Ben Franklin's World

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We’re living in a period of climate change. Our Earth has been getting warmer since the mid-19th century. So how will humans adapt to and endure this period of global warming? Will they adapt to it and endure? It turns out the people of early America also lived through a period of climate change and their experiences may hold some answers for us. Sam White, an Associate Professor at The Ohio State University and author of A Cold Welcome: The Little Ice Age and Europe’s Encounter, joins us to explore the Little Ice Age and how it impacted initial European exploration and colonization of North America. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/189   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute  The Ben Franklin's World Shop  Complementary Episodes Episode 015: Joyce Chaplin, Round About the Earth Episode 049: Malcolm Gaskill, How the English Became America Episode 079: James Horn, What Are Historical Sources (Colonial Jamestown) Episode 116: Erica Charters, Disease & the Seven Years’ War Episode 127: Caroline Winterer, American Enlightenments Episode 267: Thomas Wickman, Snowshoe Country Listen! Apple Podcasts  Spotify  Google Podcasts  Ben Franklin's World iOS App  Ben Franklin's World Android App  Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group  Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast  Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page  Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter 
How and where did the colonies of North America and the Caribbean fit within the British Empire? The answer to this question depends on whether you explore the views of a British imperial officer, such as the King of England, or a colonist who lived in one of the North American or Caribbean colonies. In today’s episode, Abigail Swingen, professor of history at Texas Tech University and author of Competing Visions of Empire: Labor, Slavery, and the Origins of the British Atlantic Empire, leads us on an exploration of how colonists and British imperial officers viewed the colonies and their place within the British Empire during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/036   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute  The Ben Franklin's World Shop  Complementary Episodes Episode 162: Dunmore’s New World: The British Empire and the American Revolution Episode 186: Max Edelson, The New Map of the British Empire Episode 229: Patrick Griffin, The Townshend Moment Episode 236: Daniel Livesay, Mixed-Race Britons & the Atlantic Family Episode 252: Matthew Dziennik, The Highland Soldier in North America Listen! Apple Podcasts  Spotify  Google Podcasts  Ben Franklin's World iOS App  Ben Franklin's World Android App  Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group  Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page  Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter 
When did the fighting of the American War for Independence end? In school we learn that the war came to an end at the Battle of Yorktown. But, this lesson omits all of the fighting that took place after Charles, Earl Cornwallis’ surrender in October 1781. Don Glickstein, author of After Yorktown: The Final Struggle for American Independence, takes us on a whirlwind and global tour of the fighting that took place after Yorktown. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/081   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute  The Ben Franklin's World Shop  Complementary Episodes Episode 012: Dane Morrison, True Yankees Episode 037: Kathleen DuVal, Independence Lost Episode 163: The American Revolution in North America Episode 164: The American Revolution in the Age of Revolutions Episode 165: The Age of Revolutions Episode 208: Nathaniel Philbrick, Turning Points of the American Revolution Listen! Apple Podcasts  Spotify  Google Podcasts  Ben Franklin's World iOS App  Ben Franklin's World Android App  Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group  Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page  Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter 
Located 600 miles inland from Philadelphia and over 700 miles from Québec City, early Detroit could have been a backwater, a frontier post that Europeans established to protect colonial settlements from Native American attacks. Yet Detroit emerged as a cosmopolitan entrepôt filled with many different people and all of the goods you would expect to find in early Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, or Charleston. Today, we explore the early history of Detroit with Catherine Cangany, an associate professor of history at the University of Notre Dame and author of Frontier Seaport: Detroit’s Transformation into an Atlantic Entrepôt.  Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/051 Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute  The Ben Franklin's World Shop  Complementary Episodes Episode 028: Janice Fontanella, Building the Erie Canal Episode 029: Colin Calloway, The Victory with No Name Episode 162: Dunmore’s New World: The British Empire and the American Revolution Episode 113: Brian Murphey, Building the Empire State Episode 186: Max Edelson, The New Map of the British Empire Episode 223: Susan Sleeper-Smith, A Native American History of the Ohio River Valley & Great Lakes Region Listen! Apple Podcasts  Spotify  Google Podcasts  Ben Franklin's World iOS App  Ben Franklin's World Android App  Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group  Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page  Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter 
When we think about North America during the American Revolution, most of our brains show us images of eastern Canada and the thirteen British American colonies that waged a revolution and war for independence against Great Britain. But what about the rest of the North American continent? What about the areas that we know today as the midwest, the Great Plains, the southwest, the west, and the Pacific Northwest? What about Alaska? What went on in these areas during the American Revolution? What did the American Revolution look like through the eyes of Native American peoples? In this episode of the Doing History: To the Revolution series, we explore what the American Revolution looked like within the larger context of North American history with historians Claudio Saunt and Alyssa Mt. Pleasant. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/163   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute OI Reader William and Mary Quarterly-Journal of the Early Republic special American Revolution issue $10 Promotion The Great Courses Plus (1 Free Month of Unlimited Courses)   Complementary Episodes Episode 014: Claudio Saunt, West of the Revolution Episode 029: Colin Calloway, The Victory With No Name Episode 109: John Dixon, The American Enlightenment & Cadwallader Colden Episode 123: Revolutionary Allegiances Episode 151: Defining the American Revolution Episode 158: The Revolutionaries’ Army   Complementary Blog Posts Rachel Hermann, "Histories of Hunger in the American Revolution"   YouTube Videos of Episode Music Men's Smoke Dance Salamanca Powwow 2017 Third Round Water Song by Akwesasne Women Singers   Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App  
What caused the American Revolution? Was it the issue of ‘No Taxation without Representation?’ Was it conflict and change in the social order of colonial and British society? Or, was the Revolution about differences in ideas about governance and the roles government should play in society? In this episode of the Doing History: To the Revolution series, we explore one set of ideas about the origins of the American Revolution with Bernard Bailyn, a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/048   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Doing History: To the Revolution! OI Reader app Hello Fresh (Promo Code: BFWorld30)   Complementary Episodes Episode 107: Mary Sarah Bilder, Madison’s Hand Episode 119: Steve Pincus, The Heart of the Declaration Episode 127: Caroline Winterer, American Enlightenments Episode 141: A Declaration in Draft Episode 151: Defining the American Revolution     Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
Declaring independence from Great Britain required the formation of new governments. But why did Americans want and need new governments? And how did their interactions and experiences with their old, colonial governments inform their decisions to create new governments? Barbara Clark Smith, a curator in the division of political history at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the author of The Freedoms We Lost: Consent and Resistance in Revolutionary America, leads us on an exploration of how Americans interacted with their government before the American Revolution and how the Revolution changed their interaction and ideas about government. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/154   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute  William and Mary Quarterly OI Reader App William and Mary Quarterly-Journal of the Early Republic joint issue on the American Revolution special discount   Complementary Episodes Episode 036: Abigail Swingen, Competing Visions of Empire Episode 049: Malcolm Gaskill, How the English Became American Episode 141: A Declaration in Draft Episode 150: Abigail Adams, Revolutionary Speculator Episode 152: Origins of the American Revolution Episode 153: Governments of the American Revolution Bonus: J.L. Bell, The Boston Stamp Act Riots     Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
Between 1775 and 1783, an estimated 230,000 men served in the Continental Army with another approximately 145,000 men serving in state militia units. But who were the men who served in these military ranks? What motivated them to take up arms and join the army? And what was their military experience like? In this episode of the Doing History: To the Revolution series we begin a 2-episode exploration of some of the military aspects of the American Revolution by exploring the experiences of the approximately 6,000-7,000 African American men who served in the Continental Army. Our guide for this exploration is Judith Van Buskirk, a professor of history at the State University of New York, Cortland and the author of Standing in Their Own Light: African American Patriots in the American Revolution. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/157   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute William and Mary Quarterly OI Reader App William and Mary Quarterly-Journal of the Early Republic joint issue on the American Revolution special discount   Complementary Episodes Episode 016: Alan Taylor, The Internal Enemy   Episode 118: Christy Clark-Pujara, The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island Episode 123: Revolutionary Allegiances Episode 126: Rebecca Brannon, The Reintegration of American Loyalists Episode 137: Erica Dunbar, The Washington’s Runaway Slave, Ona Judge Episode 153: Committees and Congress: Governments of the American Revolution       Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
On April 18, 1775, Paul Revere rode to Lexington, Massachusetts to spread the alarm that the Regulars were marching. Revere made several important rides between 1774 and 1775, including one in September 1774 that brought the Suffolk Resolves to the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia. So why is it that we remember Paul Revere’s ride to Lexington and not any of his other rides? Why is it that we remember Paul Revere on the night of April 18, 1775 and nothing about his life either before or after that famous ride? Why is it that Paul Revere seems to ride quickly into history and then just as quickly out of it? In this episode we speak with four scholars to explore Paul Revere’s ride through history. Show Notes: http://www.benfranklinsworld.com/130   About the Series The mission of episodes in the Doing History: To the Revolution series is to ask not just “what is the history of the American Revolution?” but “what are the histories of the American Revolution?” Episodes in this series will air beginning in Fall 2017. The Doing History series is part of a partnership between Ben Franklin’s World and the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture. Be sure to check out Doing History season 1: Doing History: How Historians Work.   Bonus Content Episode Bibliography Doing History: To the Revolution! OI Reader   Complementary Episodes   Episode 059: Eric Foner, The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad Episode 075: Peter Drummey, How Archives Work (History of Paul Revere’s Accounts of his Ride) Episode 106: Jane Kamensky, The World of John Singleton Copley Episode 112: Mary Beth Norton, The Tea Crisis of 1773 Episode 123: Revolutionary Allegiances Episode 128: Alan Taylor, American Revolutions: A Continental History Episode 129: John Bell, The Road to Concord, 1775     Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App
What happened to the loyalists who stayed in the United States after the War for Independence? After the war, 60,000 loyalists and 15,000 slaves evacuated the United States. But thousands more opted to remain in the new nation. Rebecca Brannon, an Associate Professor of History at James Madison University and author of From Revolution to Reunion: The Reintegration of South Carolina Loyalists, joins us to explore what happened to the loyalists who stayed. Show Notes: http://www.benfranklinsworld.com/126   Sponsor Links Delanceyplace.com "Not One, But Ninety Declarations of Independence"   Complementary Episodes Episode 037: Kathleen DuVal, Independence Lost Episode 046: John Ferling: Whirlwind: The American Revolution & the War That Won It Episode 085: Bonnie Huskins, American Loyalists in Canada Episode 118: Christy Clark-Pujara, The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island Episode 123: Revolutionary Allegiances   Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
Our present-day American culture is obsessed with sports. To cite just two pieces of evidence of this, on average, more than 67,000 fans attend each National Football League game and more than 30,000 fans attend each Major League Baseball game. This is to say nothing of the millions of fans who watch these sports on television or listen to them on the radio. When did America become a place filled with sports nuts? When did the business of professional sports become a thing in the United States? Early American history has answers for us as does Kenneth Cohen, a curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the author of They Will Their Game: Sporting Culture and the Making of the American Republic. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/187   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Audible.com (30-Day Free Trial and 1 Free Audiobook)     Complementary Episodes Episode 135: Julie Holcomb, Moral Commerce: The Transatlantic Boycott of the Slave Labor Economy Episode 136: Jennifer Van Horn, Material Culture and the Making of America Episode 140: Tamara Thornton, Nathaniel Bowditch: 19th-Century Man of Business, Science, and the Sea Episode 144: Robert Parkinson, The Common Cause of the American Revolution   Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
We’re living in a period of climate change. Our Earth has been getting warmer since the mid-19th century. So how will humans adapt to and endure this period of global warming? Will they adapt to it and endure? It turns out the people of early America also lived through a period of climate change and their experiences may hold some answers for us. Sam White, an Associate Professor at The Ohio State University and author of A Cold Welcome: The Little Ice Age and Europe’s Encounter, joins us to explore the Little Ice Age and how it impacted initial European exploration and colonization of North America. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/189   Meet Ups Boston History Camp Boston Meet Up: July 8, 10am Meet at the corner of Park Street and Tremont Street on Boston Common Cleveland Meet Up: Saturday July 21   Episode 200 Tell Liz what would you like to know about early American history?   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Great Courses Plus (Free Trial)   Complementary Episodes Episode 015: Joyce Chaplin, Round About the Earth Episode 049: Malcolm Gaskill, How the English Became America Episode 079: James Horn, What Are Historical Sources (Colonial Jamestown) Episode 116: Erica Charters, Disease & the Seven Years’ War Episode 127: Caroline Winterer, American Enlightenments   Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
The Confederation period is one of the most neglected aspects of United States History. And yet, it’s a very important period. Between 1781 and 1789, the Confederation Congress established by the Articles of Confederation had to deal with war, economic depression, infighting between the states, trouble in the west, foreign meddling, and domestic insurrection. It’s a critical period where no one knew whether the United States would survive as an independent nation. George William Van Cleve, a researcher in law and history at the University of Seattle Law School and author of We Have Not A Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution, takes us into the Confederation period so we can discover more about the Articles of Confederation, the government it established, and the problems that government confronted. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/179 *Correction: After production we noticed that in her second question to George, Liz noted the Articles of Confederation has a history that begins in 1787. Liz misspoke. The Second Continental Congress drafted the Articles of Confederation in 1777, ratified them in 1781, and they remained the active constitution of the United States until 1789, when the Constitution of 1787 went into effect on March 4, 1789.   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme Citizen Transcriber Sign Up   Complementary Episodes Episode 018: Danielle Allen, Our Declaration Episode 062: Carol Berkin, The Bill of Rights Episode 107: Mary Sarah Bilder, Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention Episode 119: Steven Pincus: The Heart of the Declaration Episode 141: Drafting the Declaration of Independence Episode 143: Michael Klarman, The Making of the United States Constitution Episode 155: Pauline Maier’s American Revolution     Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
George Washington played three very important public roles during his lifetime. He served as the Commander in Chief of the Continental Army, the President of the Constitutional Convention, and as the first President of the United States. In addition to these important public roles, Washington also played a role that was very important to him. He served as a farmer and agricultural innovator. Douglas Bradburn, the CEO and President of George Washington’s Mount Vernon, joins us so we can explore the history of Washington’s storied estate and his agricultural practices. Plus, we’ll also discover all that Mount Vernon has to offer us as a historic site. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/183   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Listener Survey   Complementary Episodes Episode 033: Douglas Bradburn, George Washington & His Library Episode 060: David Preston, Braddock’s Defeat Episode 061: Edward Larson, George Washington in Retirement Episode 077: Rinker Buck, The Oregon Trail Episode 103: Sara Bon-Harper, James Monroe & His Highland Estate Episode 137: Erica Dunbar, The Washingtons’ Runaway Slave Ona Judge     Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App
In 1535, Spanish holdings in the Americas proved so great that the Spanish government created the Viceroyalty of New Spain to govern all territory north of the Isthmus of Panama. The jurisdiction of New Spain included areas of upper and lower California and large areas of the American southwest and southeast, including Florida. Karoline Cook, author of Forbidden Passages: Muslims and Moriscos in Colonial Spanish America, serves as our guide as we explore some of the political, cultural, and religious history of New Spain. Specifically, how Spaniards and Spanish Americans used ideas about Muslims and a group of “new Christian” converts called Moriscos to define who could and should be able to settle and help colonies North America. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/048   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute HelloFresh (Promo Code BFWorld30)   Complementary Episodes Episode 082: Alejandra Dubcovsky, Information & Communication in the Early American South Episode 090: Caitlin Fitz, Age of American Revolutions Episode 110: Joshua Taylor, How Genealogists Research Episode 114: Karin Wulf, The History of Genealogy in British North America Episode 139: Andés Reséndez, The Other Slavery: Indian Enslavement in the Americans Episode 161: Smuggling and the American Revolution     Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.    
The histories of early North America and the Caribbean are intimately intertwined. The same European empires we encounter in our study of early America also appear in the Caribbean. The colonies of these respective empires often traded goods, people, and ideas between each other. Marisa Fuentes, an associate professor of history and women and gender studies at Rutgers University and author of Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive, joins us to explore some of the connections mainland North America and the British Caribbean shared in their practices of slavery in urban towns. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/173   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme Citizen Transcriber Sign Up   Complementary Episodes Episode 066: Simon Newman, How Historians Find Their Research Topics Episode 083: Jared Hardesty, Unfreedom: Slavery in Colonial Boston Episode 084: Zara Anishanslin, How Historians Read Historical Sources Episode 161: Smuggling and the American Revolution   Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
New England was a place with no cash crops. It was a place where many of its earliest settlers came to live just so they could worship their Puritan faith freely. New England was also a place that became known for its strong anti-slavery sentiment during the 19th century. So how did New England also become a place that practiced slavery? Wendy Warren, an Assistant Professor of History at Princeton University and author of the Pulitzer Prize-finalist book New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America, joins us to explore why New Englanders practiced slavery and just how far back the region’s slave past goes. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/170   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Great Courses Plus (Free Trial)   Complementary Episodes Episode 064: Brett Rushforth, Native American Slavery in New France Episode 083: Jared Hardesty, Unfreedom: Slavery in Colonial Boston Episode 104: Andrew Lipman, The Saltwater Frontier: Europeans & Native Americans on the Northeastern Coast Episode 118: Christy Pujara-Clark, The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island Episode 139: Andrés Reséndez, The Other Slavery: Indian Enslavement in the Americas Episode 142: Manisha Sinha, A History of Abolition Episode 166: Freedom and the American Revolution     Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
History books like to tell us that Native Americans did not fully understand British methods and ideas of trade. Is this really true? Did Native Americans only understand trade as a form of simplistic, gift exchange? Jessica Stern, a Professor of History at California State University, Fullerton and the author of The Lives in Objects: Native Americans, British Colonists, and Cultures of Labor and Exchange in the Southeast, takes us on a journey into the southeast during the early 18th century to show us how trade between Native Americans and British colonists really took place. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/171   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Hello Fresh (Promo Code: BFWorld30) The Great Courses Plus (Free Trial)   Complementary Episodes Episode 056: Daniel J. Tortora, The Anglo-Cherokee War, 1759-1761 Episode 091: Gregory Dowd, Rumors, Hoaxes, and Legends in Early America Episode 104: Andrew Lipmann, The Saltwater Frontier: Europeans & Native Americans on the Northeastern Coast Episode 158: The Revolutionaries’ Army Episode 163: The American Revolution in North America     Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
For the American Revolution to be successful, it needed ideas people could embrace and methods for spreading those ideas. It also needed ways for revolutionaries to coordinate across colonial lines. How did revolutionaries develop and spread their ideas? How did they communicate and coordinate plans of action? Joseph Adelman, an Assistant Professor of History at Framingham State University and author of Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789, joins us to investigate the roles printers and their networks played in developing and spreading ideas of the American Revolution. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/243 Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 112: Mary Beth North, The Tea Crisis of 1773 Episode 144: Robert Parkinson, The Common Cause of the American Revolution Episode 200: Everyday Life in Early America Episode 207: Nick Bunker, Young Benjamin Franklin Episode 227: Kyle Courtney, Copyright & Fair Use in Early America Episode 229: Patrick Griffin, The Townshend Moment Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter *Books purchased through the links on this post will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
Spain became the first European power to use the peoples, resources, and lands of the Americas and Caribbean as the basis for its Atlantic Empire. How did this empire function and what wealth was Spain able to extract from these peoples and lands? Molly Warsh, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh and author of American Baroque: Pearls and the Nature of Empire, 1492-1700, helps us investigate answers to these questions by showing us how Spain attempted to increase its wealth and govern its empire through its American and Caribbean pearl operations. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/241   Meet Ups Pittsburgh Meet Up, June 15, 2:30pm Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Save 40 percent on American Baroque (Use Promo Code 01BFW) Complementary Episodes Episode 015: Joyce Chaplin, Round About the Earth Episode 082: Alejandra Dubcovsky, Information & Communication in the Early American South Episode 139: Andrés Reséndez, The Other Slavery: Indian Enslavement in the Americas Episode 167: Eberhard Faber, The Early History of New Orleans Episode 178: Karoline Cook, Muslims & Moriscos in Colonial Spanish America Episode 224: Kevin Dawson, Aquatic Culture in Early America   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter *Books purchased through the links on this post will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
Have you ever wondered where the Christmas traditions of stockings, presents, and cookies come from? What about jolly, old Saint Nicholas? Who was he and why do we often call him Santa Claus? Peter G. Rose, culinary historian of Dutch foodways in North America and author of Delicious December: How the Dutch Brought Us Santa, Presents, and Treats joins us to discuss the origins of Santa Claus and edible goodies such as cookies in the United States. This episode originally posted as Episode 009.   Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/218   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Chicago 2019 Meetup   Complementary Episodes Episode 035: Michael Lord, Historic Hudson Valley & Washington Irving Episode 121: Wim Klooster, The Dutch Moment in the 17th-Century Atlantic World Episode 161: Smuggling and the American Revolution Episode 185: Joyce Goodfriend, Who Should Rule at Home?   Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
Inns and taverns played prominent roles in early American life. They served the needs of travelers who needed food to eat and places to sleep.They offered local communities a form of poor relief. And they functioned as public spaces where men could gather to discuss news, organize movements, and to drink and play cards. Adrian Covert, author of Taverns of the American Revolution, helps us explore taverns and the many roles they played in early American life. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/219   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute OI Books (Use promo code 01DAH40 to save 40 percent) Denver Meet Up Saturday, January 19, 3:30pm at Prost Brewing  Complementary Episodes Bonus: Longfellow’s Wayside Inn Episode 112: The Tea Crisis of 1773 Episode 160: The Politics of Tea Episode 161: Smuggling and the American Revolution Episode 187: Kenneth Cohen, Sport in Early America Episode 200: Everyday Life in Early America     Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
La Presidente? The Presidentess? The First Lady of the Land? The Second Article of the United States Constitution defines the Executive Branch of the government, the powers it has, and the role of the chief executive, the President of the United States. But what about the position of the President’s spouse? Jeanne Abrams, a Professor at the University Libraries and the Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Denver, joins us to explore the lives and work of the first First Ladies of the American Republic with details from her book, First Ladies of the Republic: Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, and Dolley Madison and the Creation of an Iconic American Role. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/205   Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute OI Special Events   Complementary Episodes Episode 005: Jeanne Abrams, Revolutionary Medicine Episode 074: Mary Wigge, Martha Washington Episode 137: Erica Dunbar, The Washingtons’ Runaway Slave, Ona Judge Episode 150: Woody Holton, Abigail Adams: Revolutionary Spectator Episode 193: Partisans: The Friendship & Rivalry of Adams & Jefferson   Helpful Show Links Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
When we think of the French and Indian, or Seven Years’ War, we often think of battles: The Monongahela, Ticonderoga, Québec. Yet, wars aren’t just about battles. They’re about people and governments too. In this episode, we explore a very different aspect of the French and Indian or Seven Years’ War. We explore the war through the lens of disease and medicine and how disease prompted the British government to take steps to keep its soldiers healthy. Our guide for this investigation is Erica Charters, an Associate Professor of the History of Medicine at the University of Oxford and author of Disease, War, and the Imperial State: The Welfare of British Armed Forces during the Seven Years’ War. Show Notes: http://www.benfranklinsworld.com/048   Sponsor Links Cornell University Press Episode 109: John Dixon, The Enlightenment of Cadwallader Colden   Helpful Show Links Help Support Ben Franklin's World Crowdfunding Campaign Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Join the Ben Franklin's World Community Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App   Complementary Episodes Episode 060: David Preston, Braddock’s Defeat Episode 086: George Goodwin, Benjamin Franklin in London Episode 091: Gregory Dowd, Rumors, Legends, and Hoaxes in Early America Episode 108: Ann Little, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright   *Books purchased through this link will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.
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Podcast Details

Started
Sep 27th, 2014
Latest Episode
Aug 11th, 2020
Release Period
Weekly
No. of Episodes
314
Avg. Episode Length
About 1 hour
Explicit
No
Order
Episodic

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