Where To Start With Planet Money

A curated episode list by

Creation Date July 31st, 2018
Updated Date Updated November 27th, 2020
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  1. In Japan, salmon used to be garbage fish. Today, it's a delicacy. How one Norwegian with a lot of extra fish changed the tastes of a nation.
  2. One Hollywood director leaves the world of big budget blockbusters for something even more lucrative: low budget Hollywood.
  3. Patty McCord helped create a workplace at Netflix that runs more like a professional sports team than a family. If you're not up to scratch, you're off the team. Is this the future of work?
  4. Gene Freidman built a taxi empire. We visited him before he was in legal trouble.
  5. Today on the show: the economics of drought, and why the rational thing to do in California right now is use more water.
  6. How the American auto industry is built on a trade dispute over frozen chicken parts.
  7. Red roses are a unique product — a commodity worth double the price for a very short, 24-hour period: Valentine's Day.To cash in on this demand, flower growers have to figure out how to make millions of roses bloom exactly the right amount, at exactly the right moment, in the middle of February — get them from farms in Africa and South America to your doorstep.On today's show: the logistical miracles and wild risks behind getting red roses to your Valentine.
  8. The world is running out of chocolate.  Cocoa is in short supply. Demand is way up, thanks to China and India developing a taste for the sweet stuff. And producing more cocoa isn't so easy. Cocoa is a fussy plant. It doesn't grow in very many places and it gets diseases really easily.  Today on the show, we learn about one man in Ecuador who came up with an answer to the global cocoa shortage. A warning here: if you're a die-hard chocolate lover, you might not like it.  For more: http://n.pr/1Dg2r5C
  9. A lot of computing pioneers were women. For decades, the number of women in computer science was growing. But in 1984, something changed.
  10. A California mall straddles the border between two cities — and the minimum wage is higher on one side.
  11. Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran in September 2013. Sure, some college degrees lead to higher paying jobs than others. But what's shocking — at least, it was shocking to us — is just how big the gap can be. The most lucrative majors typically lead to jobs with salaries over $100,000 a year. The least lucrative lead to salaries of around $30,000. On today's show, we run the numbers. We talk to people who majored in the most- and least-lucrative subjects. And we hear from an economist who says, when it comes to income, choosing a major is more important than choosing a college.
  12. Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran on May 11th, 2012. You can find more recent data on college costs here. On today's show, we visit beautiful Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania. Price of one year at Lafayette: $55,688. Up 63 percent from the price a decade ago. At least, that's the sticker price — the price you get if you add up tuition, room and board, and all the fees listed on the school's website. But there's a huge gap between the sticker price and what the average student actually pays after figuring in grants and scholarships. That's true at private colleges around the country. Nationwide, the average sticker price is more than twice as high as the price students actually pay, and the gap is getting wider. It turns out, it makes economic sense to have a high sticker price and offer lots of discounts. On the show today, we explain why.
  13. How much of a brand is real? How much is in our heads?
  14. First of five episodes. We're getting into the oil business. We go to Kansas, and negotiate with a preacher to buy 100 barrels of crude.
  15. Second of five episodes. Oil is priced down to the penny, and the price changes every day. Who sets that price?
  16. Third of five episodes. The Planet Money oil faces a test, we sell it, and we meet the man who set off the fracking boom in America.
  17. Fourth of five episodes. Oil is in our sneakers, our clothes, and the computer or phone you're using right now. On today's show: The story of the man who made it happen.
  18. Last of five episodes. We follow the Planet Money oil to a gas station. And we ask: What would our world look like if there were no fossil fuels?

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