Ask The Horse

A monthly Hobbies, Sports and Education podcast
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Your horse’s head, face, and mouth comprise sensitive nerves, bone, and soft tissue. While many of us focus on saddle fit, bridles and bits often get overlooked as a cause of discomfort. Bits can cause mouth pain and injury, and research shows many nosebands are adjusted too tight to the point of cruelty. Is your horse wearing the right bit and bridle?Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Hilary Clayton, Professor and Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair Emerita at Michigan State University. You'll learn about the importance of bit and bridle fit, how different types of bits fit and work in a horse's mouth, how to measure the tightness of a noseband, and much more! Dr. Hilary M. Clayton is a veterinarian, researcher and horsewoman. For more than 40 years she has performed innovative research in the areas of locomotor biomechanics, lameness, rehabilitation, conditioning programs for equine athletes, and the interaction between rider, tack, and horse. She has published seven books and more than 200 scientific articles on these topics. Clayton served as the Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Sports Medicine at Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine from 1997 until she retired from academia in 2014. She continues to perform collaborative research with colleagues in universities around the world. Clayton is a charter diplomate and past president of the American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation. She is an Honorary Fellow of the International Society for Equitation Science and has been inducted into the International Equine Veterinarians Hall of Fame, the Midwest Dressage Association Hall of Fame, and the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame. She is a lifelong rider and has competed in many equestrian sports, most recently focusing on dressage in which she trains through the Grand Prix level and has earned U.S. Dressage Federation bronze, silver, and gold medals.
From learning theory and counterconditioning to supplements and pharmaceutical options, we’ll take a look at ways to safely help nervous, high-strung, and energetic horses relax. Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Camie Heleski, PhD, and Jenny Biehunko, PhD. You’ll learn about different health conditions that might contribute to a horse’s anxiety, how to handle a herd bound horse, different medications and supplements to help horses relax, and much more! This event is brought to you by Confidence EQ by Bimeda.Dr. Camie Heleski is an instructor and adviser in the University of Kentucky equine science and management program. Previously, she worked at Michigan State University, where she was the two-year horse management program coordinator for 25 years. Her applied research interests include equine behavior and welfare, horse-human interactions, and working equids in the world’s developing regions. She’s currently president of the International Society for Equitation Science and has served as scientific chair for the National Farm Animal Care Council’s Canadian equine welfare code committee. Her equine research and outreach efforts have taken her to Brazil, Mexico, Honduras, Egypt, and Mali. She enjoys dressage with her Arabian gelding, MSU Ducati.Dr. Jenny Biehunko is a 1998 graduate of the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine. She’s practiced behavioral medicine in a private practice setting for over more than 20 years. In 2016, she began a residency with the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists, working toward a specialty in veterinary behavior. Dr. Biehunko teaches ethology and behavior at both the Auburn and Tuskegee Colleges of Veterinary Medicine, and she has a special interest in equine behavior, as well as integrating lower stress and humane handling methods into the veterinary and training communities. Her grandfather was an equine veterinarian and rider, and Jenny was raised with horses. She has a small herd of Arabian horses, and rides dressage, trail, and endurance.
Equine nutritionists and veterinarians agree: Forage should be the cornerstone of the equine diet. Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Laurie Lawrence, of the University of Kentucky, and Dr. Stephen Duren of Performance Horse Nutrition. You'll learn about different forage options for horses, including beet pulp, alfalfa, and more. This event is brought to you by Standlee Premium Western Forage. Dr. Laurie Lawrence is an equine programs professor in the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Her research interests include nutrient requirements of broodmares and foals, nutrient requirements of exercising horses, equine digestive physiology, pasture and forage utilization, and equine exercise physiology.Dr. Stephen Duren completed his Bachelor of Science in animal sciences at the University of Idaho. He earned a Master of Science and a Doctor of Philosophy in equine nutrition and exercise physiology from the University of Kentucky. His research focus centered around feeding fat to racehorses and changes in blood flow distribution in fed and fasted horses during exercise. Dr. Duren has now formed Performance Horse Nutrition, LLC, where he consults with feed manufacturers and horse owners throughout the world. He has owned competitive horses and understands the investment of time and training and realizes that diet should be a factor that helps the horse, not limits the horse. Dr. Duren has been pivotal in the way Standlee Premium Western Forage ensures their forage nutritional and quality excellence.
Few horses are lucky enough to have constant, year-round access to fresh, green grass, which provides the best natural source of vitamin E. This powerful antioxidant supports muscle and nerve health. Is your horse getting enough? Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Carrie Finno. You'll learn about horses' vitamin E requirements, signs of a vitamin E deficiency, and how natural sources of vitamin E compare to synthetic vitamin E. This event is brought to you by Kentucky Performance Products.Dr. Finno is an equine internist who serves as associate professor in veterinary genetics and the Gregory L. Ferraro Endowed Director of the Center for Equine Health at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis). She received her veterinary degree from the University of Minnesota in 2004 and then completed a three-year residency in large animal internal medicine at UC Davis. She elected to pursue a career in translational genetic research, with a strong focus on inherited neuromuscular diseases. Her research studies the interaction of vitamin E and neural development in a naturally occurring disease in the horse and using a well-established mouse model.
Do you manage a pastures for your horses? Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Krishona Martinson, PhD, MS, of the University of Minnesota Equine Extension Program. You’ll learn about grass health, maintenance, rotational grazing, weed control, dry lots, and much more.Dr. Krishona Martinson, is a professor of equine science and leads the University of Minnesota Extension Horse Program and is an equine extension specialist. Her applied research program focuses on improving equine forage utilization. She currently serves on the Equine Science Society board of directors. Along with her daughters, Dr. Martinson competes locally in timed events. 
Sometimes we as horse people get stuck in our traditions and habits or are influenced by mythology and marketing. But is there a better way? Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Camie Heleski of the University of Kentucky. You’ll learn about how equine welfare plays an important part in training and managing horses, how  equine welfare is measured, improvements we can make to our horses’ housing and lifestyles in order to improve their wellbeing, and much more.Dr. Camie Heleski is an instructor and adviser in the University of Kentucky equine science and management program. Previously, she worked at Michigan State University, where she was the two-year horse management program coordinator for 25 years. Her applied research interests include equine behavior and welfare, horse-human interactions, and working equids in the world’s developing regions. She’s currently president of the International Society for Equitation Science and has served as scientific chair for the National Farm Animal Care Council’s Canadian equine welfare code committee. Her equine research and outreach efforts have taken her to Brazil, Mexico, Honduras, Egypt, and Mali. She enjoys dressage with her Arabian gelding, MSU Ducati.
How cold is too cold to ride? Does your horse need a blanket? What should your horse eat during frigid weather? Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Karen Waite, PhD of Michigan State Extension. You'll learn about blanketing, winter horse nutrition, preventing injuries in icy pastures, and how to encourage horses to drink water during the colder weather. Dr. Karen Waite is part of Michigan State Extension, where she serves as an academic specialist and coordinator of the equine education undergraduate program. Her teaching responsibilities include a variety of equine courses. Additionally, she’s faculty advisor to the MSU Equestrian Team and Horsemen’s Association.
Do you have a young horse in your life? Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Brian Nielsen, a professor and researcher at Michigan State University. You'll learn about the importance of nutrition and exercise for growing foals, common developmental disorders, and how training can impact a horse's bone growth and development.Dr. Brian Nielsen is an animal science professor at Michigan State University, where he teaches senior level courses in equine exercise physiology and advanced horse management. His research interests include equine exercise physiology, young horse development, and nutrition.
Surviving natural disasters becomes even more complicated when you’re responsible for horses and other animals. Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews emergency planning expert Rebecca Gimenez-Husted, PhD. You'll learn about resources and information you need prior to a disaster, what supplies you'll need if you evacuate or shelter in place, and how you can keep both yourself and your horse safe during wildfires, tornadoes, and other disasters. Dr. Rebecca Gimenez-Husted is the primary instructor and president of Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue. Her first book, Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue, was published in 2008. She is an internationally sought instructor in technical rescue techniques, procedures, and methodologies, and she has published numerous critiques, articles, and journal submissions on horse safety, technical large animal rescue and horse handling issues.
Aging horses often require individualized care to keep them comfortable and happy. Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Bryan Waldridge of Park Equine in Lexington, Kentucky. You'll learn about managing older horses with PPID (equine Cushings) and metabolic syndrome, how to help the arthritic older horse, the special nutritional needs of senior horses, colic risk, and more.Dr. Waldridge is a veterinarian at Park Equine Hospital, in Lexington, Kentucky. He also serves as a veterinarian at Old Friends Thoroughbred Retirement Farm, where he cares for retired champion Thoroughbred racehorses. He received his veterinary degree from Auburn University, and upon graduation became a faculty member teaching large animal internal medicine at Tuskegee University and Auburn University. He then worked for Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital, in Lexington, as an internal medicine clinician. Dr. Waldridge also served as a resident veterinarian for Kentucky Equine Research, where he was responsible for herd health of research horses and overseeing nutritional research and new product development. He was also the treating veterinarian at the equine quarantine facility for the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. Most recently he worked for the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, where he was the treating veterinarian and worked the 2015 Breeders’ Cup at Lexington’s Keeneland Race Course. Dr. Waldridge has a special interest in internal medicine and clinical pathology. He and his wife, Sonja, reside in Georgetown, Kentucky.
Your horse’s feet are his foundation. What does a healthy hoof look like? Does your horse need shoes, or is he fine barefoot? And what about hoof boots? Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Scott Fleming, and equine podiatrist at Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital, in Lexington, Kentucky. You'll learn how to work with your farrier (or trimmer) and veterinarian to ensure your horse’s feet receive the right care.Dr. Fleming, originally from Northeast Texas, grew up riding Western performance Quarter Horses and working with cattle. Upon graduating from high school, he attended farrier school and maintained a Quarter-Horse-centric farrier business in Northeast and Central Texas. He also served in the Marine Corps Infantry for four years. Dr. Fleming received his DVM from Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences in 2013, completed an internship at Rood & Riddle in 2013-14, and remained at the hospital as a fellow. Currently, he is an associate veterinarian at Rood & Riddle. He also has a special interest in participating in Equitarian Initiative trips to Central America to help working equids in the region. Outside the clinic, Dr. Fleming enjoys spending time on the farm with his wife, Tina, and their two children, Callie and Case.
Summer is a great time to get out and enjoy your horse, but the season also comes with management challenges. As ambient temperatures rise, so does your horse’s risk of overheating. Horse trailers can become sweltering, stalls stifling, and exercise dangerous. Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Jeanette "Jay" Mero. You'll learn how to protect your horse from the heat during this information-packed hour. Dr. Mero graduated from Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in 1994 and then completed a large animal medicine and surgery internship at the Ontario Veterinary College at the University of Guelph. She spent 10 years in large animal practice in New York’s Finger Lakes region. In 2005, she and her family moved to Mariposa, California, where she established Mariposa Equine Services, a solo ambulatory equine practice. She’s been happily providing equine veterinary care in the foothills outside Yosemite National Park since 2006. One of the reasons Jay and her family moved to California was to become more involved in her greatest passion in life—besides her family and her work—the sport of endurance riding. Since arriving on the West Coast Jay and her family have logged thousands of endurance miles in competition. Mero has served as chair of the American Endurance Ride Conference’s Veterinary Committee since 2009.
Bugs are beyond annoying for our horses. Insects spread diseases—some of them deadly—and can cause irritating and performance-limiting allergic reactions. Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Erika Machtinger, PhD. You'll learn how to protect your horse during this information-packed hour, which covers stable flies, face flies, mosquitoes, gnats, ticks, and more. You'll also hear Dr. Machtinger's advice about selecting and applying the most effective fly sprays and using insect-control methods. Our guest for this episode is Erika Machtinger, PhD.Dr. Machtinger is a horse owner and an assistant professor of entomology (the study of insects) at Pennsylvania State University’s College of Agricultural Sciences, in University Park. Her research focuses on filth fly control in livestock, poultry, and equine facilities; transmission of zoonotic disease via arthropod vectors; and integrated tick management. Her work is an interdisciplinary combination of population and chemical ecology, behavior studies, parasitoid-host interactions, biological control, molecular biology, toxicology, and wildlife biology. She believes integrated research is necessary to develop novel control methods for disease-spreading insects and agricultural pests as health risks increase from population growth, climate change, and increased pesticide resistance.
Laminitis is one of the most common diseases in horses, and it has many different causes. Is your horse an easy keeper? He might be at risk. Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Teresa Burns, DVM, and Jane Manfredi, DVM. During this information-packed podcast, you'll learn about endocrine-related laminitis in horses with conditions such as PPID, equine metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance. The veterinarians also discuss which horses are more at risk for developing laminitis and share tips on how to manage horses during an acute laminitic episode.Teresa Burns, DVM, MS, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, is an associate professor of equine internal medicine at The Ohio State University, in Columbus. Her research interests include laminitis and endocrine-related diseases in horses.Jane Manfredi, DVM, MS, PhD, Dipl. ACVS-LA, Dipl. ACVSMR, is an assistant professor in pathobiology and diagnostic investigation at Michigan State University, in East Lansing, where she’s the primary investigator at the Equine and Comparative Orthopedic Rehabilitation and Endocrinology (ENCORE) lab. Her research includes nutritional supplement for improving insulin regulation in horses, equine rehabilitation, and equine osteoarthritis.
Choosing the right diet for your horse can be a daunting task. Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Clair Thunes, PhD, an independent equine nutritionist. You'll learn about horses' calorie requirements and how to safely change your horse's diet. Dr. Thunes also explains the differences between complete feeds, ration balancers, concentrates, and hay or forage pellets, as well as how to know your horse is getting the nutrients he or she needs. Dr. Thunes owns Summit Equine Nutrition, based in Gilbert, Arizona. She works as a consultant with owners/trainers and veterinarians across the United States and globally to take the guesswork out of feeding horses and provides services to select companies. As a nutritionist she works with all equids, from WEG competitors to Miniature donkeys and everything in between. Born in England, she earned her undergraduate degree at Edinburgh University, in Scotland, and her master’s and doctorate in nutrition at the University of California, Davis. Growing up, she competed in an array of disciplines and was an active member of the U.K. Pony Club. Today, she serves as the district commissioner for the Salt River Pony Club. 
Join our host, Michelle Anderson of TheHorse.com, as she interviews Dr. Kevin Haussler about equine back pain during April 2019's Ask The Horse Live, a live event that focuses on your horse health questions. Dr. Haussler is an associate professor at the Colorado State University (CSU) Orthopaedic Research Center, where his research focuses on the equine neck and back. During this hour, you'll learn about what causes horses to experience back pain, how it’s diagnosed, and how to make your horse more comfortable.Kevin K. Haussler, DVM, DC, PhD, Dipl. ACVSMR, graduated from The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1988 before completing a small animal internship. To further his training in conservatively managing spinal-related disorders, he pursued human training at Palmer College of Chiropractic-West and completed a veterinary chiropractic certification program in 1993. He completed his PhD, focusing on spinal pathology and pelvic biomechanics in Thoroughbred racehorses, from the University of California, Davis, and then studied equine spinal kinematics at Cornell University. While at Cornell, he directed the newly formed large and small animal Integrative Medicine Service. Currently, Dr. Haussler is an associate professor at the Colorado State University (CSU) Orthopaedic Research Center, where he’s involved in teaching, clinical duties, and researching. He is a charter diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation and a course instructor for the Equine Rehabilitation Certification course, co-branded by the University of Tennessee and CSU.
Why are there so many equine infectious anemia cases in the news, and how can you protect your horse from this deadly disease? Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Angela Pelzel-McCluskey, the equine epidemiologist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and Veterinary Services. You'll learn more about EIA, why it's important to test your horse annually, and how to protect your horse.Dr. Pelzel-McCluskey is based in Fort Collins, Colorado. Pelzel-McCluskey obtained her veterinary degree in 2001 from Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. She worked in equine private practice in both Texas and Colorado and has served as an epidemiologist with state and federal animal health agencies since 2004. She currently oversees the federal response to reportable equine disease outbreaks nationwide and has been the lead epidemiologist for more than 25 state, regional, and national disease outbreak responses during her combined state and federal service.
Join our host, Michelle Anderson, as she interviews Dr. Ryan Ferris of Summit Equine. You’ll learn about how to select the right stallion for your mare, breeding soundness exams, factors that affect fertility, and breeding the performance mare. Dr. Ryan Ferris owns Summit Equine in Newberg, Oregon, with his wife, Dr. Dora Ferris. The practice specializes in equine reproduction and sports medicine. He graduated from veterinary school at Washington State University in 2007 and then completed an internship in equine surgery, medicine and reproduction at the Equine Medical Center of Ocala in 2008. He subsequently completed a two-year equine theriogenology residency program at Colorado State University (CSU) and worked at its Equine Reproduction Laboratory from several years.
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Podcast Details

Created by
The Horse: Your Guide to Equine Health Care
Podcast Status
Hiatus/Finished
Started
Jan 17th, 2019
Latest Episode
Aug 14th, 2020
Release Period
Monthly
Episodes
18
Avg. Episode Length
About 1 hour
Explicit
No
Order
Episodic
Language
English

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