Top Podcast Episodes for the History Classroom: World War One Edition

A curated episode list by

Creation Date October 27th, 2020
Updated Date Updated December 31st, 2020
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About This List

Sometimes it is difficult to wade through the sea of Podcasts to find episodes that are appropriate for the classroom. This list is designed for teachers to easily find episodes that are appropriate for the high school classroom. Top tips: Always listen before you play. Do some pre listening vocabulary. Have reflection questions and activities. You don't always have to listen to the entire episode. Model active listening by demonstrating how to take effective notes.
  1. An affecting photograph of a wounded unknown WW1 soldier takes Clare Wright deep into Anzac territory, to examine the physical and moral legacies of war.
  2. Mat speaks to historian Andy Robertshaw about medical treatment in the First World War. What care would a soldier receive on the battlefield, how was he evacuated and could he expect to survive? Presenter: Mat McLachlan Guest: Andy Robertshaw Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV Don't forget to subscribe and review the podcast!
  3. Mat speaks to historian Dr Aaron Pegram about the fascinating items relating to the Red Baron featured in the collection of the Australian War Memorial. Presenter: Mat McLachlan Guest: Dr Aaron Pegram Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV Don't forget to subscribe and review the podcast!
  4. This 2015 episode covers a black U.S. Army WWI unit that became one of the most decorated of the war. When these soldiers returned home, they were greeted as heroes, but were still targets of segregation, discrimination and oppression. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
  5. One of the most infamous aspects of World War I was its long, brutal stalemate along the enormous system of trenches known as the Western Front. The powers involved all expected the war to be over quickly, but it reached an impasse almost immediately. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
  6. Does Field Marshal Douglas Haig deserve his reputation? His performance as a wartime leader has been attacked in the 100 years since WW1; the 1960s book 'The Donkeys' and the film 'Oh! What a Lovely War' certainly did him no favours; before 'Blackadder' in the 1980s further scorned his abilities. More recently, Professor Gary Sheffield has labelled him 'controversial', but has defended Haig's performance. In this edition of the 'Versus History' Podcast, Elliott critiques Haig, while Patrick defends him; both draw on the very latest historiography and academic insight to formulate their arguments. On 1 July 1916, Haig ordered the Somme offensive in an attempt relieve the pressure on the French at Verdun and break the stalemate of the Western Front. The British army suffered 60,000 casualties on the first day, including 20,000 killed. This was the highest loss in British Army history. It should be noted, however, that the French line held at Verdun and after five months of fighting, the British made advances at the Somme. In July 1917, a new offensive - the Third Battle of Ypres (also known as Passchendaele) resulted in further heavy casualties, but did succeed in weakening the German army and laid the platform for its defeat in 1918. Listen to Elliott and Patrick go 'head-to-head' over this highly emotive and controversial topic, hoping to offer some clarity and perspective to the debate. Please visit www.versushistory.com for our terms of use.
  7. (Lucy) In popular memory and on the big screen, the First World War was fought in the mud of northern France — or maybe in the skies above it. But what about the war beyond the irreverently-nicknamed trenches? This episode will explore the war as it was fought in the wheat fields of Romania, in the plains of Cameroon, the waters of the Mediterranean, and the deserts of Libya. Examining lesser-known fronts of WWI will also show us different experiences, and different soldiers, as the imperial maps of the late nineteenth century were permanently altered.
  8. In this podcast Dan talks to Golden Globe winning film maker Sam Mendes about his new World War One film 1917.Based in part on an account told to Mendes by his paternal grandfather, Alfred Mendes, it chronicles the story of two young British soldiers at the height of WWI during Spring 1917.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  9. Suzie Grogan talks about the 'hidden illness' of World War One, now better known as shellshock or PTSD. Dan chats with her about the initial reception to cases of shellshock and how diagnoses changed as we understood the problem better over time.For ad free versions of our entire podcast archive and hundreds of hours of history documentaries, interviews and films, signup to History Hit TV. Use code 'pod4' at checkout to get a 30 day free trial and your first 4 months for £4/$4. Producer: Natt TapleyAudio: Peter Curry  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  10. Dr Bart Ziino (History, Deakin University) on the concept of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and how they represent the fallen of World War I who never returned. Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.
  11. Dr Janet Butler (History, La Trobe University) talks about the Australian women who went to the frontlines in World War I and supported their men in their time of need. Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.
  12. The fighting on the Western Front ended over 101 years ago, why is the First World War so important?Do you want to chat with other History of the Great War listeners, and yours truly, come hang out in Discord: https://discord.gg/ASbBjaTSupport the podcast on http://patreon.com/historyofthegreatwar where you can get access to special supporter only episodes.For a no strings attached donation: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=2528RCAZG4R3Y&source=urlWith time, every epilogue extends into a sequel.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  13. We speak to the Lord of the Rings director about They Shall Not Grow Old, his ambitious new film that recreates the First World War in colour  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  14. In her time of need the British Empire called upon her possessions around the world for assistance, and India answered.Do you want to chat with other History of the Great War listeners, and yours truly, come hang out in Discord: https://discord.gg/ASbBjaTSupport the podcast on http://patreon.com/historyofthegreatwar where you can get access to special supporter only episodes.For a no strings attached donation: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=2528RCAZG4R3Y&source=url Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  15. Erdem Koç (Journalism, La Trobe University) on the Turkish perspective of the Gallipoli campaign and the ANZAC legacy. Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.
  16. A bonus from the Don Watson interview that was the feature of last week's Redfern episode. To commemorate Remembrance Day (Armistice Day), speechwriter Don Watson talks about Paul Keating's beautiful 'Eulogy for the Unknown Soldier' that was delivered at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra on 11 November, 1993. The occasion was the interrment of the remains of one Australian solider, dug up from a battlefield on the Western Front. It is a revered speech in this country, the words are now chiselled into the Australian War Memorial itself and the phrase 'He is all of them, and he is one of us'; was even at the centre of a political stoush in 2013 over whether it should replace Kipling's 'Known Unto God' on the graves of Unknown Soldiers. (Kipling won the day). This is a shorter episode than the usual Speakola length. If you are interested in Don Watson and his speechwriitng career, the previous episode is much more detailed, and discusses Watson's somewhat broken relationship with the former Prime Minister. Watson's most recent books are 'There it is Again' (Collected Writings) and The Bush. If you'd like to donate to support Speakola in both its website and podcast form, Tony would appreciate any help in these covid times!  Tony's books are available online and at his website. Send an email to swap details for signed copies. He mentions The Minister for Traffic Lights in this episode, a picture book about a traffic light loving politician who invents a mauve traffic light as a cure for road rage. Episode supported by GreenSkin™ and PurpleSkin™ avocados at https://greenskinavocados.com.au/ Please subscribe to the podcast, visit Speakola,  and share any great speeches that are special to you, famous or otherwise. I just need transcript & photo /video embed. Speakola also has Twitter and Facebook feeds   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  17. November 11, 2018 is the 100th Anniversary of the end of World War I.  To mark this day, we bring you the story of one fearless woman and her ambulance.  Maud Fitch, a cowgirl from the desert between Nevada and Utah, wanted to join up when America entered WWI. Unable to enlist as a soldier (she was a woman, after all!) she purchased an ambulance and shipped it at her own expense to France, where … The post THE AMBULANCE DRIVER Maud Fitch appeared first on What'shername.
  18. Mat reviews the classic Australian film 'Gallipoli', starring Mel Gibson and directed by Peter Weir. How does it rate for both entertainment value and historical accuracy, and has it stood the test of time? Presenter: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV Don't forget to subscribe and review the podcast!
  19. On Christmas Eve 1914 many sectors of the Western Front in France and Belgium fell silent. Troops from all sides put down their weapons and sang carols, exchanged gifts and buried their dead in No Man's Land. The following day the truce continued in many, but not all areas, and troops gathered in crowds between the lines. there may even have been a bit of a kick about. This is part 1 of a two part Christmas podcast which explores the truce with three distinguished historians, Peter Hart, Taff Gillingham and Rob Schaefer. We also hear extracts of letters and diaries from the men involved, including some broadcast here for the first time in English. This is the story of the Christmas Truce. It accompanies our most ambitious TV project yet on History Hit TV where with the help of specialist extras we dramatise the events of that Christmas in 1914.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  20. Part Two of our special podcast mini series on the famous Christmas Truce. On Christmas Eve 1914 many sectors of the Western Front in France and Belgium fell silent. Troops from all sides put down their weapons and sang carols, exchanged gifts and buried their dead in No Man's Land. The following day the truce continued in many, but not all areas, and troops gathered in crowds between the lines. there may even have been a bit of a kick about. On this episode three distinguished historians, Peter Hart, Taff Gillingham and Rob Schaefer tell us about the events of the truce itself. We also hear extracts of letters and diaries from the men involved, including some broadcast here for the first time in English. This is the story of the Christmas Truce. It accompanies our most ambitious TV project yet on History Hit TV where with the help of specialist extras we dramatise the events of that Christmas in 1914.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  21. In this episode Colin and I look at the causes of World War I. We first discuss the components of the historical narrative and then move on to that very famous spark of the war: the assassination of Franz Ferdinand. We look at some of the long term causes of the war as well, including nationalism, militarism, imperialism and alliances (the MAIN causes). Please find us on twitter @WilliamHPalk or @C_duPlessis. If you want to join us on the show to discuss your teaching techniques, latest research or upcoming book, please do make contact! We want to grow the love for history.Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=Q8KGSAT37YCPA&source=url)

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