The Identity Trade: Privacy in the Age of Big Data

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Creation Date March 15th, 2020
Updated Date Updated May 7th, 2020
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  1. Although we assume a natural right to privacy, we readily give it away on our mobile phones and on social media websites. So as technology alters the very definition of what privacy is and the science of surveillance becomes ever more acute, is the idea of privacy little more than a quaint last-century notion? Mike Williams traces its history, and ponders what a society without privacy might look like. (Image: Girls peer through a crack in the door. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)
  2. Is privacy a guaranteed American right? Or is it just continually under threat? On this episode, Joanne, Ed and Nathan explore the places where the private and the public collide. We’ll look at voting in the 19th century, surveillance of gay employees in the federal government, the newsworthiness of your private life, and find out if there was ever a golden age of privacy in America. Image credit: The Right to Privacy by Unarmed Civilian via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  3. Privacy policies: most apps and websites have them, buried away somewhere. These legal documents explain how the company collects, uses, and shares your personal data. But let's be honest, few of us actually read these things, right? And that passive acceptance says a lot about our complicated relationship with online privacy. In the Season 5 premiere of IRL, host Manoush Zomorodi speaks with Charlie Warzel, writer-at-large with the New York Times, about our complicated relationship with data and privacy — and the role privacy policies play in keeping things, well, confusing. You'll also hear from Parker and Lila, two young girls who realize how gaming and personal data intersect. Rowenna Fielding, a data protection expert, walks us through the most efficient ways to understand a privacy policy. Professor Lorrie Cranor explains how these policies have warped our understanding of consent. And privacy lawyer Jenny Afia explains why "privacy" is a base element of being human. IRL is an original podcast from Firefox. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org. Charlie Warzel is an Opinion writer at large for the New York Times. You can get more insights from him about privacy online when you sign up for the Times’ Privacy Project Newsletter. If you’d like to learn more about privacy policies and their impact on our youth, check out Jenny Afia’s article on tech’s exploitative relationship with our children. This IRL podcast episode referenced several privacy policies, and we encourage you to read them. To start, here’s Firefox’s privacy policy. You’ll see that Firefox’s business model is not dependent on packaging your personal info. And, we hope you’ll find that our policy is easy-to-read, fully transparent, and specific. The other privacy policies referenced in this episode include: Google’s privacy policies Uber’s privacy policy Microsoft’s privacy policy Twitter’s privacy policy Facebook’s privacy policy
  4. When we shop online, we tend to think of it as a solitary experience free of sales associates and watchful eyes. But it turns out, some companies can see every move you make in their online stores, in real time.FeaturingJessica Testa: @jtesHadar Paz: @hadarpazLinks to resources discussed:They see you when you're shoppingPowerfrontHost:Arielle Duhaime-Ross (@adrs), host and lead reporter of ResetAbout Recode by Vox:Recode by Vox helps you understand how tech is changing the world — and changing us.Follow Us:Newsletter: Recode Daily Twitter: @Recode Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  5. Attorney General William Barr criticized Apple on Monday for not helping the Department of Justice get into the iPhones of the Florida naval base shooter. WSJ's Robert McMillan explains Apple's philosophy on letting the government in.
  6. By now most of us understand the privacy consequences of all the data we handed over to social media and Internet companies. But what happens to the huge amount of health information we generate from health apps, DNA kits, doctors' visits, blood tests and fitness trackers? Some of it's carefully protected by law. Other data -- including intimate details about our lives -- can be sold to brokers who trade it like a commodity. How worried should we be?
  7. Originally broadcast in April 2019. As we approach the end of 2019, the Financial Times recognizes Shoshana Zuboff's "The Age of Surveillance Capitalism" as one of the best business books of the year. Shoshana Zuboff doesn’t mince words when it comes to the data economy. According to Zuboff, author of the recent book *The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, *our very souls are at stake. But the seeds of surveillance capitalism were planted rather innocently, back in the heady days of the dotcom bubble. As Zuboff tells it, it all began with Google. When the young company entered crisis mode, they needed to find new ways to make money. And a whole new economic logic was born — one that has now spread across every sector of the economy, and has invaded every facet of our online lives. Zuboff warns that surveillance capitalism threatens much more than just our privacy. Find out more at rawdatapodcast.com
  8. David Carroll is an Associate Professor of Media Design at Parsons School of Design, and is one of the main subjects of the Netflix documentary, The Great Hack. David’s been an advocate for data privacy for many years and as we discover in the documentary, initiates a type of UK freedom of information request with a network of privacy activists that leads to the eventual downfall, exposure and bankruptcy of Cambridge Analytica.Follow us everywhere @TheWebbyAwardsKeep up with David-Michel @dmdlikesOur Producer is Terence BrosnanOur Editorial Lead is Jordana JarrettMusic is Podington Bear  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  9. Congressman Ro Khanna returns to Recode Decode to talk with Recode's Kara Swisher about his proposal for an "internet bill of rights," which Kara discussed in her latest column for the New York Times.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  10. Every day, our data hits the market when we sign online. It’s for sale, and we’re left to wonder if tech companies will ever choose to protect our privacy rather than reap large profits with our information. But, is the choice — profit or privacy — a false dilemma? Meet the people who have built profitable tech businesses while also respecting your privacy. Fact check if Facebook and Google have really found religion in privacy. And, imagine a world where you could actually get paid to share your data.In this episode, Oli Frost recalls what happened when he auctioned his personal data on eBay. Jeremy Tillman from Ghostery reveals the scope of how much ad-tracking is really taking place online. Patrick Jackson at Disconnect.me breaks down Big Tech’s privacy pivot. DuckDuckGo’s Gabriel Weinberg explains why his private search engine has been profitable. And Dana Budzyn walks us through how her company, UBDI, hopes to give consumers the ability to sell their data for cash.IRL is an original podcast from Firefox. For more on the series, go to irlpodcast.org.Read about Patrick Jackson and Geoffrey Fowler's privacy experiment.Learn more about DuckDuckGo, an alternative to Google search, at duckduckgo.com.And, we're pleased to add a little more about Firefox's business here as well — one that puts user privacy first and is also profitable. Mozilla was founded as a community open source project in 1998, and currently consists of two organizations: the 501(c)3 Mozilla Foundation, which backs emerging leaders and mobilizes citizens to create a global movement for the health of the internet; and its wholly owned subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation, which creates Firefox products, advances public policy in support of internet user rights and explores new technologies that give people more control and privacy in their lives online. Firefox products have never — and never will never — buy or sell user data. Because of its unique structure, Mozilla stands apart from its peers in the technology field as one of the most impactful and successful social enterprises in the world. Learn more about Mozilla and Firefox at mozilla.org.

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