Crosscut Talks Podcast

Crosscut Talks

A News and Politics podcast
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President Donald Trump has made immigration a cornerstone of his political agenda. And his rhetoric, while inflaming his critics and galvanizing his base, is not always based in fact. That makes it difficult for journalists, who are attempting to report accurately on everything from migrant caravans to family separation. And for advocates and activists, there's new urgency to counter the administration's narrative. Crosscut brought a few of those perspectives together, to talk about the president's rhetoric and his administration's approach to immigration policy. Sarah Stillman of the New Yorker and Aura Bogado of Reveal discuss their groundbreaking reporting work, while Jorge Baron of the Northwest Immigrant Right Project and Maru Mora Villalpando share tales from the realm of immigrant advocacy. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
In America, Civil War as long been relegated to history books and Ken Burns films. But recently it has become a live topic. Crosscut gathered a panel of political experts and journalists to discuss the deepening tribalism of extreme partisan politics, identifying root causes of our divisions, discussing the platforms that have encouraged this divisiveness, and exploring what can be done to prevent it. Featuring Manhattan Institute fellow Oren Cass, New York Times columnist Thomas Edsall, political science professor Christopher Parker and journalist Tay Wiles. New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie moderated the conversation. This episode was recorded on May 4, 2019 at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.Note: This episode contains adult language. To listen to a bleeped version, visit our episode page.
Some activists need to use loudspeakers, but others are fortunate enough to already have the world’s attention. Colin Kaepernick, for example, showed how a single act — and the commitment to repeat it — can both inspire and agitate on a national scale. But how does one turn fame into societal change? Prominent social justice activist and author DeRay McKesson leads a conversation with hip-hop artist Macklemore and Super Bowl champion Doug Baldwin Jr. about how the two socially active figures choose a cause, make positive change, and keep working through it all. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019 at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.Note: This episode contains adult language. For a bleeped version, go to our episode page.
he #MeToo movement has hit every corner of the U.S., and there have been public accusations of sexual harassment and assault in almost every high profile industry, from Hollywood to politics to the news media. The music industry is no different. Sexual abuse allegations against R&B singer R. Kelly and sexual harassment allegations against alt-rock star Ryan Adams have forced the music business to face a reckoning. For this episode of Crosscut Talks, we invited the hosts of the KUOW podcast Battle Tactics for Your Sexist Workplace to discuss the persistent imbalance of power in the music industry with two women who know it well: Flavr Blue lead vocalist and activist Hollis Wong-Wear and Black Tones lead guitarist and KEXP DJ Eva Walker. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
The financial side of the news business has been struggling for decades now, and 2019 has been an especially bad year. Downsizing and closures continue across the country. Buzzfeed, Vice and the Huffington Post all announced major layoffs in recent months, and at least a dozen local news outlets have either eliminated positions or folded completely. Here in Seattle, where there is only one major daily newspaper left, City Arts magazine and Seattle Weekly both recently ended their print runs. Is there any hope left for the business of journalism. For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, we gathered a panel of Seattle media leaders to weigh in. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University for the Crosscut Festival.
In January 2017 Bob Ferguson became the first state attorney general to sue the Trump Administration. That was in response to the president's attempt to ban travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries. Since then, the Washington state attorney general has filed 40 additional lawsuits against the administration. So far, Ferguson has won around half of those case and the Trump administration hasn't won any. For this episode of Crosscut Talks, we invited Ferguson to discuss all of these efforts and the changing role of attorneys general in American politics. Speaking with Ferguson is Emily Bazelon, a staff writer at the New York Times Magazine and author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration. This episode was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University for the Crosscut Festival. 
Climate change is impacting our planet, and it's also impacting us — our emotions, our psychology and our worldview. And now, it's a concept that artists and curators are tackling too. The art they create and select helps translate and explore some of these impacts and underscores the connection between art and the environment. For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, we invited four artists and curators to discuss the work they do and the role they play in a climate-changing world. Taking part in the talk are mixed-media installation artist RYAN! Feddersen, art historian and curator Barbara Matilsky, sound artist Judy Twedt and conceptual artist Chris Jordan. This episode was recorded at Seattle University on May 4, 2019 as part of the Crosscut Festival. During the panel we displayed some of the art work under discussion. To see this work, go to the episode page.
Journalism has played a prominent role in the #MeToo era. Since the revelation in the New York Times of the accusations of sexual assault against movie producer Harvey Weinstein, more and more survivors have spoken out publicly about their experiences. And many of those have turned to reporters with their stories. For this episode of Crosscut Talks, we invited three journalists who have investigated some of those allegations to discuss the challenges of that reporting, the responses to it, and the impact that the #MeToo movement has had on their work and our culture at large. Featuring the Washington Post's Emma Brown; Sydney Brownstone of the Seattle Times and, previously, KUOW; and Rachel La Corte from the Associated Press. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019 at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
Few people know the Obamas as well as Valerie Jarrett. She first met Michelle Obama, then a young lawyer named Michelle Robinson, in 1991, while interviewing her for a job in Chicago city government. From there, Jarrett grew to be the Obamas' most trusted personal confidante -- a relationship that went all the way to the White House. Jarrett was President Barack Obama's longest-serving senior adviser. She oversaw the offices of public engagement and intergovernmental affairs and chaired the White House Council on Women and Girls. In her memoir, Finding My Voice : My Journey to the West Wing and the Path Forward, Jarrett shares insights from the Obama White House as well as her own powerful journey. For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, we invited Jarrett to discuss that journey, from growing up in 1960s Chicago to advising the nation's first black president, with New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie.
In August 2017, hundreds of white nationalists marched in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia. They were gathered under the banner of "Unite the Right" and said they were there to protest the removal of a confederate monument. The event quickly turned violent. At least 30 counter-protesters were injured. One woman, Heather Heyer, was killed. ProPublica reporter A.C. Thompson wanted to know what really happened. His reporting took him on a year-long journey chronicling the mainstreaming of hate in America. He teamed up with producers at PBS's Frontline and the result is a pair of documentaries that chart the rise of a new, violent white supremacist group. For this episode of Crosscut Talks we invited Thompson and senior producer Sarah Childress to discuss their work and what it says about the state of hate in America today. The conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019 at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
The 2020 election is almost a year and a half away, but the race is already on. There are two dozen Democrats, and one Republican, lining up to challenge President Donald Trump. And the news cycle is dominated by big questions about who can win, and how. So Crosscut gathered a panel of pundits from the Seattle area to weigh in on the big issues, assess the candidates and speculate on Trump’s chances for a second term. Featuring conservative talk radio host Michael Medved, former chair of the Washington State Republican Party Chris Vance, political scientist Christopher Parker and Sharon Mast, who serves as the secretary of the Western States Caucus of the Democratic National Committee. This conversation was recorded on June 13, 2019 at Fremont Abbey as part of Crosscut's News & Brews series.Note: This episode contains adult language. To listen to a bleeped version, visit our episode page. 
The idea of decolonization has been with us for as long as countries have laid claim to land already rich with people and an existing history. And generally it is thought of as the giving back of that land. But there is more to decolonization than mere acreage. As Edgar Villenueva argues, "decolonizing ... is about truth and reconciliation."When it comes to philanthropy, decolonization is especially complicated. While attempting to heal communities hurt by colonization, philanthropists can actually end up doing greater harm. What is needed is a process of acknowledging the truth behind many of these philanthropic efforts and reconciling the impact of the corporate power that fuels them. For this bonus episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, editor-at-large Knute Berger speaks with Villenueva about what it will take to do just that.A nationally-recognized expert on social justice philanthropy, Villenueva grew up in North Carolina and is an enrolled member of the Lumbee Tribe. He’s also the author of Decolonizing Wealth, a book that proposes indigenous solutions to dysfunction and inequality in philanthropy and finance. Among other roles, he serves as chair of the board of directors of Native Americans in philanthropy and is a board member of the Andrus Family Fund, a national foundation that works to improve outcomes for vulnerable youth.This conversation was recorded at the KCTS 9 studios in Seattle on Nov. 19 as part of the Crosscut Talks Live series.
There are many things going wrong in the world. And a lot of the time those things seem just too big to do anything about. Especially when it comes to climate change, people often feel helpless. What it will take to make an impact is systemic change, not individual change. But Sarah Lazarovic, an illustrator, visual journalist and columnist for YES! magazine argues that small things do make a difference, and the research shows it. In her column for YES!, a nonprofit media organization focused on solutions journalism, Lazarovic illustrates the tiny shifts in our lives that can help us feel human, find inspiration and have hope. For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, we invited Lazarovic to offer her insights into some of the simple ways we can all take action. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
Big tech has a diversity problem. Some communities of color and women still represent a disproportionately small percentage of all employees at major tech companies. In 2017, for instance, African Americans made up just three percent of the workforce at Facebook, Amazon, Google and Twitter. And women represent jut a quarter of all workers in STEM fields. Changing that takes more than just asking companies to do better. It also means creating more access to education and training. For the latest episode of Crosscut Talks, we gathered a panel of industry experts and diversity advocates to talk about what that access could look like. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
There's no question that the thriving economies of wealthy west coast cities have left some residents behind. The gap between rich and poor is wider than ever. And although the market has cooled some, the cost of housing continues to rise, leaving more and more people unable to afford housing at all. So, what do we do? For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast we gathered urban leaders, including King County Executive Dow Constantine, Portland City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty, and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf. They weighed in on what's worked, and what hasn't, to address issues of affordable housing and homelessness in their cities, and to explore what solutions might still be out there.
Republicans and Democrats don't often agree. Environmental policy is no exception, especially climate policy. The response to the Green New Deal highlighted the clear divisions between the parties. Most Democratic leaders stood behind it, while most Republicans ridiculed it. The partisanship softens some when looking at the voting public. But while the gap is closing, surveys show that Democrats across the country still support action on climate change in greater numbers than Republicans do. So, is there a path forward for bipartisan environmental policy? For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, we discuss what it might take to get us there by asking leaders with environmental expertise from both parties, including former congressman and RepublicEn founder Bon Inglis, former Washington state gubernatorial candidate Bill Bryant and Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University for the Crosscut Festival.
There's no question that wildfires have been getting worse. They're bigger, stronger, and more destructive than ever before, and the fire season is longer than ever before, too. This is especially true in the western states. Last year, for instance, California experienced the deadliest wildfire in state history, killing at least 85 people, destroying fourteen thousand homes and burning an area the size of Chicago. The Pacific Northwest has escaped the height of its fire season without any major events, but there are long-term trends point toward more big fire seasons in the future. Crosscut gathered a panel of leaders — Including former Cal Fire chief Ken Pimlott, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz and the natural resources director for the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Cody Desautel — to discuss what can be done to manage this new normal. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
Grassroots activism has served a crucial role in American culture and politics throughout history. Getting out in the streets and marching in protest is still a valuable tool for the modern activist, but there are a lot of other ways activists spread the word and effect change these days, from social media campaigns to guerrilla marketing. For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, Hashtag Feminism founder Tara Conley discussed these methods with three other activists: Shout Your Abortion's Amelia Bonow, Momsrising's Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner and Earth-Feather Sovereign of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Washington. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
Artificial intelligence and other forms of automation are on the horizon for a lot of different industries. From self-driving cars to robot factory workers, AI is coming, and it could have a huge impact on jobs in this country. That, combined with global trade and the changing face of the American labor union, creates a lot of uncertainty for the future of work. What does labor look like in 21st century America? For this episode of Crosscut Talks, we invited a panel of labor leaders, scholars and disrupters to offer insights and predictions. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
The impacts of climate change are already here. From record-breaking hurricanes to fires and floods, some communities are already in crisis. People living on the coast are especially vulnerable. A number of tribal villages in Alaska and Washington state, for instance, have either already relocated or may soon need to. Millions are calling for policy solutions that will reduce emissions and prevent the most egregious effects of climate change. But in the meantime, adaptation is a must. For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, we invited climate scientist Amy Snover and a climate adaptation specialist Michael Chang to discuss this new normal and the strategies we can learn from Native communities on the front lines. This episode was recorded at the KCTS 9 studios in Seattle on Oct. 24 as part of the Crosscut Talks Live series.
The movement for LGBT rights has gained a lot of traction around the country, but there are still many places that remain unfriendly or unsafe for the queer community. Often, those places are in the more conservative parts of America. But transgender author and journalist Samantha Allen found something different when she traveled through middle America in 2017. She discovered thriving communities and havens for people of all genders and orientations. For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, we invited Allen to discuss her new book, Real Queer America: LGBT Stories from Red States, as well as her journey from Mormon missionary to openly trans woman. She is joined by David Schmader, a Seattle-based writer and performer whose work often explores queer life. The conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019 at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.Note: This episode contains adult language. To listen to a bleeped version, visit our episode page.
As the impacts of climate change become more apparent, communities along the coast are facing difficult decisions. Two of those communities, the coastal villages of Queets and Taholah, are currently developing plans to relocate. These are ancestral homes to the Quinault tribe, but they've become unsustainable, in part due to rising sea levels. Crosscut video producer Sarah Hoffman and science and environment editor Ted Alvarez have spent more than a year in the presence of the tribal members contemplating the move. The resulting documentary, The Rising, premieres this weekend on KCTS 9. The aim of the film is to present this story from the perspective of the people living it. The key, say the journalists, is to show up, get out of the way and listen. For this bonus episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, we invited Hoffman and Alvarez to talk about how they went about doing that. This conversation was recorded at the KCTS9 studios in Seattle on Oct. 24 as part of the Crosscut Talks Live series.
The life of a White House correspondent has changed dramatically in the last few years. From early-morning tweets to alternative facts to the outright vilification of the news media, President Donald Trump has upended the conventions of Washington, and that’s presented new challenges for journalists whose job it is to make sense of it all. For this episode of Crosscut Talks we listen in on a panel of correspondents and columnists who have covered the White House and have some thoughts on just how much things have changed and what it now takes to get at the truth. Featuring Associated Press reporter Darlene Superville, National Affairs columnist John Fund, and both Ashley Parker and Philip Rucker of the Washington Post. Words Matter Media founder and CEO Adam Levine moderated the conversation.Note: Technical difficulties during the recording of this episode resulted in uneven audio quality.
Authoritarian regimes around the world are having a renewed impact on American politics. The nuclear threat from North Korea, the presidential crisis in Venezuela and the ongoing conflict in Syria have all driven news cycles this year and are all products of dictatorial regimes. Then there is President Donald Trump's stance toward Russia, a country with authoritarian tendencies that has interfered in our elections and is likely to do so again. At home, meanwhile, critics of the president draw parallels between his administration and the most destructive dictatorships of the 20th century. For this episode of Crosscut Talks we invited experts on Russia, Africa and Central America to discuss all this global unrest, the Trump administration's role in it and what threats it might cause to American democracy. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
The United States incarcerates more people per capita than any other country in the world. And a vastly disproportionate number of the people we lock up are people of color. A growing bipartisan movement wants reform, but how do we transform our nation's corrections system with an eye toward justice? For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, we've invited two authors with expertise in the fields of criminal justice and racial bias to discuss the many ways our incarceration practices impact some communities more than others, and what it will take to change that system. Jennifer Eberhardt is a professor of psychology at Stanford University and the author of Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do. Emily Bazelon is a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine and the author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration. This conversation was recorded on May 4, 2019, at Seattle University as part of the Crosscut Festival.
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Podcast Details
Started
May 24th, 2019
Latest Episode
Dec 17th, 2019
Release Period
Weekly
No. of Episodes
34
Avg. Episode Length
About 1 hour
Explicit
No

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