The rise of the hard right

A curated episode list by Imaguy1337
Creation Date June 14th, 2019
Updated Date Updated July 3rd, 2019
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Part 1: The Battle for Europe
The Daily
The decades-long plan to stitch together countries and cultures into the European Union was ultimately blamed for two crises: mass migration and crippling debt. Together, those events contributed to a wave of nationalism across Europe. In a five-part series this week, we take a look at some of the movements aiming to disrupt the E.U. from within. Guest: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Before the European Parliament elections last month, Katrin Bennhold and producers of “The Daily” set out on a 10-day trip to find out what Europe means to Europeans today.The results of the elections indicated that the struggle over the future direction of the European Union would only intensify.
Part 2: The French Rebellion
The Daily
President Emmanuel Macron of France had been viewed as the next leader of a liberal Europe. But when the Yellow Vest movement swept the country, protesters took to the streets, rejecting him as elitist and questioning the vision of Europe that he stood for. In Part 2 of our series, we traveled to a city in northern France to hear from some of these protesters. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” met with Yellow Vest demonstrators in Reims. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:For some followers of the Yellow Vest movement, Europe embodies everything they have come to hate: shuttered factories, stagnating wages and a young banker-turned-president in favor of deeper integration.In elections last month for the European Parliament, the far-right leader Marine Le Pen won in the rural, depressed and deindustrialized areas of northern, south-central and eastern France that gave rise to the Yellow Vest revolt.
Part 3: ‘Italy First’
The Daily
In Italy, hard-right populists have moved from the fringes to become part of the national government. Now, the country is on the front lines of a nationalist resurgence in Europe. To understand why, we spent a day with Susanna Ceccardi, a rising star of the far-right League party. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” hit the campaign trail with Ms. Ceccardi in Tuscany. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Ms. Ceccardi is among a group of nationalist politicians seeking to break the European Union from the inside.A victory for the anti-immigrant League party in the European Parliament elections gave Matteo Salvini, the party’s leader and Italy’s interior minister, the strongest claim to the leadership of Europe’s populists.
Part 4: Poland’s Culture Wars
The Daily
In Poland, a nationalist party has been in power for four years. We went to Warsaw, the capital, and Gdansk, the birthplace of a movement that brought down Communism, to see how this government has changed democratic institutions. Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” spoke with Jaroslaw Kurski, a newspaper editor; Magdalena Adamowicz, a politician and the widow of a liberal mayor who was murdered; and Danuta Bialooka-Kostenecka, an official with the governing Law and Justice party. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Poland’s nationalists aren’t seeking to take the country out of the European Union, but to take the European Union out of Poland.With national elections approaching, both the government and its opponents have sought to shape the country’s historical memory.Poland’s governing party has made opposition to gay rights a cornerstone of its campaigning, escalating fears that the divisive rhetoric could translate to violence.