The Sources of Emily's Fun Facts

A curated episode list by Emily Boda
Creation Date December 14th, 2018
Updated Date Updated November 27th, 2019
 1 person likes this
Sometimes you hear a story or a fact on a podcast and for some reason that fact sticks with you for the rest of your life. There is no rhyme or reason why these specific facts have stuck with me, but this is a collection of these facts.
332- The Accidental Room
A group of artists find a secret room in a massive shopping center in Providence, RI and discover a new way to experience the mall. Plus, we look at the origin of the very first mall and the fascinating man who designed it, Victor Gruen. The Accidental Room Subscribe to Vanessa Lowe’s Nocturne DONATE NOW to Radiotopia!
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Emily Boda

Did you know that the last real shopping mall in the US was built in 2006? And the rise and fall of shopping malls is tied to Air Conditioning? The first story in this episode is interesting and entertaining in it's own right and then in the second half they rebroadcast a story from a few years ago about the history and future of shopping malls. The fun fact is right around minute 36.
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War of the Worlds
It's been 80 years to the day since Orson Welles' infamous radio drama "The War of the Worlds" echoed far and wide over the airwaves. So we want to bring you back to our very first live hour, where we take a deep dive into what was one of the most controversial moments in broadcasting history. "The War of the Worlds," a radio play about Martians invading New Jersey, caused panic when it originally aired, and it's continued to fool people since--from Santiago, Chile to Buffalo, New York to a particularly disastrous evening in Quito, Ecuador. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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Emily Boda

Did you know that the "War of the Worlds" scare probably wasn't as bad as we think it was BUT in 1949 it was recreated in Quinto, Ecuador and people died as a result?
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Alpha Gal
Tuck your napkin under your chin.  We’re about to serve up a tale of love, loss, and lamb chops.  For as long as she can remember, Amy Pearl has loved meat in all its glorious cuts and marbled flavors. And then one day, for seemingly no reason, her body wouldn’t tolerate it.  No steaks. No brisket. No weenies.  It made no sense to her or to her doctor: why couldn’t she eat something that she had routinely enjoyed for decades? Something our evolutionary forebears have eaten since time immemorial? The answer involves mysterious maps, interpretive dance, and a collision of three different species. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.
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Emily Boda

Did you know you can develop a meat allergy? As recently as ten years ago doctors thought this was impossible, but the allergy only seems to be becoming more common.
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A Three Year-Old Girl, a Colony of Dogs, and One Very Rare Side Effect
When Mathilda Crisp was three years-old, she got sick. She stopped sleeping through the night, but during the day, she would fall asleep without warning — during a swim lesson, for example, or straight into her cereal bowl at breakfast. For one doctor, figuring out what was making this little girl sick was just the beginning of an even bigger medical mystery.
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Emily Boda

Did you know that during the swine flu scare of 2009 a flu vaccine caused some children in Northern UK to get narcolepsy? The vaccine had not be approved for use anywhere else in the world, but was rushed through by the NIH.
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American Football
Today, we tackle football. It’s the most popular sport in the US, shining a sometimes harsh light on so much of what we have been, what we are, and what we hope to be. Savage, creative, brutal and balletic, whether you love it or loathe it … it’s a touchstone of the American identity. Along with conflicted parents and players and coaches who aren’t sure if the game will survive, we take a deep dive into the surprising history of how the game came to be. At the end of the 19th century, football is a nascent and nasty sport. The sons of the most powerful men in the country are literally knocking themselves out to win these gladiatorial battles. But then the Carlisle Indian School, formed in 1879 to assimilate the children and grandchildren of the Native American men who fought the final Plains Wars, fields the most American team of all. The kids at Carlisle took the field to face off against a new world that was destroying theirs, and along the way, they changed the fundamentals of football forever.  Correction: An earlier version of this episode included a few errors that we have corrected. We've also added one new piece of information.  The piece originally stated that British football had no referees.  While this was true in the earliest days of British football, they were eventually added. We stated that referees were added to American football in response to Pop Warner. American referees existed prior to Pop Warner, in order to address brutality as well as the kind of rule-bending that Pop Warner specialized in. Chuck Klosterman said that the three most popular sports in the US are football, college football and major league baseball. In fact, baseball actually ranks 2nd, college football is third. Monet Edwards stated that 33 members of her family were players in the NFL. That number is actually 13.  We also added one new fact: over 200 students at The Carlisle Indian School died of malnutrition, poor health or distress from homesickness.  The audio has been adjusted to reflect these corrections.
Songs that Cross Borders
Coming off our adventures with Square Dancing, and Jad's dive into the world of Dolly Parton, we look back at one our favorites. About a decade ago, we found out that American country music is surprising popular in places like Zimbabwe, Thailand, and South Africa. Aaron Fox, an anthropologist of music at Columbia University, tells us that quite simply, country music tells a story that a lot of us get. Then, intrepid international reporter Gregory Warner takes us along on one of his very first forays into another country, where he discovers an unexpected taste of home. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  Aaron Foxes book: Real Country: Music And Language In Working-Class Culture  Gregory Warner's podcast Rough Translation 
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Emily Boda

Did you know that American country music is incredibly popular in Thailand, Zimbabwe, and South Africa? It has to do with how perfectly country music captures the feeling of missing your old home. I've been telling people this fun fact since I first heard the episode 11 years ago, and this episode is great to revisit.
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371- Dead Cars
Everything in Bethel, Alaska comes in by cargo plane or barge, and even when something stops working, it’s often too expensive and too inconvenient to get it out again. So junk accumulates. Diane McEachern has been a resident of Bethel for about 20 years, and she’s made it her personal mission to count every single dead car in the city. Dead cars are the most visible manifestation of the town’s junk problem. You see them everywhere -- broken down, abandoned, left to rust and rot out in the elements. Dead Cars Plus, a preview of Radiotopia’s newest series Passenger List. Subscribe!
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Emily Boda

Did you know Bethel, Alaska has the most taxis per capita of any city in the world?
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