Satchin Panda

A curated episode list by
salkinstitute
Creation Date April 12th, 2019
Updated Date Updated July 3rd, 2019
 Be the first to like this!
Satchin Panda - embracing the circadian rhythm for better health
Live Long and Master Aging
Satchin Panda is a professor at the Salk Institute and a founding executive member of the Center for Circadian Biology at the University of California, San Diego.  Dr. Panda is also the author of a new book, The Circadian Code, in which he explains his theory that our overall health and longevity is affected more by when we eat than what we eat. Timing, he says, is  everything.  Limiting the number of hours during which we consume our meals is pivotal to nurturing the body clock and could help us avoid the chronic diseases of old age, he believes. Dr. Panda’s research is compelling and potentially life-changing.  In this LLAMA podcast interview, with Peter Bowes, he explains what it means to adopt a ‘time-restricted eating’ pattern; why choosing to eat in a shorter time window could help us sleep better and be more alert during the day; and how we can all get involved in a research project cataloging the circadian rhythms of thousands of people around the world.   The Live Long and Master Aging (LLAMA) podcast hacks the aging process. Peter Bowes interviews world-renowned scientists, future thinkers and biohackers, all of whom have a common goal of figuring out how we can live longer and healthier. We also talk to inspiring individuals who have already mastered the aging process. The LLAMA philosophy is that there is much can do to extend our natural health span or the length of time when we enjoy optimal health. We talk a lot about food, fasting, fitness, the brain and good fortune.
Dr. Satchin Panda on Practical Implementation of Time-Restricted Eating & Shift Work Strategies
FoundMyFitness
This is a nearly 2-hour round 2 episode with none other than Dr. Satchin Panda of the Salk Institute! At nearly two hours of dialog, this episode touches on a lot of material but has a special focus on practical implementation of time-restricted eating. Put another way, I kept a list of a lot of questions that seem to keep coming up and present them directly to Satchin. We talk about dealing with shift work, black coffee when fasting, and some of the distinctions between Satchin's approach to time-restricted eating which is influenced by his deep background in circadian biology and more conventional protocols like 16:8 that many people are familiar with. In addition to these important and very practical how-to tidbits, we dive into lots of interesting new territory as well, including... How human anecdote and animal evidence suggests time-restricted feeding may be especially useful for gut-related issues, including inflammatory bowel disease and acid reflux. The fascinating way Dr. Panda is using human anecdote from his trial to ask new scientific questions he wouldn't think to ask and then going back to animal data to figure it out and how this unique approach forms a sort of closed loop pattern: animal → human feedback → back to animal for mechanism. How labs doing caloric restriction research may have actually been reaping the benefits of time-restricted without realizing it as an incidental to their experimental design. The revelation that 70% of FDA drugs are subject to circadian effects and are either less effective or more effective at certain times of the day. The effect melatonin has on the pancreatic production of insulin and the insight this lends to why we should probably stop eating 3-4 hours before we go to bed. The bizarre way circadian rhythms affects everything from susceptibility to UV damage to recovery from surgery to cancer risk. Sign-up for Dr. Panda's mobile app study on time-restricted eating. Grab the full show notes, timeline & glossary from the episode page now. Did you enjoy this podcast? It was brought to you by people like you! Click here to visit our crowdsponsor page where you can learn more about how you can support the podcast for as little or as much as you like.
Satchin Panda, Ph.D. on Time-Restricted Feeding and Its Effects on Obesity, Muscle Mass & Heart Health
FoundMyFitness
Dr. Rhonda Patrick speaks with Dr. Satchin Panda, a professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla California. Satchin's work deals specifically with the timing of food and it's relationship with our biological clocks governed by circadian rhythm and also the circadian rhythm in general. In this video we discuss... The fascinating history of experimentation that ultimately elucidated the location for the region of the brain necessary for a properly timed sleep-wake cycles. The relationship between our body's "master clock" and it's many peripheral clocks. Why infants sleep so intermittently, instead of resting for a longer, sustained duration like healthy young adults... and why this sustained rest also goes haywire in the elderly. The fascinating work Dr. Panda took part in that lead to the discovery of a specialized light receptor in the eye that sets circadian rhythms and is known as melanopsin. The important relationship between the relatively light insensitive melanopsin, which requires around 1,000 lux of light to be fully activated, and its control of the circadian clock by means of activation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and suppression of melatonin. The effects light exposure seems to have on next-day cortisol, a glucocorticoid hormone that regulates around 10-20% of the human protein-encoding genome. The clever experimental design by which Dr. Panda and his colleagues discovered that certain circadian rhythms, especially of the liver, are entrained by when we eat, instead of how much light we get. This underlines the fact that, when managing are circadian rhythm, both elements are important! One of the more surprising effects of time-restricted feeding in mice eating a so-called healthy diet: increases in muscle mass and even endurance in some cases. Interested in trying out time-restricted feeding? Don't let your data points go to waste! You can try out time-restricted feeding and have a real impact on human research! Commit to 14 weeks and download Dr. Panda's mobile app to get started. Learn more at: mycircadianclock.org/participant
#21 Why When You Eat Matters with Professor Satchin Panda PART 1
Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee
Dr Chatterjee talks to Professor Satchidananda Panda of the Salk Institute in California, a leading expert in the field of circadian rhythm and whose research is transforming our lives everyday worldwide.Show notes available at: drchatterjee.com/TRFFollow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
#22 Why When We Eat Matters with Professor Satchin Panda PART 2
Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee
Dr Chatterjee talks to Professor Satchidananda Panda of the Salk Institute in California, a leading expert in the field of circadian rhythm and whose research is transforming everyday lives worldwide.Show notes for part 2 available at drchatterjee.com/pandaFollow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Eating times essential to healthy diet and nutrition - Dr Satchin Panda
RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Restricting our eating hours could be key to curbing obesity, kidney disease, high cholesterol, bad sleeping, joint pain, possibly even cancer, according to recent research.
The Circadian Code with Satchin Panda
Falling Through the Cracks: Feel alive and thrive
There is a symphony of complex systems going on in our body and in our organs that are taking care of us. Satchin Panda is discussing how to take care of these systems, and work at an optimal cicadian rhythm for your body, and why it’s so important.
13: The Power of Time-Restricted Eating aka Intermittent Fasting | Satchin Panda, PhD
The Genius Life
Dr. Satchin Panda is a professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and one of the leading researchers in the areas of time-restricted eating and circadian biology and genetics. For full show notes, head to: http://maxlugavere.com/podcast/satchin-panda
Episode 79: Satchin Panda discusses circadian rhythms and time-restricted eating to improve health and even reverse disease
STEM-Talk
Dr. Satchin Panda is a professor and researcher at the Salk Institute who has become recognized as one of the world’s leading experts on circadian rhythm. In today’s wide-ranging interview, he discusses how the body’s natural day-night cycle can help us improve our health, get a better night’s sleep and lose weight. He also shares how adopting a lifestyle that is aligned with the body’s natural internal clock can even help us prevent and reverse disease. Satchin also has been generating significant attention for his research into the health benefits of time-restricted eating. He is the author of “The Circadian Code” and in today’s interview he shares how listeners can become involved in a research project he and his colleagues are conducting through a smartphone app called My Circadian Clock. In addition to his work at the Salk Institute, Satchin is also a founding executive member of the Center for Circadian Biology at the University of California, San Diego.  Key topics covered in today’s interview include: [00:03:46] How a rapidly evolving modern society disrupts the interconnectedness of our biological rhythms. [00:13:41] How Satchin became interested in circadian rhythms and metabolism. [00:17:11] Satchin’s first mouse study on time-restricting feeding, which so surprised him that he ended up repeating the study three times. [00:21:37] The role of ketosis in time-restricted eating, particularly in regard to weight loss and potential health benefits. [00:25:01] Whether having black coffee signals the beginning of a person’s eating window. [00:27:31] The potential use of caffeine to treat jet lag induced by international time-zone travel. [00:29:31] Satchin’s mouse studies that looked at obesity and type-2 diabetes. [00:30:58] The dangers of shift work and the importance of sleep. [00:45:39] Satchin talks about the importance of darkness when it comes to sleep and our circadian rhythms. [00:48:42] Satchin’s 2017 paper in Aging Research Reviews titled “ Circadian rhythms, time-restricted feeding, and healthy aging.“ [00:51:59] Satchin’s recent paper in Cell Metabolism, “Time-Restricted Feeding Prevents Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome in Mice Lacking a Circadian Clock.” [01:00:19] The role of diet in people who lost weight during time-restricted feeding. [01:06:30] “My Circadian Clock,”an app Satchin and his lab at Salk Institute have developed. [01:20:02] Satchin discusses how he convinced his mother to try time-restricted eating. [01:25:32] What Satchin’s diet and eating window looks like on a typical day.  Show notes: [00:03:05] Satchin begins the interview talking about being raised in India and his parents’ expectation that he would become a doctor or engineer. [00:03:46] Satchin talks about his book “The Circadian Code,” which is dedicated to his maternal and paternal grandparents. He touches on how a rapidly evolving modern society disrupts the interconnectedness of our biological rhythms. [00:06:14] Satchin shares how when he was a junior in high school, he lost his father in an accident with a truck driver. [00:07:21] Dawn asks Satchin to talk about how going to agricultural school like his father did cemented Satchin’s interest in science. [00:08:44] Dawn asks how Satchin ended up with a research job at a flavor and fragrance manufacturer in India after finishing his master’s degree. [00:10:10] Satchin talks about what led him to Canada and eventually the U.S. [00:11:21] Ken asks Satchin why he decided to pursue at Ph.D. in plant circadian rhythm. [00:13:41] The circadian rhythm field primarily focuses on understanding the timing mechanism in biological systems like plants, fruit flies, mice and humans.  Satchin discusses how he took a different route and became interested in circadian rhythms and metabolism. [00:15:13] Dawn asks what it is like to work at the Salk institute, a place where Nobel laureates such as Francis Crick once worked. [00:17:11] Satchin talks about his first time-restricted feeding mouse study, which so surprised him that he repeated the study three times. [00:19:03] Ken asks Satchin what he was expecting to learn when he started the mouse studies. [00:20:06] Dawn asks about Satchin’s published findings of his experiments in 2012, which raised the question of whether eight hours was the magic number for time-restricted eating. [00:21:37] Knowing that people go into ketosis after 12 to 16 hours without food, Dawn asks if Satchin has looked at the role of ketosis in time-restricted eating, particularly in regard to weight loss and potential health benefits. [00:22:39] In the mouse studies, the mice that followed time-restricted eating also had an endurance benefit. Dawn asks if Satchin thinks this might also be related to ketosis. [00:25:01] Satchin says in his book, “The moment you eat breakfast, or have your first cup of coffee or tea, is the beginning of your eating window.” Dawn points out that Satchin also says in the book that water doesn’t signal the start of the eating window. She then asks about black coffee, which, like water, has no calories. [00:27:31] Ken asks about the potential use of caffeine to treat jet lag induced by international time-zone travel. [00:29:31] Satchin talks about mouse studies his lab did a few years ago that looked at obesity and type-2 diabetes. [00:30:58] Satchin discusses the point he makes in his book about the dangers of shift work and the importance of sleep. [00:35:11] Dawn asks about a study Satchin is currently undertaking looking at firefighters and shift work. [00:38:10] Numerous studies have shown that time restricted feeding schedules may be able to shift the phase of activity in animals such as mice. Ken asks what Satchin thinks the underlying mechanisms of this may be. [00:40:56] In his book, Satchin mentions that chronotypes — the existence of night owls and morning larks — are largely a myth. Ken asks if we really know whether chronotypes exist or not. [00:44:14] Satchin talks about how he responded when, while at a symposium in Stockholm, a well-respected scientist in the area of obesity came up to Satchin after his talk and said there was no data that shift work causes more disease. [00:45:39] Satchin talks about the importance of darkness when it comes to sleep and our circadian rhythm. [00:48:42] Satchin’s 2017 paper in Aging Research Reviews titled “ Circadian rhythms, time-restricted feeding, and healthy aging.“ points out that circadian rhythms optimize physiology and health by temporally coordinating cellular function, tissue function and behavior. Dawn asks how this study found that optimizing the timing of external cues with defined eating patterns could sustain a person’s circadian clock and possibly prevent disease. [00:51:59] Satchin discusses his mouse study that was detailed in his recent paper in Cell Metabolism titled, “Time-Restricted Feeding Prevents Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome in Mice Lacking a Circadian Clock.” [00:54:59] Ken asks if the benefits of time-restricted feeding reproduced in different mouse strains and across genders, or if all studies been done on the same mouse strain/gender. [00:56:43] Dawn asks if the experimental models using mice, who are nocturnal animals, are presenting difficulties in terms of translating the effects of time-restricted feeding on humans. [00:58:39] Ken asks Satchin for his thoughts on the findings of Joseph Takahashi’s work. Ken wonders if Takahashi’s findings imply that some of the benefits of caloric restriction in mice may actually be due to time restriction. [01:00:19] In Satchin’s human studies, people who had 8- to 12-hour eating windows also had some health benefits and lost weight. Dawn asks what role a person’s diet played in weight loss. [01:03:03] Satchin discusses his thoughts on the translatability of research examining circadian rhythm and inflammatory mechanisms in mice. [01:06:30] Satchin and his lab at Salk Institute have developed an app called “My Circadian Clock,” which is part of a research project that’s using smartphones to track people’s daily behaviors. Dawn asks Satchin to give an overview of the project and discuss how people can participate in the research. [01:09:53] Satchin briefly talks about any potential efficacy in commercial sleep tracking devices. [01:12:08] Satchin talks about the findings of a National Institute of Aging paper that showed time-restricted eating might increase longevity. [01:14:40] Satchin talks about his work with Dr. Valter Longo, who was the guest on episode 64 of STEM-Talk. [01:16:45] While research on chronopharmacology is encouraging, Satchin discusses what some of the main logistical constraints we face in trying to apply its tenets in the clinic. [01:20:02] Satchin discusses how he convinced his mother to try time-restricted eating. [01:23:01] Commenting on how all of Satchin’s mother’s siblings have some sort of metabolic disease, either high cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension or a combination of the three, Dawn asks what is it about the Indian diet that is so unhealthy. [01:25:32] Satchin talks about what his diet and eating window look like on a typical day. [01:26:28] Regarding the symposium Satchin attended in Stockholm. Ken asks how he deals with travel and jet lag in terms of his circadian rhythm. [01:28:27] In terms of the future, Dawn ends the interview asking Satchin what new studies he is considering and what direction he thinks his research will take. Links Salk Institute Dr. Satchin Panda bio “The Circadian Code” My Circadian Clock app Circadian rhythms, time-restricted feeding, and healthy aging Time-Restricted Feeding Prevents Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome in Mice Lacking a Circadian Clock Dr. Valter Longo, who was the guest on episode 64 of STEM-Talk. Learn more about IHMC STEM-Talk homepage Ken Ford bio Dawn Kernagis bio
This podcast will change your daily routine   - Dr. Satchin Panda #179
Zestology: Live with energy, vitality and motivation
Dr. Satchin Panda is a bit of a ledge. He’s possibly the world’s most respected area in the field of Circadian rhythms and daily routines that optimise our health. We talk; How to stop peeing in the middle of the night! Bright light at night and eye masks. All the fun of time-restricted eating Supplements - is it okay to take them outside the feeding window. My fasting experiments (geeky I know) coffee, can we drink it as part of an intermittent fast (you might not like this bit…) saturated fat… in evening melatonin supplements what to go for. And an amazing book recommendation too.   This is one of my favourites. Satchin is a real expert in his field. Enjoy. And his new book is called The Circadian Code: Lose Weight, Supercharge Your Energy, and Transform Your Health from Morning to Midnight.
Light, Dark, & Your Sleep: Satchin Panda, Part 1 : 466
Bulletproof Radio
In this fascinating episode of Bulletproof Radio, Dave talks to leading researcher in Circadian Rhythms, Satchin Panda about why we are wired to follow a natural pattern of light and dark, and what we can do to get the rest we need in an electric society.Satchin goes into surprising research on how your sleep, or lack thereof, has a profound impact on a huge number of diseases. Such as: diabetes, depression, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, and cancer.Plus, is it possible that Dave Asprey is a sleep mutant?Enjoy the show!
Light, Dark, & Your Belly: Satchin Panda, Part 2 : 467
Bulletproof Radio
Maybe its not what you eat, but when! In this episode of Bulletproof Radio Dave continues the conversation with leading researcher in Circadian Rhythms, Satchin Panda about forgetting calories, forgetting about what kind of food it is, and only focusing on timing!Dave and Satchin go into some surprising results in mice and Satchin's own mother!Also, Dave Asprey talks about how he avoids jet lag by controlling light and food! 
Eating Affects Your Sleep (and vice versa) - Satchin Panda : 560
Bulletproof Radio
Satchin Panda, Ph.D., is a leading expert in the field of circadian rhythm research. As a professor at the Salk Institute in San Diego, California, his research focuses on circadian rhythm in health and disease.Research in his lab has shown the profound impact of ambient light and daily eating-fasting on the prevention and prognosis of a wide range of diseases including diabetes, depression, metabolic syndrome, heart diseases, and cancer.He also discovered time-restricted eating in which individuals who eat everything within an 8- to 12-hour period can boost circadian rhythm and prevent or reverse many chronic diseases.Dr. Panda published a new book titled: The Circadian Code: Lose Weight, Supercharge Your Energy, and Transform Your Health from Morning to Midnight.In this episode we talk about the impact of Dr. Panda’s research and discoveries on my Game Changers Law #19: Waking Up Early Does Not Make You a Good Person, his new book and why circadian rhythm is so closely linked to productivity and performance.
FMM-164 Two-Day Tuesday inspired by Dr Satchin Panda
Fasting Motivation Minute
STEM-Talk – Dr. Satchin Panda on Circadian Rhythms and Time-Restricted Eating to Improve Health https://podcastnotes.org/2019/01/02/panda-2/   The linked web page is to the key takeaways from Dr Stachin Panda’s talk on Circadian Rhythms and time restricted eating to improve health   Black coffee in the morning does not appear to signal the start of the eating window But you absolutely cannot put cream/sugar in it and still be in a fasted state Mouse studies show that time-restricted eating leads to weight loss (specifically coming from a loss of body fat) A sleep deprived brain tricks us into thinking we’re hungrier than we actually are in the first study, After 18 weeks, it was found that the mice who followed the 8 hour eating window, weighed 28% less on average After 12-16 hours without food, blood ketone levels begin to rise The mice that followed the time-restricted eating window in the above study, showed an increase in endurance in a 13 week study with obese mice, a 9 hour window eating window caused mice to lose a large amount of fat but not muscle Satchin is starting a study to see if time-restricted eating will help people with metabolic syndrome   there were additional studies on sleep deprivation and trying to sleep during the daytime.     Figure it out!  the fasting motivation podcast is not medical advice.   You’re awesome! You’re fantastic Get Motivated.  Get Fasted. https://fastingmotivation.com/     Subscribe on iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/fasting-motivation-minute/id1430488150?mt=2   Subscribe on Android https://subscribeonandroid.com/fastingmotivation.com/feed/dailyminute
Circadian Rhythms And Time - Restricted Eating With Dr. Satchin Panda
TheHealthHub
In this episode we speak with Dr. Satchin Panda a Professor at the Salk Institute about Circadian Rhythms and Timed-Eating. Dr. Panda's research focuses on circadian rhythm in health and disease. His discoveries are rated among the top ten breakthroughs of the year by the Science magazine, and he is considered as one of the top 50 influential scientists in the book “Brain Trust”. Research in his lab has shown the profound impact of ambient light and daily eating-fasting rhythm on the prevention and management of chronic diseases and cancer. mycircadianclock.org www.salk.edu
RFR 123: Time Restrictive Feeding and Circadian Rhythms with Dr Satchin Panda
The Real Food Reel
In Episode 123 of The Real Food Reel we are joined by Dr Satchin Panda to discuss time restricted feeding and the implications for muscle mass, breast cancer and cardiovascular disease risk. Show Notes: My Circadian Clock: https://mycircadianclock.org Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association: http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2017/01/30/CIR.0000000000000476 Prolonged Nightly Fasting and Breast Cancer Risk: Findings from NHANES (2009-2010): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25896523 Prolonged Nightly Fasting and Breast Cancer Prognosis: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaoncology/article-abstract/2506710 The post RFR 123: Time Restrictive Feeding and Circadian Rhythms with Dr Satchin Panda appeared first on The Wellness Couch.
Dr. Satchin Panda on Practical Implementation of Time-Restricted Eating & Shift Work Strategies
The Best of Diet and Fitness Podcasts for Women
This episode is a round 2 episode with none other than Dr. Satchin Panda of the Salk Institute! While discussion with Dr. Panda invariably leads to eating behaviors, his deep background in circadian biology always tends to lend new and insightful perspectives. There's a good reason for this! It's an area he has made deep contributions to, especially through the discovery of melanopsin, which is a photopigment found in the eye that, rather than forming images, is specialized for communicating information about time-of-day to the "master oscillator" of circadian rhythm, the suprachiasmatic nucleus.Dr. Rhonda Patrick is a Ph.D in biomedical science and expert on nutritional health. Her podcasts and other videos can be found at FoundMyFitness.com.Rhonda Recommended ProductsAbbott Precision Xtra Glucose Monitor23andmeNAD Precursor SupplementLife Extension PQQVitamin D3Vitamin KOn the first episode with Dr. Panda, we were introduced to a new paradigm for eating known as time-restricted eating. Time-restricted eating, on the surface, shares many characteristics with an idea many of you may be more familiar with known as intermittent fasting. The difference, however, is that Dr. Panda's concept of time-restricted feeding has some degree of focus on the effect of poorly timed consumption food (or even xenobiotics) can have on the subtle behavior of our tissues. At nearly two hours of dialog, this episode touches on a lot of material, but also has a special focus on practical implementation of time-restricted eating, featuring a few of the most frequent questions that came after the first conversation. To see a list of these questions, click the timeline tab above and look for timepoints with the heading "practical implementation." (SPOILER: Yes, we cover black coffee! )"10-14 hours of fasting when we get up in the morning means that we have given our gut rest." - Dr. Satchin PandaIn addition to these important and very practical how-to tidbits, we dive into lots of interesting new territory as well, including...How human anecdote and animal evidence suggests time-restricted feeding may be especially useful for gut-related issues, including inflammatory bowel disease and acid reflux.The fascinating way Dr. Panda is using human anecdote from his trial to ask new scientific questions he wouldn't think to ask and then going back to animal data to figure it out and how this unique approach forms a sort of closed loop pattern: animal → human feedback → back to animal for mechanism.How labs doing caloric restriction research may have actually been reaping the benefits of time-restricted without realizing it as an incidental to their experimental design.The revelation that 70% of FDA drugs are subject to circadian effects and are either less effective or more effective at certain times of the day.The effect melatonin has on the pancreatic production of insulin and the insight this lends to why we should probably stop eating at least 2-3 hours before we go to bed.The bizarre way circadian rhythms affects everything from susceptibility to UV damage to recovery from surgery to cancer risk (at least if you think the World Health Organization knows what they're talking about).