglas Rushkoff explains why he views modern technology as anti-human. Kenneth Cukier hosts

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

Bit Flip

  • 12 days ago

Back in 2003 Belgium was holding a national election. One of their first where the votes would be cast and counted on computers. Thousands of hours of preparation went into making it unhackable. And when the day of the vote came, everything seemed to have gone well. That was, until a cosmic chain of events caused a single bit to flip and called the outcome into question. Today on Radiolab, we travel from a voting booth in Brussels to the driver's seat of a runaway car in the Carolinas, exploring the massive effects tiny bits of stardust can have on us unwitting humans. This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler and Annie McEwen.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  And check out our accompanying short video Bit Flip: the tale of a Belgian election and a cosmic ray that got in the way. This video was produced by Simon Adler with illustration from Kelly Gallagher.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

Monumental Lies (Rebroadcast)

  • 16 days ago

Myths of the Civil War and slavery are being kept alive at Confederate monuments, where visitors hear stories of “benevolent slave owners” and enslaved people “contented with their lot.”  Plus, an artist finds herself in the middle of the creation of New Mexico’s most controversial historical monument. * *Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

'Never Look Away' Asks: Why Make Art? Who Is It For?

  • 2 months ago

The film 'Never Look Away' is about a painter who is first exposed to modern art as child growing up in Nazi Germany. His aunt takes him to an exhibit of modern art curated by Nazis, meant to show what degenerate art looks like — the kind of art the Nazis banned. By the time the boy becomes an art student, Russian communists have taken over East Germany where he lives, and all art is expected to be propaganda, showing images of happy working people. Later, he flees to West Germany and attends an art school known to be avant garde. The artists there consider representational painting—the kind of painting he does—to be obsolete. Implicit in the movie are questions like: Why make art? And who is it for? The movie is inspired by the life of Gerhard Richter, one of the most famous German painters of his generation. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, who wrote and directed the film, spoke with Terry Gross.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

Charged | Ep 1: Born In Brooklyn

  • about 1 month ago

The mayor of New York deals with a big political problem by creating a new court in Brooklyn. Two men, born 25 years and a few blocks apart in Brooklyn, take entirely different paths to meet at that court—one as a defendant and the other as the district attorney. This episode is sponsored by Audible. Start listening with a 30-day Audible trial and your first audiobook plus two Audible Originals are free. Visit audible.com/CHARGED or text CHARGED to 500-500

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

Blood and Power in the Philippines

  • 2 months ago

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte makes his own rules. His war on drugs has led to the deaths of thousands of alleged drug users and dealers. His violent rhetoric and rape jokes have shocked people around the world. Yet he’s hugely popular. Reporter Aurora Almendral delves into what made him the leader he is today. Her investigation starts in his hometown in the Philippines.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

Article 13's Potential Impact On The Music Industry

  • 17 days ago

Episode #154 : While little attention was given by the U.S. population at large, the creative class, and musicians in particular, paid close attention to the wars waged over the EU’s new copyright directive, known colloquially as Article 13. Although is has yet to be ratified, and passed into law by its member states, Article 13 has the potential to close the “safe harbor” loophole for UGC giants like YouTube, Soundcloud, etc., which would make them wholly responsible, and liable, for all previously copyrighted material published on their platforms. Since these changes to EU law will affect the way these global brands do business, there’s a good chance that changes in the European market will trickle out across the world, to the benefit of musicians and creators everywhere. On this episode, we hear from Helen Smith of Impala, Crispin Hunt of the Ivors Academy, and attorney Chris Castle. This episode is sponsored by DISCO! Go to disco.ac/future for a free trial and 20% off with code: future

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 05/2019.
decorative element

Bicycle

  • 28 days ago

The bicycle was to prove transformative. Cheaper than a horse, it freed women and young working class people to roam free. And the bike was the testing ground for countless improvements in manufacturing that would later lead to Henry Ford’s production lines. Tim Harford considers whether the bicycle has had its day, or whether it’s a technology whose best years lie ahead.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Cellies

  • almost 2 years ago

At San Quentin State Prison, the typical cell measures approximately 4’ x 9’ and contains a bunk bed, toilet, sink, two men, and their six cubic feet of belongings. In our first episode of Ear Hustle, hear stories of negotiating this space and the relationships that come with living in such close quarters.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Note to Self is Back and We Start with The Big One: Kids and Screens

  • 27 days ago

The tech show about being human returns with an all new season. Host Manoush Zomorodi kicks things off with the latest on the battle between kids and parents over their screens: do we know how kids are impacted by tech? Does it make them less empathetic? Are they being constantly bullied online? Even if we can help kids figure out their digital habits, are we adults totally screwed? Researcher Elizabeth Englander joins Manoush to share new findings and give the most pragmatic advice about how kids and adults can build better relationships with their tech and each other.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

117: What if you didn't know what was wrong with you?

  • 8 months ago

“Not knowing, not having control over my body, and not having control over the narrative of everyone around me…it’s the worst feeling to have to go through this by yourself.” Producer: Whit Missildinethisisactuallyhappening.comInstagram: @actuallyhappeningIntro Music: "Illabye" - Tipper Music Bed: “Union Flow” - SpunticOutro Music: "The Moon is Down" - El Diablo & Adam Schraft (Rojo y Negro) @eldiablosf @rojo-y-negro www.eldiablobass.com/

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Haber-Bosch Process

  • over 2 years ago

Saving lives with thin air - by taking nitrogen from the air to make fertiliser, the Haber-Bosch Process has been called the greatest invention of the 20th Century – and without it almost half the world’s population would not be alive today. Tim Harford tells the story of two German chemists, Fritz Haber and Carl Bosch, figured out a way to use nitrogen from the air to make ammonia, which makes fertiliser. It was like alchemy; 'Brot aus Luft', as Germans put it, 'Bread from air'. Haber and Bosch both received a Nobel prize for their invention. But Haber’s place in history is controversial – he is also considered the 'father of chemical warfare' for his years of work developing and weaponising chlorine and other poisonous gases during World War One. Producer: Ben Crighton Editors: Richard Knight and Richard Vadon (Photo: A farmer sprays fertiliser. Credit: Remy Gabalda/Getty Images)

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Diesel Engine

  • over 2 years ago

Rudolf Diesel died in mysterious circumstances before he was able to capitalise on his extraordinary invention: the eponymous engine that powers much of the world today. Before Diesel invented his engine in 1892, as Tim Harford explains, the industrial landscape was very different. Urban transport depended on horses and steam supplied power for trains and factories. Incredibly, Diesel’s first attempt at a working engine was more than twice as efficient as other engines which ran on petrol and gas, and he continued to improve it. Indeed, it wasn’t long before it became the backbone of the industrial revolution; used in trains, power stations, factories and container ships. Producer: Ben Crighton Editors: Richard Knight and Richard Vadon (Image: Stamp depicting Rudolf Diesel, Credit: Boris15/Shutterstock)

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

More Perfect: Sex Appeal

  • 4 months ago

With Ruth Bader Ginsburg in the news and on the big screen recently, we decided to play the More Perfect show about her from back in November of 2017. This is the story of how Ginsburg, as a young lawyer at the ACLU, convinced an all-male Supreme Court to take discrimination against women seriously - using a case on discrimination against men.  This episode was reported by Julia Longoria. Special thanks to Stephen Wiesenfeld, Alison Keith, and Bob Darcy. Supreme Court archival audio comes from Oyez®, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Fund while it lasted: the 1MDB scandal

  • about 2 months ago

Today Malaysia’s former prime minister faces his first of several trials, for alleged involvement in the disappearance of billions of dollars from 1MDB, a state-run fund. Businesses also endure their share of scandals, too—the latest one surrounding the maker of OxyContin, a maligned opioid drug. But why are so many recent corporate scandals coming out of America? And, a fabulously popular Chinese soap challenges deeply held notions of filial duty.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Levelling the Playing Field: A Look at the Spotify-Apple feud

  • about 1 month ago

The battle over the App Store is far from over: In March Spotify launched Time to Play Fair, a website outlining how Apple mistreats companies like Spotify by charging excessive fees, blocking upgrades and promoting its own services in its App Store. Shortly after, Apple fired back in a press release, making the case that Spotify’s claims are misleading This week, Paul and Rich weigh in on the squabble. Is Apple really muscling in on Spotify? How symbiotic is their relationship? Why is Spotify making this case now? What are the implications of opting into the platform economy? Links: Spotify's Time to Play Fair Apple ‘Addressing Spotify’s claims’

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

A Job for the Boys

  • about 2 months ago

Women once made up 80% of the computer industry. They are now less than 20%. Mary Ann Sieghart explores the hidden and disturbing consequences of not having women at the heart of the tech. Who is the in room today when technology is designed determines how society is being shaped. Justine Cassell, from Carnegie Mellon University, says young men in Silicon Valley are told, “Design for you. Design what you would want to use” and so virtual assistants, such as the ever-female Siri, Alexa and Cortana play with “cute talk” and female game characters still have their “tits hanging out of their blouses.” Artificial Intelligence is now making life-changing choices for us - about our health, our loans, even bail. But it isn’t faultless; it is biased. AI is only as good as the data it’s been fed and if it’s learning from prejudice, it will only amplify it. Apps designed by men are overlooking women’s health, algorithms are rejecting women outright and as MIT Professor Catherine Tucker explains, they aren’t even being sent jobs adverts “because their eyeballs are more expensive.” Mary Ann looks at why women left the computer industry and what still deters them today. She hears the challenges that tech entrepreneur Steve Shirley faced in the 1960s are almost identical to those voiced by organisers of the Google walkout last year. Women are harassed, side lined and not taken seriously; they are put off by a cult of genius and techno-chauvinism. But there is hope. Mary Ann meets campaigners trying to regulate AI gender bias and those succeeding in getting more women into tech, finding a small tweak in classroom design or style of university marking can make a real difference. Producer: Sarah Bowen.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Chasing Paper in a Digital World

  • about 1 month ago

Beyond metaphors and into the digital future : In 1973, Xerox PARC introduced the Xerox Alto. It was the first computer to support an operating system based on a graphical user interface. This began the desktop metaphor; the computer monitor as if it were the top of the user's desk. Forty-six years later, the metaphor lives on. We talk about files and documents— even when there’s nothing to print. Why are we still hung up on the desktop? Can we imagine a digital future free of off-screen comparisons? Paul and Rich ponder the possibility, and more. Links: Notability (app) DocuSign (app) History of the Xerox Alto

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Babbage: Hypersonic Boom

  • about 1 month ago

America, China and Russia are developing long range, gliding missiles that travel at speeds greater than Mach 5. What are the threats and safeguards? Also, Dame Stephanie Shirley, the programmer who set up Britain’s first all-female software company in 1962, gives advice to women in tech today. And, how to knit a sports car with carbon fibre. Kenneth Cukier hosts

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

#135 Robocall: Bang Bang

  • 4 months ago

This week, Alex investigates the rise of one of the most hated businesses: Robocalls. And Damiano tries to figure out if a robocaller is tracking his every move.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Policing the Police

  • about 2 months ago

California recently passed a law that eliminates some of the barriers to accessing records on egregious police misconduct and deadly use of force. With the floodgates open, journalists, like KPCC investigative reporter Annie Gilbertson, are elated and terrified. Just one police violation can come with hundreds of associated documents for journalists to comb through.  So, instead of fighting tooth and nail for the scoop, over 30 media organizations across the state are teaming up to share resources, bodies and insight as they begin the arduous task of combing through the newly-available records. The coalition is called the California Reporting Project. Bob Garfield talked with Gilbertson about what the project is uncovering.  

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Gyroscope

  • about 1 month ago

When the HMS Victory sank in 1744, with it went an inventor named John Serson and a device he’d dreamed up. He called it the “whirling speculum”, but we now know the basic idea as a gyroscope. Serson thought it could help sailors to navigate when they couldn’t see the horizon. Nowadays gyroscopes are tiny and, as Tim Harford describes, they are used to guide everything from submarines to satellites, from rovers on Mars to the phone in your pocket. They are also integral to drones – a technology that some believe could transform how we do our shopping. But for that, they’ll need to work in all weathers. Image: A gyroscope (Credit: Getty Images)

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Bloomberg Businessweek Weekend - April 6th, 2019

  • about 1 month ago

Hosted by Carol Massar and Jason Kelly.Featuring:-Josh Green on Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s voter organizing app-James Tarmy on Wall Street masking the cost of climate change-Dimitra Kessenides brings us six ways to stop the internet from ruining your day-Rachel Evans with a ’dirty little secret’ with ETFs

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Bad Recommendations

  • about 2 months ago

John Herrman EXPOSES the truth about YouTube’s paranoid style. ToE’s Andrew Callaway DESTROYS Jordan Peterson. (Must listen!!!)

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Where are all the black women in Grime?

  • about 2 months ago

Journalist and Grime fan Yomi Adegoke noticed something lacking when it comes to discovering and enjoying the genre of music she loves. Women who look like her. Whether it’s behind the scenes or at the forefront, black women seem noticeably absent while, in the past 15 years, stars such as Dizzee Rascal, Stormzy, Wiley and Skepta have become mainstream names as the genre grows exponentially, exporting this distinctly British sound internationally from China to the USA. Yomi takes a journey through the music industry to ask some difficult questions. She meets the women who are making waves - including veteran artists Lioness and Shystie, as well as industry insiders and those scrutinising the scene from the outside. She finds that, though significantly outnumbered, black women can be found among the artists, producers, managers and tastemakers, but they lack the profile and representation of their male and/or white counterparts. It's also a problem the industry seems reluctant to address, raising uncomfortable questions indicative of the wider challenges black women face in the UK - colourism and misogynoir. Yomi hears how this inimitable, thriving genre is defined by the artists who make it, and discovers a complex music scene that celebrates its black female artists on the one hand, but hasn’t yet given them the space, profile or support to grow. But are things changing? With contributions from Dr Joy White, Alex 'Twin' Boateng, Jasmine Dotiwala and more. Produced by Sefa Nkyi Mixed by Steve Wyatt A Boom Shakalaka production for BBC Radio 4

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Short Stuff: Unspent Campaign Money

  • about 2 months ago

Have you ever wondered what happens to all those campaign donations when a political campaign goes belly up? Or, even worse, is in debt! Wonder no more! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Never Meet Your (Super) Heroes

  • 8 months ago

There’s a new battlefield in the culture wars: comic books. The alt-right now has gotten in the business, led by a buxom, Confederate flag-waving superhero named Rebel and a white vigilante who turns immigrants over to ICE. Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Twitch And Shout

  • 9 months ago

Twitch.tv is a video streaming platform where tens of thousands people broadcast their lives and video game game-play in real-time. It's like unedited, real, reality TV. This week, On the Media digs into why so many people want to share so much on Twitch, and why the site draws more than 15 million viewers. First, a look at a couple of the biggest streamers of the platform, Ninja and Dr. Disrespect, who command devoted audiences and giant paychecks. Then, Bob dives into the inaugural season of the Overwatch League, the most expensive and highly produced pro gaming venture to date. Finally, Brooke speaks with Radiolab's Jad Abumrad about the life of a homeless streamer who's life was saved by Twitch. 1. Julia Alexander [@loudmouthjulia] and Allegra Frank [@LegsFrank], two writers with Polygon, on the pitfalls and para-social allure of Twitch. Listen. 2. Cecilia D'Anastasio [@cecianasta] a reporter with Kotaku, Saebyeolbe [@saebyeolbe] and Pine [@tf2pine], two pro gamers, and Farzam Kamel, a venture capitalist with Sterling VC, on the inaugural season of the Overwatch League. Listen. 3. Jad Abumrad [@JadAbumrad] of Radiolab and VP Gloves, a homeless Twitch streamer, on the murky ethics of Twitch's IRL (in real life) section. Listen. Correction: The original broadcast of this hour includes the statistic that Twitch draws more viewers than HBO and Netflix. Upon request for comment, Twitch did not offer sufficient information to confirm that figure. 

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

The Myth That Fuels the Anti-Vaxx Agenda

  • 2 months ago

This Tuesday, lawmakers in Washington heard from an 18-year-old who, against all odds, got his shots. Ethan Lindenberger, who fought with his own mother to get vaccinated, told senators, "for my mother, her love, affection, and care as a parent was used to push an agenda to create a false distress." That "anti-vaxx" agenda, the dangerous legacy of a thoroughly debunked 1998 study in the British medical journal Lancet, was dealt yet another devastating — though not mortal — blow this week, courtesy of epidemiologists from Denmark’s Staten Serum Institute. Their new study, which included more than 650,000 children, found that the MMR vaccine did not raise the risk of developing autism.  And yet, even in the face of study after study, and even as websites like Pinterest have moved to stamp out the spread of anti-vaxx materials on their websites, the debunked vaccine-autism link and its impact on public health live on. In this 2012 interview, Brooke spoke with Seth Mnookin, author of The Panic Virus: A True Story of Medicine, Science and Fear, about why these myths persist.  

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Scarlet Letters and Second Chances

  • 3 months ago

As a West Virginia teenager, Amber Miller dropped out of school, took drugs and robbed homes. She wound up on the wrong side of the law and served time for a felony. In a youth correction center, she turned her life around, but after her release, had trouble finding a job to support her two sons. Like 8% of Americans with felony conviction, Amber had to “check the box” on job applications admitting to her criminal past. The felony on her record was like a ‘scarlet letter’ and most employers were reluctant to hire her. Amber was committed to change, but was society willing to give her a second chance? Trey speaks with Amber and West Virginia politicians about the state’s plans for helping felons get back into the workforce.

68: A Way of Seeing The World

  • about 2 months ago

"Stronger Than Hate" is what everyone said in response to the mass shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue. But what does that mean? In this third and final episode in our series from Pittsburgh, we talk to all types of people about who and what is Stronger Than Hate. You can catch up with TTFA on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook using @ttfapodcast. Nora's Instagram is @noraborealis. You can order Nora's new book -- No Happy Endings -- from her website at noraborealis.com/book. TTFA is public media. Which means we are supported by you. You can join us with a contribution at ttfa.org/donate And check out our sponsors this week: Talkspace -- talkspace.com with code TTFA For Hers -- forhers.com/thanks Ritual -- ritual.com/thanks

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Bodies: Goddess

  • over 1 year ago

Maria is a poet and activist living in Houston, Texas who Mitra spent a few days with.  Mitra got to meet some of Maria’s family, hung out with her pets and ate delicious food during her time with Maria. For Maria’s whole life all she has wanted was breasts. Big breasts to be specific. This story follows the poet, Maria from childhood to adolescence to womanhood.  In this piece you heard poetry from book Poetic Confessions Vol 1 and more.  To learn more about Maria’s work you can check out her website. Maria is also the co-founder of The National Women with Disabilities Empowerment Forum.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Blank Slate

  • over 1 year ago

Tofu: vegetarian superfood or toxin-ridden poison? (Spoiler alert: it's neither!)

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

The world ahead: Slow social

  • about 2 months ago

In this episode we discuss why, after years of trying to make their products as addictive as possible, social-media companies are now heading in the opposite direction. We look forward to key dates later this year for elections, Chinese anniversaries and historic figures. And we ask what the former headmaster of Eton College is bringing to China’s educational system. Tom Standage hosts.Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC x 4.0)

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

The Novel

  • 7 months ago

Novels are to entertainment what orange juice is to Coca Cola -- a wholesome alternative to modern vices. Or at least, that's how we think of them now. But long before television and videogames, or before comic books and D&D, novels were the new and scary form of entertainment. They were accused of corrupting the youth, of planting dangerous ideas into the heads of housewives, of and distracting everyone from more serious, important books. In this episode, we explore the roots of anti-novel hysteria, and explore what impact it really did have on us. (And if you're looking for a good novel, check out host Jason Feifer's new novel, Mr. Nice Guy!) Get in touch: Twitter: @pessimistsarc Web: pessimists.co Email: pessimistsarchive@gmail.com Thanks to our sponsor, Element AI, and its podcast The AI Element.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Unicorns Could Mean End of Bull Market, The Riveter Builds Women Workspaces, JPMorgan Job Cuts

  • about 2 months ago

Bloomberg Businessweek Editor Joel Weber and Mike Regan, Senior Editor for Bloomberg Markets Live Blog, discuss the cover story of Businessweek Magazine on how so-called unicorn tech startups going public is spreading fear on Wall Street that the market is near a top. Amy Nelson, Founder of The Riveter, talks about her mission to change the way women are seen as leaders in the workplace. Michael Moore, Bloomberg News Finance Team Leader, explains how automation and new technology are replacing thousands of workers at banks and asset managers around the world. Andy Browne, Editorial Director of the Bloomberg New Economy Forum, discusses why cars will be among the first victims of a tech cold war between the U.S. and China. And we Drive to the Close with Abhay Deshpande, Chief Investment Officer at Centerstone Investors.  Hosts: Carol Massar and Jason Kelly. Producer: Paul Brennan 

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Cellophane

  • about 2 months ago

Plastic food packaging often seems obviously wasteful. But when Jacques Brandenberger invented cellophane, consumers loved it. It helped supermarkets go self-service, and it was so popular Cole Porter put it in a song lyric. Nowadays, people worry that plastic doesn’t get recycled enough but there are two sides to this story. Plastic packaging can protect food from being damaged in transit, and help it stay fresh for longer. Should we care more about plastic waste or food waste? As Tim Harford explains, it isn’t obvious and the issue is complicated enough that our choices at the checkout may accidentally do more harm than good. Producer: Ben Crighton Editor: Richard Vadon (Image: Noodles and cellophane, Credit: Getty Images)

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Didn't Want to Be Conscious (S2: E1)

  • almost 4 years ago

Humans have been getting intoxicated, and finding new ways to get intoxicated, for thousands of years. On this episode, I explore the history of intoxication, and how that history played out in the life of one young woman. Subscribe (or write a review) in iTunes Links: In researching this topic, I relied on the following sources (in addition to Wikipedia): The Beer Archaeologist ‘Apparently Useless’: The Accidental Discovery of LSD The Trip Treatment The Cocoa Crux Heroin: A Hundred-Year Habit Music: "The Dark Glow of the Mountains" by Chris Zabriskie "But Enough About Me, Bill Paxton" by Chris Zabriskie "Take off and Shoot a Zero" by Chris Zabriskie "Dance" by American Residue Records, from Last Foxtrot in Burbank "Black Book" by Ori, remixed by johnny_ripper "Time Stop" by American Residue Records, from Last Foxtrot in Burbank "Hikikomori" by John R. Barner from Hikikomori "Cylinder Seven" by Chris Zabriskie "Cylinder Three" by Chris Zabriskie "Cylinder Nine" by Chris Zabriskie

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

I Was Deprived (S1: E3)

  • over 4 years ago

Tanya grew up in a home with only one approved hour of television a week. She had no music in her bedroom, no cellphone, and no computer access, unless her mother was watching over her shoulder. In Krystyna’s house, on the other hand, the TV was always on, and she could watch whatever she wanted, whenever she wanted. She now worries, as a single mother, that her children have too much access to screens, since she has very little time or energy to monitor their usage. The two women take turns telling their stories about fighting for technological freedom, or technological control, and trying to find some kind of balance. Music: Back to the Start by johnny_ripper from soundtrack for a film that doesn’t exist “Lille” by johnny_ripper from soundtrack for a film that doesn’t exist “Gaël” by johnny_ripper from l’esprit d’escalier A johnny_ripper remix of “Black Book” by Ori from Deximer A johnny_ripper remix of “Enough of Our Machines” by Son Lux from Deximer “A Void” by johnny_ripper from Epilogue

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

S1E10: On Death and Space Clouds

  • about 3 years ago

A short piece for Mother’s Day. Something different that is not part of the First Day Back storyline. Stay tuned for details on Season 2!

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

S1E9: Generations

  • over 3 years ago

What happens when Tally's life starts mirroring the subject of her film? Also she talks to a 97 year-old woman and a Millennial who both reject the idea of "having it all".

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

S1E8: Your Stories

  • almost 4 years ago

In this episode, listeners sent in recordings of themselves talking about work, parenthood and, how hard it is to know what to do with your life, with kids or without.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

S1E7: Good News, Bad News

  • almost 4 years ago

Tally gets news about her film project, compares notes with a friend who didn’t have kids, and hears about her youngest son’s turnaround.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

S1E6: Searching for Sally

  • about 4 years ago

This episode is a little departure. In it, Tally goes looking for a teacher who had a huge impact on her life and career. 

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

S1E5: Curveball

  • about 4 years ago

In this episode, Tally meets her old producer, who cautions her that she is re-entering a different documentary industry than the one she left and Tally’s son Jack throws her a curveball.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

S1E4: Fear and Insecurity in Las Vegas

  • about 4 years ago

An episode about creativity and insecurity. Questions are raised about Tally's ability to jump back in after 6 years off and she talks to a painter who says some things she is afraid to say.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

S1E3: Patti Smith Made Me Feel Better

  • about 4 years ago

What's the difference between taking time off to take care of your kids versus taking that time to travel the world? Tally and her producer discuss it. Also, Patti Smith knows about mothering.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 04/2019.
decorative element

Shaking Up Distribution

  • about 2 months ago

Episode #150: The landscape of independent distribution is rapidly changing. As more independent labels move toward truly independent distribution models, their market share becomes clearer. On this episode, we talk to Chris Welz of Secretly Distribution, Kevin Breuner of CD Baby, and Jim Mahoney of Merlin.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 03/2019.
decorative element

S1E2: This Discussion is Retro

  • over 4 years ago

Tally looks at gender roles in hers and other households and asks her father what feminism means to him. Spoiler alert: he has no clue.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 03/2019.
decorative element

S1E1: Getting Back Out There

  • over 4 years ago

In which Tally lays out her situation and tries to jump-start her filmmaking career, asking big questions to her family members along the way. 

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 03/2019.
decorative element

Coffee

  • over 1 year ago

For 500 years, a succession of kings, sultans, and businessmen have tried to ban or destroy the world’s favorite caffeinated morning pick-me-up. Among their claims: Coffee makes you impotent! It destroys brain tissue! It attacks the nervous system! And most critically of all, it makes you want to take up arms against your government. In this episode, we answer some big questions: Is any of this true? And how did coffee survive centuries of bans, to become today’s best part of waking up? Twitter: @pessimistsarc Online: pessimists.co Email: pessimistsarchive@gmail.com

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 03/2019.
decorative element

Asking for a Friend

  • 3 months ago

Last year, we ran a pair of episodes that explored the greatest mysteries in our listeners’ lives - the big ones, little ones, and the ones in between. This year, we’re back on the hunt, tracking down answers to the big little questions swirling around our own heads. We reached out to some of our favorite people and asked them to come along with us as we journeyed back in time, to outer space, and inside our very own bodies. This episode was reported by Rachael Cusick, Simon Adler, Becca Bressler, and Annie McEwen and was produced by Rachael Cusick, Simon Adler, Matt Kielty, Becca Bressler, and Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.   

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 03/2019.
decorative element

Loan behold: a global-economy danger

  • about 2 months ago

The world has only just recovered from the last global financial shock. But a new trend has economists worried: the rising debt on companies’ balance-sheets. Methamphetamine use is skyrocketing in East Asia; we look into the causes and the effects. And, the surprising rise of “Slovakia’s Erin Brockovich” ahead of the country’s presidential election

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 03/2019.
decorative element

The Military's Deadliest Helicopter

  • 4 months ago

How did one helicopter become the deadliest aircraft in the US military? To find out, Reveal partners with Investigative Studios, the production arm of the Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism. Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 03/2019.
decorative element

127: What if your drive for perfection became your fatal flaw?

  • 3 months ago

Heading to college as a star athlete from a protective family, a man’s perfectionism and drive for self-control leads to a downward spiral. “After like looking in the mirror saying like wow I fucking like hate myself right now…as I got more upset and as time progressed I would go deeper deeper deeper.”Producer: Whit MissildineEditor: Nigel Coutinhothisisactuallyhappening.comInstagram: @actuallyhappeningEpisode Sponsors:  ThirdLove, Uber, CBS/The Good FightIntro Music: "Illabye" - TipperAmbient Themes by Nigel CoutinhoOutro Music: "The Moon is Down" - El Diablo & Adam Schraft (Rojo y Negro) @eldiablosf @rojo-y-negro www.eldiablobass.com/

user avatar

Seroon

Listened to 03/2019.
decorative element