Favourite episodes

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Creation Date July 21st, 2019
Updated Date Updated May 7th, 2020
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  1. Jordan Erica Webber talks to psychologist Pete Etchells about his new book, which explores both his personal relationship with video games and how society views – and could learn to view – this form of entertainment.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/chipspod
  2. Gene-editing technologies have the power to change life as we know it. This week on the podcast, we’re bringing you the first episode from our Common Threads series, part of an innovative new Guardian project called The Gene Gap. We’ll be talking about science but without the scientists – instead we’ll hear from the people who could be most affected by the promise of gene editing. This first episode explores identity. What makes us human? And what does it mean to be different in a world that strives for perfection? To listen to episodes two and three, search ‘The Gene Gap: Common Threads’ wherever you get your podcasts. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
  3. The story of how “Who Let The Dogs Out” ended up stuck in all of our brains goes back decades and spans continents. It tells us something about inspiration, and how creativity spreads, and about whether an idea can ever really belong to just one person. About ten years ago, Ben Sisto was reading the Wikipedia entry for the song when he noticed something strange. A hairdresser in England named “Keith” was credited with giving the song to the Baha Men, but Keith had no last name and the fact had no citation. This mystery sent Ben down a rabbit hole to uncover the true story. Whomst Among Us Has Let The Dogs Out
  4. In July 2019 Nicolas Pelham, The Economist's Middle East correspondent, received a rare journalist’s visa to visit Iran. But on the day he was due to fly home he was detained by intelligence officials from the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, one of the country’s most powerful institutions. He was questioned repeatedly and forced to stay in the country for seven more weeks. Although unable to leave, he was later allowed to roam the city without a minder and found a paradoxical liberation in captivity. He gained a rare insight into life in Tehran, recording the sounds of the city as he explored. In this podcast, he tells Anne McElvoy his extraordinary story.Nicolas Pelham’s account, “Trapped in Iran”, is on the cover of 1843 magazine. Subscribe at www.economist.com/1843offer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  5. It's the slow feeling of becoming less. Jerry Roback was assigned by the State Department to humanitarian projects in Vietnam during the war. He lives in Washington state.  Join the "10 Things That Scare Me" conversation, and tell us your fears at 10thingspodcast.org.
  6. The problem is, most of what I've ever done in my life is motivated by fear. It's like a big dust storm of fear. Brooke Gladstone is a Peabody-award winning host of WNYC's On The Media. She's also the author of The Influencing Machine, a media manifesto in graphic form. If you'd like to hear more about Brooke's inner life, check out the Radiolab episode about nihilism  https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/dust-planet  and the follow up to it on On The Media https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/staring-abyss Join the "10 Things That Scare Me" conversation, and tell us your fears at 10thingspodcast.org
  7. You know what I discovered that happens a lot more in New York City than you'd imagine? Scaffolding falling on people. Jon Ronson is a writer, journalist and radio host. He still uses Twitter @jonronson. And for more on Alison Moyet's Elvis Costello story, you should listen to her interview on Desert Island Discs. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b043wk0j Join the "10 Things That Scare Me" conversation, and tell us your fears at 10thingspodcast.org.
  8. Men are often the default subjects of design, which can have a huge impact on big and critical aspects of everyday life. Caroline Criado Perez is the author of Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men, a book about how data from women is ignored and how this bakes in bias and discrimination in the things we design. Invisible Women
  9. On the podcast: An American adventurer describes climbing over bodies to reach the top of Mount Everest.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  10. On the podcast: Yousef Bashir describes growing up in Gaza during the second Palestinian uprising. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  11. A democracy activist describes how the demonstrations got underway and where they go from here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  12. For our season finale, a listener's story: When a six-year-old boy adopts Tokyo as his new home, his American mom has to figure out where she belongs in her son's new life.If you want to share your story, email roughtranslation@npr.org
  13. If you're the kind of person who thinks you can't be conned, that assumption may make it harder for you to recognize when you actually are being scammed. We speak with professional poker player and author Maria Konnikova about how con-artists get inside the stories we all tell ourselves, about ourselves. Then we go to an international multimillion dollar scam in Costa Rica, where a master of the con meets his match... the IT guy.
  14. This past fall, two hundred people gathered at The Explorer’s Club in New York City. The building was once a clubhouse for famed naturalists and explorers. Now it’s an archive of ephemera and rarities from pioneering expeditions around the globe. But this latest gathering was held to celebrate the first biological census of its kind –an effort to count all of the squirrels in New York City’s Central Park. Squirrels were purposefully introduced into our cities in the 1800s, and when their population exploded, we lost track of how many there are. Uptown Squirrel
  15. Akbar Ahmed is an academic, poet, former diplomat, and all-around renaissance man. In Tell Them, I Am’s final story of the season, Ahmed recounts how a single train ride when he was 4 years old changed his life’s direction forever.Hosted by Misha Euceph.Written by Misha Euceph. Edited by Arwen Nicks. Produced by Misha Euceph and Mary Knauf.Sound designed by Misha Euceph and Arwen Nicks.Music by David Linard.Engineering by Shawn Corey Campbell and Valentino Rivera.Illustration by Emmen Ahmed.Graphic Design by Stephanie Kraft.Want a Tell Them, I Am t-shirt? We got you. 
  16. G. Willow Wilson is a novelist and comic book writer, known for her run on the Ms. Marvel series. When 9/11 happened, the world seemed chaotic to say the least — but Willow found that sometimes all you need is a little Neil Gaiman to put you back on track. Hosted by Misha Euceph.Written by James Kim, Arwen Nicks and Misha Euceph.Edited by Arwen Nicks. Produced by Misha Euceph and Mary Knauf.Sound designed by James Kim. Music by David Linard.Engineering by Shawn Corey Campbell and Valentino Rivera.Illustration by Emmen Ahmed.Graphic Design by Stephanie Kraft.Want a Tell Them, I Am t-shirt? We got you. 
  17. Salman Agah is a legendary skateboarder and owner of Pizzanista, a popular L.A. pizza joint. But back when he was a teen in San Jose, he had no reference for what his future might look like or where his ambitions were taking him. Hosted by Misha Euceph.Written by Mary Knauf, Arwen Nicks and Misha Euceph.Edited by Arwen Nicks. Produced by Misha Euceph and Mary Knauf.Sound designed by Mary Knauf. Music by David Linard.Engineering by Shawn Corey Campbell and Valentino Rivera.Illustration by Emmen Ahmed.Graphic Design by Stephanie Kraft.Want a Tell Them, I Am t-shirt? We got you. 
  18. Reza Aslan is the author of No God But God and Zealot, as well as a known TV personality. His political education and distrust of authority began with a game of chess when he was just 7 years old. Hosted by Misha Euceph.Written by Arwen Nicks and Misha Euceph.Edited by Arwen Nicks. Produced by Misha Euceph and Mary Knauf.Sound designed by Arwen Nicks.Music by David Linard.Engineering by Shawn Corey Campbell and Valentino Rivera.Illustration by Emmen Ahmed.Graphic Design by Stephanie Kraft.Want a Tell Them, I Am t-shirt? We got you. 
  19. Ramy Youssef has his own show on Hulu, but it wouldn’t have happened if it hadn’t been for one single moment brushing his teeth when he was 19 — and half his face went totally numb. Hosted by Misha Euceph.Written by Misha Euceph and Mary Knauf.Edited by Arwen Nicks. Produced by Misha Euceph and Mary Knauf.Sound designed by Misha Euceph and Mary Knauf. Music by David Linard.Engineering by Shawn Corey Campbell and Valentino Rivera.Illustration by Emmen Ahmed.Graphic Design by Stephanie Kraft.Want a Tell Them, I Am t-shirt? We got you. 
  20. This is not another depressing AF story about the rape kit backlog. Instead, unladylike hero and sexual assault nurse examiner Trisha Sheridan tells Cristen and Caroline everything we didn't know we needed to know about what's in a rape kit and how could these forensic tools restore consent, dignity and justice to patients. Plus, we discover the very surprising funding source for America's first rape kits! TW for rape and sexual assault. Hear exclusive bonus episodes of Unladylike on Stitcher Premium! Use promo code "UNLADYLIKE" at stitcher.com/premium for a free month trial.Unladylike: A Field Guide to Smashing the Patriarchy and Claiming Your Space is available now, wherever books and audiobooks are sold. Follow Unladylike on social @unladylikemedia. Subscribe to our newsletter at unladylike.co/newsletter. This episode is brought to you by the new podcast UnErased, Bumble BFF [bumble.com/unladylike], Living Proof [livingproof.com/unladylike with code UNLADYLIKE], Fossil [fossil.com/unladylike] and Ulta Beauty [ultabeauty.com].
  21. Before we turned our phones to silent or vibrate, there was a time when everyone had ringtones -- when the song your phone played really said something about you. These simple, 15 second melodies were disposable, yet highly personal trinkets. They started with monophonic bleeps and bloops and eventually became actual clips of real songs. And it was all thanks to a man named Vesku-Matti Paananen. All Rings Considered
  22. In the United Kingdom, the freedom to walk through private land is known as “the right to roam.” The movement to win this right was started in the 1930s by a rebellious group of young people who called themselves “ramblers” and spent their days working in the factories of Manchester, England. Plus, bothy talk. Right to Roam
  23. On the podcast: A former State Department official who led the outreach to the Muslim world after the attacks of 9/11. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  24. This week we loan out Mary to International Rescue Committee’s podcast, Displaced, for a chat with Ravi Gurumurthy & Grant Gordon. If you came for Maeve but don’t know about Mary, this week’s specialsode is a chance to hear the story of her venture into climate justice from the very beginning. Mary & Ravi discuss how people all over the world are being forced into displacement by climate change. We hear who her heroes are, and why none of us should stop believing that we can still do something about climate change.
  25. Everything in Bethel, Alaska comes in by cargo plane or barge, and even when something stops working, it’s often too expensive and too inconvenient to get it out again. So junk accumulates. Diane McEachern has been a resident of Bethel for about 20 years, and she’s made it her personal mission to count every single dead car in the city. Dead cars are the most visible manifestation of the town’s junk problem. You see them everywhere -- broken down, abandoned, left to rust and rot out in the elements. Dead Cars Plus, a preview of Radiotopia’s newest series Passenger List. Subscribe!
  26. In an online world, that story about you lives forever. The tipsy photograph of you at the college football game? It’s up there. That news article about the political rally you were marching at? It’s up there. A DUI? That’s there, too. But what if ... it wasn’t. In Cleveland, Ohio, a group of journalists are trying out an experiment that has the potential to turn things upside down: they are unpublishing content they’ve already published. Photographs, names, entire articles. Every month or so, they get together to decide what content stays, and what content goes. On today’s episode, reporter Molly Webster goes inside the room where the decisions are being made, listening case-by-case as editors decide who, or what, gets to be deleted. It’s a story about time and memory; mistakes and second chances; and society as we know it. This episode was reported by Molly Webster, and produced by Molly Webster and Bethel Habte.  Special thanks to Kathy English, David Erdos, Ed Haber, Brewster Kahle, Imani Leonard, Ruth Samuel, James Bennett II, Alice Wilder, Alex Overington, Jane Kamensky and all the people who helped shape this story. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  To learn more about Cleveland.com’s “right to be forgotten experiment,” check out the very first column Molly read about the project.
  27. The fashion industry constitutes 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions today, and is reported to be the fifth-largest polluting sector in the world. But with a growing ambition to both revisit ancient practices and develop futuristic technologies, can fast fashion quickly adapt and reverse its reputation into one of positive change? Eco-fashion designer, Thao Vu of Kilomet109 guest hosts this week’s episode from Hanoi, Vietnam, as she, Mary and Maeve discuss what it would take for big business to scale up sustainability principles for good.
  28. There are many walls in Belfast which physically separate Protestant neighborhoods from Catholic ones. Some are fences that you can see through, while others are made of bricks and steel. Many have clearly been reinforced over time: a cinderblock wall topped with corrugated iron, then topped with razor wire, stretching up towards the sky. Many of the walls in Northern Ireland went up in the 1970s and ‘80s at the height of what’s become known as “The Troubles.” Decades later, almost all of the walls remain standing. They cut across communities like monuments to the conflict, etched into the physical landscape. Taking them down isn’t going to be easy. Peace Lines
  29. The Indian government has revoked autonomy for the Muslim-majority region of Kashmir. This week, a close look at how Hindu nationalists are rewriting Indian history in the world's largest democracy. Plus: what are the stories that America has told about itself?  1. Producer Asthaa Chaturvedi [@Pasthaaa] examines the ways Hindu nationalists have sought to rewrite history in and outside the classroom in an effort to glorify India's Hindu past, and what this movement means for a country founded on principles of multiculturalism. Listen.  2. What are the stories that America has told about itself? Historian Greg Grandin [@GregGrandin] talks about his book, The End of the Myth: From the Frontier to the Border Wall in the Mind of America, and the old idea about limitless growth that influenced American policy and psychology. Listen. 
  30. What happens when you live out self-help advice? Cristen and Caroline find out from By the Book co-hosts Kristen Meinzer and Jolenta Greenberg. The pair has done exactly that with more than 50 self-improvement books, including The Secret, Girl Wash Your Face and The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. It’s all to find out: What is self-help really selling us, and why are women are so drawn to it?Unladylike: A Field Guide to Smashing the Patriarchy and Claiming Your Space is available now, wherever books and audiobooks are sold. Signed copies are available at podswag.com/unladylike.Follow Unladylike on social @unladylikemedia. Subscribe to our newsletter at unladylike.co/newsletter. And join our Facebook group!Our Pep Talk series is available only on Stitcher Premium. Sign up today to hear episodes on embracing swimsuit season, getting ready for a wedding, breaking out of the gender binary and more! Get a month of free listening at stitcher.com/premium with code UNLADYLIKE.This episode is brought to you by Bud Light Chelada [budlight.com], Thirdlove [thirdlove.com/UNLADYLIKE], and Honeybook [HoneyBook.com with code UNLADYLIKE] and the podcast Uncharted: Seattle.
  31. When confronted with trash piling up on a median in front of their home in Oakland, Dan and Lu Stevenson decided to try something unusual: they would install a statue of the Buddha to watch over the place. When asked by Criminal’s Phoebe Judge why they chose this particular religious figure, Dan explained simply: “He’s neutral.” He’s Still Neutral Subscribe to Criminal on Apple Podcasts or RadioPublic
  32. What happens when we wear makeup like war paint? Best-selling author R.O. Kwon confronts 'China doll' stereotypes with eyeshadow. Then, activist Jacob Tobia flips off the gender binary with a bold lip and five o'clock shadow.Unladylike: A Field Guide to Smashing the Patriarchy and Claiming Your Space is available now, wherever books and audiobooks are sold. Signed copies are available at podswag.com/unladylike.Follow Unladylike on social @unladylikemedia. Subscribe to our newsletter at unladylike.co/newsletter. And join our Facebook group!Our Pep Talk series is available only on Stitcher Premium. Sign up today to hear episodes on embracing swimsuit season, getting ready for a wedding, breaking out of the gender binary and more! Get a month of free listening at stitcher.com/premium with code UNLADYLIKE.This episode is brought to you by Bud Light Chelada [budlight.com], Flamingo [shopflamingo.com/unladylike], ZipRecruiter [http://ziprecruiter.com/unladylike], the podcasts Uncharted: Seattle, Stuff Mom Never Told You, and the Stitcher Premium podcast Mo Mophilia.
  33. How to walk away from things that are no longer a good use of time Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
  34. This week Jordan Erica Webber and Graihagh Jackson team up to examine the environmental price tag of the fast fashion phenomenon and explore how technology could hold the key to a more sustainable system. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/chipspod
  35. Jordan Erica Webber teams up with Nicola Davis to look at the gender data gap in both big tech and science, and the dangerous repercussions for women in a world built for men. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/chipspod
  36. Trump has said the taking the fifth makes "you look guilty as hell" but lot of Trump's associates are now taking the fifth in the Russia investigation. How should we interpret people taking the fifth?
  37. Democracy is on the ropes.  In the United States and abroad, citizens of democracies are feeling increasingly alienated, disaffected, and powerless.  Some are even asking themselves a question that feels almost too dangerous to say out loud: is democracy fundamentally broken?   Today on Radiolab, just a day before the American midterm elections, we ask a different question: how do we fix it?  We scrutinize one proposed tweak to the way we vote that could make politics in this country more representative, more moderate, and most shocking of all, more civil.  Could this one surprisingly do-able mathematical fix really turn political campaigning from a rude bloodsport to a campfire singalong? And even if we could do that, would we want to? This episode was reported by Latif Nasser, Simon Adler, Sarah Qari, Suzie Lechtenberg and Tracie Hunte, and was produced by Simon Adler, Matt Kielty, Sarah Qari, and Suzie Lechtenberg. Special thanks to Rob Richie (and everyone else at Fairvote), Don Saari, Diana Leygerman, Caroline Tolbert, Bobby Agee, Edward Still, Jim Blacksher, Allen Caton, Nikolas Bowie, John Hale, and Anna Luhrmann and the rest of the team at the Varieties of Democracy Institute in Sweden. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  oh...and GO VOTE!
  38. What if you’re a mother who’s a leader in the Christian community and your kid comes out as gay? Who do you call? The Mama Bears. This is the story of one woman who created a supergroup of like-minded mothers who faced down threats of excommunication because they refused to disown their kids, and will step in if you disown yours.This episode is sponsored by Audible (www.audible.com/unerased or text unerased to 500500), Away (www.awaytravel.com/UNERASED code: UNERASED), Simple Contacts (www.simplecontacts.com/unerased code: UNERASED), and Hello Fresh (www.hellofresh.com/UNERASED60 code: UNERASED60).
  39. Hanna presents an episode from one of our favorite NPR podcasts, Rough Translation, which tells the story of two people on a mission to help Evangelicals and environmentalists find common ground.
  40. Sand is so tiny and ubiquitous that it's easy to take for granted. But in his book The World in a Grain, author Vince Beiser traces the history of sand, exploring how it fundamentally shaped the world as we know it. "Sand is actually the most important solid substance on Earth," he argues. "It's the literal foundation of modern civilization." Plus, Roman talks with Kate Simonen of the Carbon Leadership Forum at the University of Washington about measuring the embodied carbon in building materials. Built on Sand
  41. Cities might be picking up your recyclables, but there is a very good chance they aren't being recycled. And that might be a good thing...if you really care about the planet. Part two of a two-part series. ⎸Subscribe to our newsletter here.
  42. Get more done and get out on time with these tips for smarter meetings. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
  43. Sound can have serious impacts on our health and wellbeing. And there’s no better place to think about health than hospitals. According to Joel Beckerman, sound designer and composer at Man Made Music: "Hospitals are horrible places to get better." Hospitals can be bad for your health because hospitals sound terrible. But sound designers and health care workers are looking to change that. This is part two in a two-part series supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation about how sound can be designed to reduce harm and even improve wellbeing. Sound and Health: Hospitals Learn more about Sonic Humanism
  44. This is the first of a four-part Sound Africa series exploring the tangled web of South Africa’s nuclear past, present and future. Reporter Rasmus Bitsch begins this story at an art gallery in Johannesburg’s stylish suburb of Maboneng, where artist Vincent Bezuidenhout is shining a spotlight on South Africa’s secret nuclear history through his exhibition Fail Deadly. From there, we connect the dots between the struggle against apartheid, the Cold War, and South Africa’s development of nuclear weapons. How important was the nuclear programme in the close-knit defensive position, or laager, adopted by the Afrikaner nationalist government? And did the bomb contribute to the state’s siege mentality? What history shows is that the nuclear programme fostered secrecy and paranoia, and it arguably still casts a shadow over South African politics today. *We regret an error in an earlier version of this episode in which we incorrectly state that Che Guevara led troops into the war in Angola.* -- Find out more about Sound Africa at our website: http://soundafrica.org/ Like Sound Africa on Facebook: www.facebook.com/soundafricapodcast Follow Sound Africa on Twitter: twitter.com/sound_africa and Instagram: www.instagram.com/sound_africa/ -- Sound Africa is an independent podcast collective based in South Africa. We focus on creative non-fiction from the African continent and are always looking for talented journalists and storytellers to collaborate with. If you are one of them or want to get in touch, send us an email: info@soundafrica.org.
  45. Africa is hardly thought of as a continent much involved in space exploration. But for the lift off of the Sound Africa Podcast we bring you two stories about Africa and space: First, The Afronaut: An introduction to a largely forgotten space program in Zambia in the 1960s. Did the leader of this wildly ambitious project, Edward Nkoloso, have a plan or was he just the delusional eccentric he was later made out to be? Second, The Telescope: A small town in the Karoo Desert of Northern South Africa has finally found its place in the world with the establishment of one of the biggest international science projects of our time. As the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) begins to take shape, we look at the telescope network that will likely transform the way we understand the universe and our place in it. -- Find out more about Sound Africa at our website: soundafrica.org. Like Sound Africa on Facebook: www.facebook.com/soundafricapodcast. Follow Sound Africa on Twitter: twitter.com/sound_africa and Instagram: www.instagram.com/sound_africa/. -- Sound Africa is an independent podcast collective based in South Africa. We focus on creative non-fiction from the African continent and are always looking for talented journalists and storytellers to collaborate with. If you are one of them or want to get in touch, send us an email: info@soundafrica.org.
  46. You’ve probably never heard of David Fairchild. But if you’ve savored kale, mango, peaches, dates, grapes, a Meyer lemon, or a glass of craft beer lately, you’ve tasted the fruits of his globe-trotting travels in search of the world’s best crops—and his struggles to get them back home to the United States. This episode, we talk to Daniel Stone, author of The Food Explorer, a new book all about Fairchild’s adventures. Listen in now for tales of pirates and biopiracy, eccentric patrons and painful betrayals, as well as the successes and failures that shaped not only the way we eat, but America’s place in the world. When David Fairchild was growing up in Kansas, in the 1880s, the U.S. was a very different place. The average North American diet was relatively bland—most of the astonishing variety of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and grains that we expect to find in our grocery stores today was simply not available, even seasonally, let alone year round. Americans ate plenty of meat, dairy, corn, and potatoes, but almost none of the crops we now take for granted, such as cashews, avocados, and broccoli. In part due to this lack of crop diversity, the U.S. was in the midst of an agricultural depression. At the same time, the country was trying to put itself back together after the Civil War; it was nothing like the global superpower it’s seen as today. There were also major changes afoot: although this period was known as the “Golden Age” of travel, as Stone told Gastropod, this was “not because it was easy, but because it was new.” For the first time, overseas travel for leisure was becoming an option for those with both a fortune and the necessary months available to spend on a steamship. For Fairchild, all of these things were related: he imagined that global travel would allow him to discover fabulous new crops and bring them home, to help America’s farmers and make America stronger. But how would a middle-class boy from rural America ever find a way to explore the little-known wilds of the Malay Archipelago or mainland China? And what would he find if he did? This episode, Daniel Stone takes us along on Fairchild’s incredible adventures, and helps us understand why Fairchild’s mission mattered—and why it eventually had to come to an end. Episode Notes The Food Explorer: The Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats, by Daniel Stone Although we spent an entire episode telling Fairchild’s story, we barely covered the half of the fantastic crops, characters, and adventures in Daniel Stone’s new book. It’s a fascinating and fun read, and we recommend it! Transcript For a transcript of the show, please click here. Please note that the transcript is provided as a courtesy and may contain errors The post Meet the Man Who Found, Finagled, and Ferried Home the Foods We Eat Today appeared first on Gastropod.
  47. Astronauts at the International Space Station can make one request to talk to an earthling of their choice. For some reason, Astronaut Mark Vande Hei chose us. A couple weeks ago, we were able to video chat with Mark and peer over his shoulder through the Cupola, an observatory room in the ISS. Traveling at 17,000 miles an hour, we zoomed from the Rockies to the East Coast in minutes. And from where Mark sits, the total darkness of space isn’t very far away.  Talking to Mark brought us back to 2012, when we spoke to another astronaut, Dave Wolf. When we were putting together our live show In the Dark, Jad and Robert called up Dave Wolf to ask him if he had any stories about darkness. And boy, did he. Dave told us two stories that  became the finale of our show. Back in late 1997, Dave Wolf was on his first spacewalk, to perform work on the Mir. Dave wasn't alone -- with him was veteran Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Solovyev.  Out in blackness of space, the contrast between light and dark is almost unimaginably extreme -- every 45 minutes, you plunge between absolute darkness on the night-side of Earth, and blazing light as the sun screams into view. Dave and Anatoly were tethered to the spacecraft, traveling 5 miles per second. That's 16 times faster than we travel on Earth's surface as it rotates -- so as they orbited, they experienced 16 nights and 16 days for every Earth day. Dave's description of his first spacewalk was all we could've asked for, and more. But what happened next ... well, it's just one of those stories that you always hope an astronaut will tell. Dave and Anatoly were ready to call it a job and head back into the Mir when something went wrong with the airlock. They couldn't get it to re-pressurize. In other words, they were locked out. After hours of trying to fix the airlock, they were running out of the resources that kept them alive in their space suits and facing a grisly death. So, they unhooked their tethers, and tried one last desperate move. In the end, they made it through, and Dave went on to perform dozens more spacewalks in the years to come, but he never again experienced anything like those harrowing minutes trying to improvise his way back into the Mir. After that terrifying tale, Dave told us about another moment he and Anatoly shared, floating high above Earth, staring out into the universe ... a moment so beautiful, and peaceful, we decided to use the audience recreate it, as best we could, for the final act of our live show. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty and Soren Wheeler.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.
  48. Want More? Read why some scientists think the future of spaceflight should be female. Also Explore: Meet the people who got us to space and the pioneers pushing us farther. Explore the never-used Soviet space shuttles rusting in a hangar in Kazakhstan. See Nat Geo editors' favorite space photos. Got something to say? Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard
  49. This week, we're throwing it back to an old favorite: a story about obsession, creativity, and a strange symmetry between a biologist and a composer that revolves around one famously repetitive piece of music. Anne Adams was a brilliant biologist. But when her son Alex was in a bad car accident, she decided to stay home to help him recover. And then, rather suddenly, she decided to quit science altogether and become a full-time artist. After that, her husband Robert Adams tells us, she just painted and painted and painted. First houses and buildings, then a series of paintings involving strawberries, and then ... "Bolero." At some point, Anne became obsessed with Maurice Ravel's famous composition and decided to put an elaborate visual rendition of the song to canvas. She called it "Unraveling Bolero." But at the time, she had no idea that both she and Ravel would themselves unravel shortly after their experiences with this odd piece of music. Arbie Orenstein tells us what happened to Ravel after he wrote "Bolero," and neurologist Bruce Miller helps us understand how, for both Anne and Ravel, "Bolero" might have been the first symptom of a deadly disease.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. Read more: Unravelling Bolero: progressive aphasia, transmodal creativity and the right posterior neocortex Arbie Orenstein's Ravel: Man and Musician
  50. Migrants in detention centers, another assault allegation against the President, and the start to a potentially devastating hurricane season… On this week’s On the Media, how painful news might be making America numb. And, why sometimes it’s okay to tune out. Plus, what Jeffrey Epstein's arrest teaches us about the Q-Anon conspiracy theory.  1. Max Read [@max_read],writer and editor at New York Magazine, on the partial fulfillment of a "message-board prophecy." Listen. 2. David Corn [@DavidCornDC], Washington bureau chief for Mother Jones, and Priya Shukla [@priyology], PhD candidate at the University of California-Davis, on the psychological effects of climate change on those who study it. Listen. 3. Dan Degerman [@ddegerman], philosophy researcher at Lancaster University, on the political implications of "Brexit anxiety." Listen. 4. Jenny Odell [@the_jennitaur], author of How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy, on how to protect our attention in the face of information overload. Listen.
  51. Nurturing new talent can be a great use of time Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
  52. The Arctic and it’s melting glaciers are the first images to mind when we think about climate change. But what do we know about the millions of indigenous peoples, who are fighting back against not only shifts in climate, but invasions for mineral extraction, shipping and fishing in their territories?  Dalee Sambo Dorough, chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, guest hosts this week episode with Mary & Maeve, from Anchorage, Alaska.
  53. April is National Poetry Month, so on this episode, we're passing the mic to a handful of talented poets — the people who narrate our lives and help us better understand our own experiences.
  54. Build a thriving network with this one habit that takes less than 10 minutes a day. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
  55. Joe Frank -- the radio producer’s radio producer, the ultimate acquired taste -- passed away a year ago this month. He was 79. For over four decades Frank hosted late-night shows that could float between hilarious dreams and suspenseful nightmares, between fact and fiction. And though his shows were rarely mainstream hits, cultural figures like Ira Glass of This American Life and film director Alexander Payne consider Frank a major influence on their own work. Brooke discussed Joe Frank's life, style and legacy with Jad Abumrad, co-host of WNYC's Radiolab, and Mark Oppenheimer, host of Tablet magazine's Unorthodox podcast, who wrote an article in Slate titled "Joe Frank Signs Off."
  56. Merry Christmas, to those who celebrate! To those who don't (and, aw heck, to those who do too) we offer a very special end-of-year gift: fear. More specifically, Brooke's greatest fears, courtesy of our WNYC colleagues, 10 Things That Scare Me. Fear is a subject — and experience — near and dear to our beloved Brooke, so we can assure you that this is not a conversation to skip. 
  57. Back in the summer of 2016, as Turkish putschists shut down highways, attacked government buildings and took broadcasters hostage, world media outlets struggled to provide sober reports of the coup. During the chaos, some listeners told us on Twitter that they’d appreciate an On the Media Breaking News Consumers Handbook coup edition. Coups are especially tricky to report on because they're mainly about perception and narrative. Plotters and the government are both trying to establish dominance, and misreporting can determine whether the attempt succeeds or not.  Naunihal Singh, author of Seizing Power: The Strategic Logic of Military Coups, says the first step for a successful military coup is to take control of radio and tv broadcasters. From there, they can literally and figuratively control the narrative.  Brooke spoke to Singh about how to understand coups through the media, and how to understand whether an attempt will succeed or fail. 
  58. A lot of us understand biological sex with a pretty fateful underpinning: if you’re born with XX chromosomes, you’re female; if you’re born with XY chromosomes, you’re male. But it turns out, our relationship to the opposite sex is more complicated than we think. And if you caught this show on-air, and would like to listen to the full version of our Sex Ed Live Show, you can check it out here.  This episode was reported by Molly Webster, and produced by Matt Kielty. With scoring, original composition and mixing by Matt Kielty and Alex Overington. Additional production by Rachael Cusick, and editing by Pat Walters. The “Ballad of Daniel Webster” and “Gonads” was written, performed and produced by Majel Connery and Alex Overington. Special thanks to Erica Todd, Andrew Sinclair, Robin Lovell-Badge, and Sarah S. Richardson. Plus, a big thank you to the musicians who gave us permission to use their work in this episode—composer Erik Friedlander, for "Frail as a Breeze, Part II," and musician Sam Prekop, whose work "A Geometric," from his album The Republic, is out on Thrill Jockey. Radiolab is supported in part by Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science. And the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, enhancing public understanding of science and technology in the modern world. More information about Sloan at www.sloan.org.