Best Feminist History Podcast Episodes

A curated episode list by DemonsandDames
Creation Date November 2nd, 2019
Updated Date Updated March 2nd, 2020
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2019's Best Feminist History Podcasts
Keisha Zollar tell us about Marie Laveau, the Voodoo Queen of New Orleans! Spoiler alert! She doesn’t die at the end! Well, she does, of course, but this is the first witch in our series who enjoys a nice long happy life, and who is still revered to this day. Keisha Zollar is an actress-comedienne who is currently a Writing Supervisor on Busy Tonight. Previously, she was a staff writer on The Opposition with Jordan Klepper, and her comedy group Astronomy Club has a digital series with Comedy Central.
Greg Jenner and his guests discuss the important questions surrounding Queen Boudica including: Is she a feminist icon? How do you pronounce her name? And was she really ginger? Get ready to forget everything you thought you knew about Boudica and learn what it was really like when the Romans invaded. Featuring comedian, author and actress Sara Pascoe, known for QI, Have I Got News For You, and W1A among many other shows, and historian Dr Emma Southon, specialist in Roman history and co-host of the History is Sexy podcast. It’s history for people who don’t like history! This episode was produced by Dan Morelle and scripted and researched by Greg Jenner.
Agatha Christie once said that she wanted to be remembered as, “a good writer of detective and thriller stories.” We say she needs to be remembered for a whole lot more: daughter, wife, mother, pharmacist, playwright and adventurer only begin the list.
Many of us are familiar with the work of Lorraine Hansberry, including her pivotal and history-making Broadway play, "A Raisin in the Sun." However, she was an outspoken advocate for federal intervention in the school desegregation movement. 
Dame Jenni Murray has spent three decades as the host of BBC Radio Four's Woman's Hour programme. Her new book, 'A History Of The World In 21 Women' celebrates women who have had a profound impact on the shaping of our world, but it's not an exhaustive list! What unites her chosen twenty-one is that each has faced seemingly insurmountable obstacles to achieve their ambition, regardless of their colour or class. She has met and interviewed many of the women featured. Jenni's 21 are: Joan of Arc, Artemesia Gentileschi, Angela Merkel, Benazir Bhutto, Hillary Clinton, Coco Chanel, Empress Dowager Cixi, Catherine the Great, Clara Schumann, Hatshepsut, Wangari Maathai, Golda Meir, Frida Kahlo, Toni Morrison, Margaret Atwood, Isabella of Castile, Cathy Freeman, Anna Politokovskaya, Sirimavo Bandaranaike, Madonna and Marie Curie.
(Lucy) Käthchen Paulus was born in the late 1860s, in a German village where she supported her mother by working as a seamstress. She died in the mid-30s in relative obscurity. But in between, she ran away with an adventurer, made and lost a fortune, became an international celebrity, an entrepreneur, a WWI military advisor, and an inventor of lasting influence.
Podcast episode about the workers at the Lusty Lady strip club in San Francisco who in 1997 were the first women who managed to unionise a strip joint in the United States, and who later took it over and ran it as a workers’ co-operative.This podcast is funded by our listeners. You can support us and get exclusive early access to episodes, bonus audio and more at https://patreon.com/workingclasshistory We have more info, photos, videos and full show notes for this episode on our website at https://workingclasshistory.com/2019/03/13/e20-the-exotic-dancers-union/ We have been trying to improve our podcast over the last few months, but this is really the first of our new wave of episodes which we have been devoting huge amounts of time to. We have worked on this episode for over 6 months, and are very pleased to finally be able to release it. Ultimately we will only be able to continue to devote this much time to the podcast if we get more support on patreon, so please do support us if you can. If not, we would still appreciate you sharing podcast episodes on social media, and reviewing us on Apple Podcasts. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS As always, thanks to our patreon supporters for making this podcast possible. Thanks also to the following people: Vixen Noir, for the theme music – Lusty Lady. You can buy it here https://play.google.com/music/preview/Tpj2ewbwpvzrlqb45umxztaav6m?play=1&u=0 Episode cover photo by Matthew Roth https://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewalmonroth Editing by Louise Barry of Audio Interference https://interferencearchive.org/category/publications/audio/ To commemorate and celebrate radical sex workers like at the Lusty Lady, and to help fund our work, we have produced a range of Sex Workers Power merch, using an illustration from @ripbambi, available here: https://shop.workingclasshistory.com/collections/all/sex-workersAgain, full show notes including photos and videos here: https://workingclasshistory.com/2019/03/13/e20-the-exotic-dancers-union/
Military history rarely focuses on the women who lived through conflict and worked on recovery efforts. This episode covers women who assisted troops, buried the dead, nursed the wounded, and managed to survive the fighting in Gettysburg Pennsylvania.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Ashley & Sarah journey back to early nineteenth-century New Orleans to explore the life and crimes of serial killer Delphine LaLaurie. From her very early marriage to the infamous 1833 fire that destroyed her mansion and reputation to her exile and death in Paris. We go beyond the gratuitous Southern gothic stylings to ask what does it take to make a monster? Is it, perhaps, a monstrous time?Ash also does a swamp impression.BIBLIOGRAPHY:Long, C. (2012). Madame Lalaurie : Mistress of the haunted house. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.“Madame Lalaurie of New Orleans” by Fred R. Darkis, Jr. Louisiana History: The Journal of the Louisiana Historical Association Vol. 23, No. 4 (Autumn, 1982), pp. 383-399

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