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FinancialForce CTO talks about the future
Andrew FawcettChief Technical Officer at FinancialForce.com Enterprise Times sat down with Andy Fawcett at the FinancialForce Community Live event in Las Vegas recently.  We spoke about the importance of API’s to FinancialForce. He also spoke about the new era of Wave analytics that FinancialForce is about to bring to the market along with Einstein and Watson. With the news about ADP not quite announced the conversation only briefly touched on the new strategic alliance. To hear more about what Andy Fawcett told Enterprise Times and Wave analytics will do for FinancialForce. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download from there.    
Flint Brenton talks DevOps
Flint Brenton, CEO and President, Collabnet DevOps has become a hot topic over the last two years. The challenge for many organisations is how to implement it. There are several options but choosing the right one is not simple. Many organisations start out trying to just smooth the friction between their developers and operations teams. This might sound a good compromise but that is all it is. It is not a solution to the problem. Other organisations invest heavily in tools and processes. This comes with its own challenges. What tools are needed? Can processes be aligned or do they need to be rewritten? How long will it take to make this effective? Enterprise Times sat down with Flint Brenton, CEO, CollabNet to talk about the challenges that organisations face. He told us that this is not just about tooling. One of the big challenges is changing the culture of the organisation. Another big challenge is when to engage the security team and expand DevOps to DevOpsSec. To hear what Brenton had to say listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.
Lori Ellsworth talks prodserv economy for PSO
Community Live, London, May 17th 2017 Lori Ellsworth, GM, PSA Applications at FinancialForce.com We spoke to Lori Ellsworth at Community Live in London, the FinancialForce user conference in the UK. Lori Ellsworth spoke about how the product service economy is impacting professional services organisations.  How analytics will help professional services organisations and how professional services automation is evolving. Where are FinancialForce going with Einstein and IBM Watson. Finally the FinancialForce is looking to expand into mainland Europe, leaving Asia until later. Listen to what Lori had to say or download the podcast and listen to it on your mobile device.
John Considine talks about IBM Cloud
John Considine, general manager for cloud infrastructure, IBM Enterprise Times sat down with John Considine, General Manager, IBM Cloud to talk about cloud and what IBM’s plans are for the future. IBM has been very aggressive in building out SoftLayer since it acquired it. It has also rolled a lot of its own technology into SoftLayer and has spent the last few years turning itself into a cloud company. We were interested in what was coming next especially as the war for domination of the cloud continues to heat up. Considine was very open about IBM’s plans for the future and how it intends to support multiple architectures such as x86, Power, ARM and even the mainframe. He also explained why companies are not buying customers old data centres but instead building new ones. To hear what John Considine had to say listen to the podcast online, download it from our site or download it from Stitcher.com in order to listen to it on your mobile device.
Major Hayden talks Rackspace and cloud security
Major Hayden, Principal Architect, Rackspace During a recent visit to San Antonio, Enterprise Times was lucky enough to catch up with Major Hayden, Principal Architect, Rackspace. We were interested in what he thought about the current state of cloud security and in particular how mature customers were. It was a very interesting conversation especially when it came to the expectations of customers with previous experience of cloud and virtualisation. During the conversation Hayden talked about the challenges that customers bring with them, especially when it comes to their security. Cloud is already part of the standard developer testing environment. However, customers are not yet regularly at the point where they test deploy an application and then have their red teams attack it. Hayden believes that this is something that needs to happen as it will help harden applications and security. Another challenge is dealing with customer expectation of new technology. It is a good thing that customers are asking for new technologies that will improve their IT. The problem is that they often only have the buzzword in their head when they start the conversation. Many are not sure what the technology will deliver or how it could improve their business. One example is Kubernetes where customers want it but don’t really know what it does. As Hayden says: “You can’t rub Kubernetes on an environment like peanut butter and hope everything gets better.” To hear what Hayden had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.
Lisa Pope talks about Epicor and cloud ERP
Executive Vice President, Digital Transformation and Cloud Evangelist, Epicor At Epicor Insights, Enterprise Times caught up with Lisa Pope, Executive Vice President, Digital Transformation and Cloud Evangelist. Having moved from Infor, we were keen to find out what Pope was bringing to Epicor. One area in particular was of interest to us and that was cloud, especially given Pope’s experience of bringing cloud computing to several ERP vendors. Epicor has just 2% of its customer base on its cloud offerings despite starting this journey some time ago. Pope explained that one of the challenges was manufacturers being concerned about shared infrastructure. To address that, she pointed to the launch of Epicor’s dedicated cloud solution. There are a number of other challenges facing manufacturers that Pope highlighted. We also talked about user experience (UX) and the work Epicor is doing in that area. It is something that cloud companies need to think about if they want to attract new business. Coming from Infor, Pope has a lot of experience around UX and the benefits that it can deliver. To hear what Pope had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.  
John Durant on securing your business
As part of Enterprise Times’ recent road trip across the USA we stopped off in Minneapolis to visit Code42. We sat down and talked with John Durant, Chief Technology Office and SVP. Durant talked about the challenges organisations face when scaling up their patching processes. It is a major headache for many organisations. Recent malware and ransomware outbreaks suggest that organisations are not patching. That is wrong. They are patching but they need to do so in a way that doesn’t cause its own threat to the business. John Durant, Chief Technology Officer, Code42 Durant also talked about how enterprises manage end users and their personal technology. That technology is increasingly important to enterprises as it continues to rely on employees own devices. This is not jut about who should be patching devices, enterprise or user. It is about responsibility and taking ownership of what you bring into the organisation. Trust is a major challenge between security and users. Durant says that the default mode for security teams is to trust nobody. They treat all employees with the same level of suspicion. But is that fair? Durant thinks not. He believes that we have to get better at identifying those people who are likely to be a threat. User behavioural analytics allows security teams to identify risk. They are then able to focus their limited resources on where the threat is highest. To hear what Durant had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.  
Tatu Ylonen talks about managing SSH keys
On a recent visit to Boston in the USA, Enterprise Times spent time with Tatu Ylonen, founder of SSH and inventor of the SSH protocol. We sat and talked about the state of enterprise security, the need for encryption and the way that encryption security keys are handled. What is interesting is that the conversation came against a backdrop of politicians in several countries talking about weakening encryption. In the last few days alone, British Home Secretary, Amber Rudd has said nobody needs hard encryption. Ylonen disagrees with that view saying that “Encryption is a necessary thing. You cannot have cybersecurity on public networks without encryption.” Enterprise IT departments agree with that as, ironically, do the lawmakers. There is a constant flow of new legislation that is driving the use of every stronger encryption. This is not just about protecting data at rest but also all communications where data is being moved from one device to another. Unfortunately enterprises are not managing and changing encryption keys in the same way that they do passwords and user credentials. There is also a glaring hole in most IT security plans that aligns with government complaints. Encrypted data is hard to track and understand. The technology to decrypt and re-encrypt data at network speeds is expensive. Cybercriminals and hackers know this. They are increasingly using encryption to exfiltrate data from enterprises. This means that a lot of security teams have no way of knowing what has been stolen. The group inside the enterprise who are charged with overseeing all this are auditors. The problem is that many of them have few IT skills, lack the right tools and are not well supported by the Enterprise. Ylonen also talks about piggyback attacks and how they allow hackers full access to backup systems. To hear more about what Ylonen had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.  
Sebastian Krause talks about hybrid cloud at IBM
Sebastian Krause, General Manager, IBM Cloud Europe At IBM InterConnect in Las Vegas, Enterprise TImes had an opportunity to catch up with Sebastian Krause, General Manager, IBM Cloud Europe. Over the last two years, IBM has been moving its messaging to position Hybrid Cloud as its key cloud offering. At IBM InterConnect, it changed the definition of hybrid cloud. This, it claims, has been driven by customers. Krause explained what the change in emphasis was about and what it means for customers. While many vendors are shouting that its cloud or bust, Krause pointed out that customers have serious and very real concerns over what can and can not be placed into the cloud. We also talked about deployment strategies, micro services and what multi-cloud means. Even when enterprises decide that they do want to move to cloud there is a lot of work still to be done. To hear more about what Sebastian Krause told Enterprise Times and what hybrid means in the IBM Cloud listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download from there.
Talking cybersecurity with Dr Richard Ford
Dr Richard Ford, Chief Scientist, Forcepoint Enterprise Times recently visited Forcepoint’s HQ in Austin, Texas where we got to sit down with Chief Scientist, Dr Richard Ford and talk cybersecurity. It was an interesting conversation that looked at WannaCry and the failure of many companies to stop thinking of a physical perimeter around their network. We talked about a range of challenges that are hurting companies today and whether there is a role for HR when it comes to securing the enterprise. It was a conversation that could have gone on for hours as we explored a wide range of issues. To hear what we talked about listen to the podcast online. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download from there.
Sacha Labourey talks DevOps
Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees At the Jenkins World 2017 conference, Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees took time out to talk to Enterprise Times about some of their announcements and what was happening in DevOps. He talked about the new DevOptics release and the forthcoming Jenkins Advisor product. The goal is to deliver best practice and analytics to improve how DevOps is delivered across the enterprise. To hear more of what Labourey told Enterprise Times you can listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. You can also access our podcasts via the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher or through the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser.
Sacha Labourey on cloud, Kubernetes and Jenkins
At the DevOps World and Jenkins World conference, Enterprise Times caught up with Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees. As Jenkins has grown, CloudBees has found itself supporting both on-premises and cloud-based solutions. This is never easy. It makes it hard to have a generic code base and architecture. Labourey admits this was a challenge for Jenkins. He believes that you need to be seen by customers as being native on the platform on which you are operating. In this case, it means multiple code bases which increases the workload. A year ago CloudBees shifted to a cloud first approach. This meant that new features would be put into the cloud products first. It also shifted to Kubernetes as part of its infrastructure. This introduced the idea of Kubernetes first. The result was Jenkins X which is now shipping and successful. Enterprise Times talked with James Strachan At the CNCF conference earlier this year about Jenkins X. Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees CloudBees took the decision to wrap the core of Jenkins inside its cloud first approach. Third-party developers are still able to run their applications. It also reduces the decision making for them as to what version of Jenkins to support. Plug-ins will also work in cloud and on-premises. This is important as customers, even those who thought they wouldn’t go to cloud, are now adopting it. Labourey is seeing customers realise that cloud is more than just elastic resources. It is a destination and that means that apps have to be properly designed and architected for the platform. Customers want to migrate their applications, especially those that have been well designed, to the cloud. Kubernetes is core to the future of CloudBees. It has certified across a number of platforms in a short period of time and that will help CloudBees accelerate adoption across new customers. To hear more of what Labourey had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Jason McGee on IBM, Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes
Jason McGee is the CTO of all things Platform as a Service at IBM Cloud. Among the products he looks after is IBM’s Cloud Foundry distribution. IBM already has a range of products around Cloud Foundry including Private, Dedicated and Public. These match the way it offers its cloud services. At Cloud Foundry it introduced IBM Cloud Foundry Enterprise Edition. McGee describes it as: “An isolated and fully dedicated version of Cloud Foundry in the public cloud.” He also calls it an evolution of the exiting dedicated offering intended to appeal to a specific sector of its enterprise client base. Jason McGee, IBM Fellow, VP and CTO, IBM Cloud Platform McGee talks about it being an isolated version that allows customers to blend the best of public and private Cloud Foundry. This is about speeding up the provisioning of Cloud Foundry instances. It is fully elastic, priced by the hour and can be deployed through a self-service portal. This is what customers want when they think of cloud. McGee believes that customers will adopt it quickly although he gives no indication on the impact it may have on existing Cloud Foundry versions. A new version of Cloud Foundry was not the only thing that McGee talked about. He spoke about the Erini project with SUSE and SAP. It allows companies to plug in Kubernetes to their Cloud Foundry deployment. McGee believes that this offers efficiency and other advantages. To hear what else McGee had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Tomi Adebayo talks about protecting IP
Protecting data, especially Intellectual Property (IP) is just as important as preventing the leak of personal data. While the latter will get you big headlines, the former can cost millions if ideas and plans are stolen. For media organisations, protecting IP around advertising and product launches is critical. Leak the information about a new product early and you can find yourself no longer winning business. For bloggers and influencers such as Tomi Adebayo, aka @GadgetsBoy, protecting the product data he gets, even from publications that want him to write reviews, is essential. Getting cut off by vendors would seriously damage both his personal brand and his income. As such, he has a very specific view on what needs to be done to protect data. Tomi Adebayo aka @GadgetsBoy Importantly, what Adebayo does to protect data is something that everyone needs to think about. There are differences compared to a large organisation where data has to be shared. However, taking care about where data is stored and who it is shared with is a responsibility everyone should be dealing with. How carefully does he protect embargoes, NDAs and data? When chatting after the podcast he teased Enterprise Times about having to rush off to a launch and refusing to say what it was for. To hear what Adebayo said to us, listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
James Spiteri on why security teams need Elastic Search
At Black Hat Europe, Enterprise Times caught up with James Spiteri of Elastic. It was good timing. Elastic had just had a data breach issue. It is not alone. Over the last year there have been a number of counts where people have left their Elastic servers, often brought from third-parties, unprotected. It gave us a chance to ask Spiteri what was going on and why it was happening. James Spiteri, Solutions Architect, Cyber Security Specialist (EMEA) at Elastic The problem for Elastic is that they are open source software. If they make security too difficult to setup, customers will go elsewhere. We asked Spiteri how Elastic was dealing with this and how its partners, who are offering and reselling Elastic servers deal with it. Spiteri also told us that as a security expert, he used Elastic as part of his toolkit. This intrigued us. Elastic is, after all, a search tool. Spiteri made a great case as to why it was a better fit than many of the databases and analytics tools that people currently use. To hear what else Spiteri had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
“Don’t panic!” David Gray talks Incident Response
At some point you will be breached. Those organisations who think it will never happen to them are just an incident waiting to happen. But what happens when a breach occurs? What should you do? What processes and approaches should you have in place? These are just some of the questions that organisations should be asking themselves. At the NTT University in Berlin, David Gray, Senior Manager & Practice Lead, NTT Security talked with Enterprise Times about incident response. Perhaps the most important thing that Gray had to say was “Don’t Panic!” Panic creates mistakes in resolving an incident. It leads to hurried decisions that could cause more damage than the actual breach. David Gray, Senior Manager & Practice Lead, NTT Security As in any other crime, the first 24 hours is important. The information that the IT security team gathers is still fresh and may not be complete. Management needs to recognise that if it is going to start making public statements, they are just initial estimates. As Gray points out, many recent breaches have had to revise the size of the breach several times. Gray also talked about the planning and preparation that organisations need to put in place. One area that few do well is the practice of a breach response. This is fast becoming a requirement not just a play book that sits on the shelf until it is called into action. To hear more of what Gray had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Mark Shuttleworth talks Canonical
At the OpenStack Summit in Boston delegates have been getting updated on Managed Private Cloud as a Service (PCaaS). The OpenStack Foundation believes that this is the next big move that we will see in cloud as it delivers a solution for companies who want cloud, don’t want public cloud, but also don’t want to run a cloud themselves. This seemed like a good opportunity to sit down with Mark Shuttleworth, Founder, Canonical who owns Ubuntu. Mark Shuttleworth, Founder, Canonical Canonical has been growing its user base and products aggressively over the last few years. Back in 2014 it announced BootStack. What this means, according to Shuttleworth is: “We will, on-premises in a company’s data centre, build and operate an OpenStack for them, on their hardware, on their racks and on their network. This allows a company to consume cloud on-premises in exactly the same way developers consume cloud from public clouds.” It is not just about IT and deploying apps. Shuttleworth points out that this has a significant benefit for developers. It means that they can consume and deploy to the company network in the same way they are doing to their development space on public cloud. Part of the challenge for an enterprise with public cloud is working out what it will cost them to replicate what cloud providers offer. One of the key benefits that Shuttleworth says Managed PCaaS delivers is that Ubuntu will take responsibility for the management. It not only simplifies their environment but also takes away the cost issue. Automation is the key to for Canonical and one of the benefits it also delivers, according to Shuttleworth, is predictable costs. To hear more of what Shuttleworth said, including about their support for other platforms, listen to the podcast now. Alternatively, download the podcast and listen to it on your device of choice.
Kamal Ahluwalia talks Apttus approach and IPO
Apttus Accelerate Kamal Ahluwalia, Chief Revenue Officer, Apttus At Apttus Accelerate in San Francisco, Enterprise Times spoke to Kamal Ahluwalia, Chief Revenue Officer at Apttus. Ahluwalia spoke about how Apttus has evolved. It no longer simply delivers applications but aims to deliver outcomes. He explains a three point strategy of how the Sales teams are trained to deliver solution selling into clients. That culture has also expanded to include their channel partners. There has been criticism in the past of how Apttus brought on board channel partners that were not best of breed. Ahluwalia explains, using Hitachi as an example how that has changed recently. He also revealed how the extensive onboarding process at Apttus is now being extended out to channel partners as well. There is also the question of the Apttus IPO that seems to have been delayed, if slightly at the moment. He gives an honest view on that situation. To hear more of what Ahluwalia said, listen to the podcast now. Alternatively, download the podcast and listen to it on your device of choice.
Brian Berns explains why we need user assessment software
On a recent visit to New York, Enterprise Times caught up with Brian Berns, CEO, Knoa Software. The conversation focused on the use of user analytics as it applies to the use of enterprise software. Brian Berns, CEO, Knoa Software This is not a new topic and one that has been around for several decades. However, it is fair to say that few companies spend a lot of time trying to understand how their users are using the software they have. There are good reasons for this. Many are struggling to support existing software and meet demands for new solutions. Spending time understanding how users work with software is not a priority. Berns believes that this is a mistake. He points to the productivity gains that can be made from understanding how users are working with software. Making it easier for them to use a product means they spend less time struggling to get work done. It also has an impact on software support. If features are not being used and are no longer needed that code can be removed. This speeds up software and removes any risk with those features. More importantly there are licensing issues to be considered. If companies are paying for features and enhancements that users do not use, there are two questions. The first is why are we paying for these features? The second is why are they not being used? Costs can be lowered by getting rid of unwanted features. There is another area that is often misunderstood. When users call the help desk they often don’t have all the information the help desk teams wants. User interaction software can provide a view of what they have done, what has happened and that speeds up problem resolution. Tracking users, however, is fraught with privacy and other issues. This is something that Berns is well aware of. Interestingly Knoa’s software is resold by SAP. Given the sensitivity of the German government and workers councils it is possible to find a line between tracking users and improving how they work. This is something that companies have to learn to overcome. To hear more of what Berns told Enterprise Times you can listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. You can also access our podcasts via the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher or through the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser.
Alteryx delivers financial BI solution to Cargill
Peter Janssens, Global FP&A Director Operations & Supply Chain at Cargill Peter Janssens, Global FP&A Director Operations & Supply Chain at Cargill talks about how Alteryx has made a difference. Cargill is a global privately-owned corporation. It operates in the food, agriculture, nutrition and risk management businesses. In this podcast Janssens discusses how he introduced a strategy he calls FBI – for Finance Business Intelligence. Cargill has operations spread across the globe.  In China alone there are six plants using three different ERP solutions. Consolidation used to be challenging. To solve the challenge he used a combination of Alteryx and Tableau. Janssens summed up the opportunity saying “There is so much data within Cargill, but I want to get something out if it. To crystallise the data into value creation.” To hear what Janssens told Enterprise Times you can: obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
Fred Studer talks Marketing
Fred Studer, CMO , FinancialForce Enterprise Times caught up with Fred Studer at the FinancialForce offices in London. Studer joined FinancialForce just over six months ago. So what are the challenges he now faces? They include authenticity, brand and how inbound and outbound marketing has changed. He also revealed the tools that he uses as a modern marketer working in a cloud software company. These include Influitive, Marketo and Salesforce Einstein. He answers the question about whether FinancialForce will change its name. He spoke about the role of the CMO and how it has changed in recent years. Studer also shared his views on the art and science of modern marketing and customer advocacy. To hear more of what Studer told Enterprise Times you can listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. You can also access our podcasts via the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher or through the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser.
Making a difference in the NHS with analytics
Mridula Sori, Principal Analyst, Development Lead, NHS Improvement Mridula Sori, Principal Analyst, development lead at NHS Improvement talks about how Alteryx has helped the NHS deliver an award winning solution in the NHS. Many of the challenges faced by the NHS are similar to those in complex businesses. There are disparate data sets and an array of external factors that can determine how hospitals and surgeries should run. She talks about the challenges they face and how they are overcome. Enterprise Times spoke to Sori at Alteryx Inspire where she also presented on how NHS Improvement transformed its  enterprise analytical support with Alteryx. She also shared some of the recent work she has done around sentiment analytics. Sori is an advocate for Alteryx and spoke about the RoI that the NHS has received from implmenting the self service analytics solution. To hear what Mridula Sori told Enterprise Times you can: obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
iCabbi are growing up with Oracle platform
The world of passenger transportation is changing. ET spoke to Ian McDonald, Senior Business Analyst of iCabbi at Oracle OpenWorld. iCabbi is a software company for taxi firms that you might use but haven’t heard of. It is a fast growing startup that develops booking and dispatch software for the Taxi and Private Hire industry. From a small start they have grown to have operations in Eire, UK, USA and Canada. ET talked to Mc Donald about his experiences at OpenWorld and how they are leveraging the Oracle platform. We spoke about autonomous vehicles and how they might impact the Taxi industry. How the company has managed to scale using the Oracle platform and the benefits of working with an Oracle partner. To hear more of what Mc Donald had to say, listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there  
Aaron Higbee talks about the dangers of phishing
Aaron Higbee, CTO and co-founder at PhishMe recently flew into London to talk about their recent report on Phishing. While he was in town Enterprise Times sat down with Higbee to talk about the challenges organisations face and what they can do about the epidemic of phishing. Higbee talked about how companies need to help their staff understand the difference between real and fake emails. Part of this for PhishMe customers has been the use of the phishing simulation solution PhishMe supplies. This allows customers to create realistic phishing campaigns to test user awareness. The conversation also covered the 2017 Enterprise Phishing Resiliency and Defence Report (registration required) that PhishMe has just published. Higbee explained what triggers the phishing campaign designers were using to catch their targets. Aaron Higbee, CTO and co-founder at PhishMe To hear more of what Higbee had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
Rachel Neaman talks about diversity and cybersecurity
Earlier this year, Enterprise Times spent some time with the Corsham Institute looking at the work it was doing with retraining military veterans into cybersecurity roles. During the day, ET was able to sit down with Rachel Neaman, CEO of the Corsham Institute. During the discussion Neaman talked about the challenges of skills gaps across industry, especially cybersecurity. One of the biggest challenges is addressing those from poor social-economic backgrounds. Employers often do not come into contact with these people. They are often excluded from skilled roles because they lack formal qualifications employers want. Neaman says that they are both difficult to reach for the employer and also lack the trust in companies and education. This requires targeted outreach to connect with the right people. Rachel Neaman, CEO, Corsham Institute To hear more of what Neaman had to say about these issues listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.    
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Podcast Details
Started
Jan 1st, 1980
Latest Episode
Oct 2nd, 2019
Release Period
Daily
No. of Episodes
212
Avg. Episode Length
15 minutes
Explicit
No

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