Enterprise Times Podcast

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Flint Brenton talks DevOps
Flint Brenton, CEO and President, Collabnet DevOps has become a hot topic over the last two years. The challenge for many organisations is how to implement it. There are several options but choosing the right one is not simple. Many organisations start out trying to just smooth the friction between their developers and operations teams. This might sound a good compromise but that is all it is. It is not a solution to the problem. Other organisations invest heavily in tools and processes. This comes with its own challenges. What tools are needed? Can processes be aligned or do they need to be rewritten? How long will it take to make this effective? Enterprise Times sat down with Flint Brenton, CEO, CollabNet to talk about the challenges that organisations face. He told us that this is not just about tooling. One of the big challenges is changing the culture of the organisation. Another big challenge is when to engage the security team and expand DevOps to DevOpsSec. To hear what Brenton had to say listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.
FinancialForce CTO talks about the future
Andrew FawcettChief Technical Officer at FinancialForce.com Enterprise Times sat down with Andy Fawcett at the FinancialForce Community Live event in Las Vegas recently.  We spoke about the importance of API’s to FinancialForce. He also spoke about the new era of Wave analytics that FinancialForce is about to bring to the market along with Einstein and Watson. With the news about ADP not quite announced the conversation only briefly touched on the new strategic alliance. To hear more about what Andy Fawcett told Enterprise Times and Wave analytics will do for FinancialForce. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download from there.    
Major Hayden talks Rackspace and cloud security
Major Hayden, Principal Architect, Rackspace During a recent visit to San Antonio, Enterprise Times was lucky enough to catch up with Major Hayden, Principal Architect, Rackspace. We were interested in what he thought about the current state of cloud security and in particular how mature customers were. It was a very interesting conversation especially when it came to the expectations of customers with previous experience of cloud and virtualisation. During the conversation Hayden talked about the challenges that customers bring with them, especially when it comes to their security. Cloud is already part of the standard developer testing environment. However, customers are not yet regularly at the point where they test deploy an application and then have their red teams attack it. Hayden believes that this is something that needs to happen as it will help harden applications and security. Another challenge is dealing with customer expectation of new technology. It is a good thing that customers are asking for new technologies that will improve their IT. The problem is that they often only have the buzzword in their head when they start the conversation. Many are not sure what the technology will deliver or how it could improve their business. One example is Kubernetes where customers want it but don’t really know what it does. As Hayden says: “You can’t rub Kubernetes on an environment like peanut butter and hope everything gets better.” To hear what Hayden had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.
Lisa Pope talks about Epicor and cloud ERP
Executive Vice President, Digital Transformation and Cloud Evangelist, Epicor At Epicor Insights, Enterprise Times caught up with Lisa Pope, Executive Vice President, Digital Transformation and Cloud Evangelist. Having moved from Infor, we were keen to find out what Pope was bringing to Epicor. One area in particular was of interest to us and that was cloud, especially given Pope’s experience of bringing cloud computing to several ERP vendors. Epicor has just 2% of its customer base on its cloud offerings despite starting this journey some time ago. Pope explained that one of the challenges was manufacturers being concerned about shared infrastructure. To address that, she pointed to the launch of Epicor’s dedicated cloud solution. There are a number of other challenges facing manufacturers that Pope highlighted. We also talked about user experience (UX) and the work Epicor is doing in that area. It is something that cloud companies need to think about if they want to attract new business. Coming from Infor, Pope has a lot of experience around UX and the benefits that it can deliver. To hear what Pope had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.  
Lori Ellsworth talks prodserv economy for PSO
Community Live, London, May 17th 2017 Lori Ellsworth, GM, PSA Applications at FinancialForce.com We spoke to Lori Ellsworth at Community Live in London, the FinancialForce user conference in the UK. Lori Ellsworth spoke about how the product service economy is impacting professional services organisations.  How analytics will help professional services organisations and how professional services automation is evolving. Where are FinancialForce going with Einstein and IBM Watson. Finally the FinancialForce is looking to expand into mainland Europe, leaving Asia until later. Listen to what Lori had to say or download the podcast and listen to it on your mobile device.
John Considine talks about IBM Cloud
John Considine, general manager for cloud infrastructure, IBM Enterprise Times sat down with John Considine, General Manager, IBM Cloud to talk about cloud and what IBM’s plans are for the future. IBM has been very aggressive in building out SoftLayer since it acquired it. It has also rolled a lot of its own technology into SoftLayer and has spent the last few years turning itself into a cloud company. We were interested in what was coming next especially as the war for domination of the cloud continues to heat up. Considine was very open about IBM’s plans for the future and how it intends to support multiple architectures such as x86, Power, ARM and even the mainframe. He also explained why companies are not buying customers old data centres but instead building new ones. To hear what John Considine had to say listen to the podcast online, download it from our site or download it from Stitcher.com in order to listen to it on your mobile device.
Tatu Ylonen talks about managing SSH keys
On a recent visit to Boston in the USA, Enterprise Times spent time with Tatu Ylonen, founder of SSH and inventor of the SSH protocol. We sat and talked about the state of enterprise security, the need for encryption and the way that encryption security keys are handled. What is interesting is that the conversation came against a backdrop of politicians in several countries talking about weakening encryption. In the last few days alone, British Home Secretary, Amber Rudd has said nobody needs hard encryption. Ylonen disagrees with that view saying that “Encryption is a necessary thing. You cannot have cybersecurity on public networks without encryption.” Enterprise IT departments agree with that as, ironically, do the lawmakers. There is a constant flow of new legislation that is driving the use of every stronger encryption. This is not just about protecting data at rest but also all communications where data is being moved from one device to another. Unfortunately enterprises are not managing and changing encryption keys in the same way that they do passwords and user credentials. There is also a glaring hole in most IT security plans that aligns with government complaints. Encrypted data is hard to track and understand. The technology to decrypt and re-encrypt data at network speeds is expensive. Cybercriminals and hackers know this. They are increasingly using encryption to exfiltrate data from enterprises. This means that a lot of security teams have no way of knowing what has been stolen. The group inside the enterprise who are charged with overseeing all this are auditors. The problem is that many of them have few IT skills, lack the right tools and are not well supported by the Enterprise. Ylonen also talks about piggyback attacks and how they allow hackers full access to backup systems. To hear more about what Ylonen had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.  
John Durant on securing your business
As part of Enterprise Times’ recent road trip across the USA we stopped off in Minneapolis to visit Code42. We sat down and talked with John Durant, Chief Technology Office and SVP. Durant talked about the challenges organisations face when scaling up their patching processes. It is a major headache for many organisations. Recent malware and ransomware outbreaks suggest that organisations are not patching. That is wrong. They are patching but they need to do so in a way that doesn’t cause its own threat to the business. John Durant, Chief Technology Officer, Code42 Durant also talked about how enterprises manage end users and their personal technology. That technology is increasingly important to enterprises as it continues to rely on employees own devices. This is not jut about who should be patching devices, enterprise or user. It is about responsibility and taking ownership of what you bring into the organisation. Trust is a major challenge between security and users. Durant says that the default mode for security teams is to trust nobody. They treat all employees with the same level of suspicion. But is that fair? Durant thinks not. He believes that we have to get better at identifying those people who are likely to be a threat. User behavioural analytics allows security teams to identify risk. They are then able to focus their limited resources on where the threat is highest. To hear what Durant had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.  
Sebastian Krause talks about hybrid cloud at IBM
Sebastian Krause, General Manager, IBM Cloud Europe At IBM InterConnect in Las Vegas, Enterprise TImes had an opportunity to catch up with Sebastian Krause, General Manager, IBM Cloud Europe. Over the last two years, IBM has been moving its messaging to position Hybrid Cloud as its key cloud offering. At IBM InterConnect, it changed the definition of hybrid cloud. This, it claims, has been driven by customers. Krause explained what the change in emphasis was about and what it means for customers. While many vendors are shouting that its cloud or bust, Krause pointed out that customers have serious and very real concerns over what can and can not be placed into the cloud. We also talked about deployment strategies, micro services and what multi-cloud means. Even when enterprises decide that they do want to move to cloud there is a lot of work still to be done. To hear more about what Sebastian Krause told Enterprise Times and what hybrid means in the IBM Cloud listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download from there.
Talking cybersecurity with Dr Richard Ford
Dr Richard Ford, Chief Scientist, Forcepoint Enterprise Times recently visited Forcepoint’s HQ in Austin, Texas where we got to sit down with Chief Scientist, Dr Richard Ford and talk cybersecurity. It was an interesting conversation that looked at WannaCry and the failure of many companies to stop thinking of a physical perimeter around their network. We talked about a range of challenges that are hurting companies today and whether there is a role for HR when it comes to securing the enterprise. It was a conversation that could have gone on for hours as we explored a wide range of issues. To hear what we talked about listen to the podcast online. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download from there.
Sacha Labourey talks DevOps
Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees At the Jenkins World 2017 conference, Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees took time out to talk to Enterprise Times about some of their announcements and what was happening in DevOps. He talked about the new DevOptics release and the forthcoming Jenkins Advisor product. The goal is to deliver best practice and analytics to improve how DevOps is delivered across the enterprise. To hear more of what Labourey told Enterprise Times you can listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. You can also access our podcasts via the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher or through the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser.
Sacha Labourey on cloud, Kubernetes and Jenkins
At the DevOps World and Jenkins World conference, Enterprise Times caught up with Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees. As Jenkins has grown, CloudBees has found itself supporting both on-premises and cloud-based solutions. This is never easy. It makes it hard to have a generic code base and architecture. Labourey admits this was a challenge for Jenkins. He believes that you need to be seen by customers as being native on the platform on which you are operating. In this case, it means multiple code bases which increases the workload. A year ago CloudBees shifted to a cloud first approach. This meant that new features would be put into the cloud products first. It also shifted to Kubernetes as part of its infrastructure. This introduced the idea of Kubernetes first. The result was Jenkins X which is now shipping and successful. Enterprise Times talked with James Strachan At the CNCF conference earlier this year about Jenkins X. Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees CloudBees took the decision to wrap the core of Jenkins inside its cloud first approach. Third-party developers are still able to run their applications. It also reduces the decision making for them as to what version of Jenkins to support. Plug-ins will also work in cloud and on-premises. This is important as customers, even those who thought they wouldn’t go to cloud, are now adopting it. Labourey is seeing customers realise that cloud is more than just elastic resources. It is a destination and that means that apps have to be properly designed and architected for the platform. Customers want to migrate their applications, especially those that have been well designed, to the cloud. Kubernetes is core to the future of CloudBees. It has certified across a number of platforms in a short period of time and that will help CloudBees accelerate adoption across new customers. To hear more of what Labourey had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Jason McGee on IBM, Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes
Jason McGee is the CTO of all things Platform as a Service at IBM Cloud. Among the products he looks after is IBM’s Cloud Foundry distribution. IBM already has a range of products around Cloud Foundry including Private, Dedicated and Public. These match the way it offers its cloud services. At Cloud Foundry it introduced IBM Cloud Foundry Enterprise Edition. McGee describes it as: “An isolated and fully dedicated version of Cloud Foundry in the public cloud.” He also calls it an evolution of the exiting dedicated offering intended to appeal to a specific sector of its enterprise client base. Jason McGee, IBM Fellow, VP and CTO, IBM Cloud Platform McGee talks about it being an isolated version that allows customers to blend the best of public and private Cloud Foundry. This is about speeding up the provisioning of Cloud Foundry instances. It is fully elastic, priced by the hour and can be deployed through a self-service portal. This is what customers want when they think of cloud. McGee believes that customers will adopt it quickly although he gives no indication on the impact it may have on existing Cloud Foundry versions. A new version of Cloud Foundry was not the only thing that McGee talked about. He spoke about the Erini project with SUSE and SAP. It allows companies to plug in Kubernetes to their Cloud Foundry deployment. McGee believes that this offers efficiency and other advantages. To hear what else McGee had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Tomi Adebayo talks about protecting IP
Protecting data, especially Intellectual Property (IP) is just as important as preventing the leak of personal data. While the latter will get you big headlines, the former can cost millions if ideas and plans are stolen. For media organisations, protecting IP around advertising and product launches is critical. Leak the information about a new product early and you can find yourself no longer winning business. For bloggers and influencers such as Tomi Adebayo, aka @GadgetsBoy, protecting the product data he gets, even from publications that want him to write reviews, is essential. Getting cut off by vendors would seriously damage both his personal brand and his income. As such, he has a very specific view on what needs to be done to protect data. Tomi Adebayo aka @GadgetsBoy Importantly, what Adebayo does to protect data is something that everyone needs to think about. There are differences compared to a large organisation where data has to be shared. However, taking care about where data is stored and who it is shared with is a responsibility everyone should be dealing with. How carefully does he protect embargoes, NDAs and data? When chatting after the podcast he teased Enterprise Times about having to rush off to a launch and refusing to say what it was for. To hear what Adebayo said to us, listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
James Spiteri on why security teams need Elastic Search
At Black Hat Europe, Enterprise Times caught up with James Spiteri of Elastic. It was good timing. Elastic had just had a data breach issue. It is not alone. Over the last year there have been a number of counts where people have left their Elastic servers, often brought from third-parties, unprotected. It gave us a chance to ask Spiteri what was going on and why it was happening. James Spiteri, Solutions Architect, Cyber Security Specialist (EMEA) at Elastic The problem for Elastic is that they are open source software. If they make security too difficult to setup, customers will go elsewhere. We asked Spiteri how Elastic was dealing with this and how its partners, who are offering and reselling Elastic servers deal with it. Spiteri also told us that as a security expert, he used Elastic as part of his toolkit. This intrigued us. Elastic is, after all, a search tool. Spiteri made a great case as to why it was a better fit than many of the databases and analytics tools that people currently use. To hear what else Spiteri had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
James Strachan talks Kubernetes. CI/CD and DevOps
At the CNCF and KubeCon 18 conference Enterprise Times cornered James Strachan, Senior Architect at Cloudbees for a chat. We talked about the need to optimise CI/CD for Kubernetes. Strachan is excited about what Kubernetes brings to the DevOps process. For Strachan, Kubernetes brings a lot of excitement in how we build, test, deploy, release and promote software. Perhaps the biggest thing that Kubernetes has changed is deployment. This is because it enables people to standardise how they do it. Instead of a myriad of software routines and deployment tools, Kubernetes makes life simple. For cloud vendors, it means that they can automate everything. James Strachan, Senior Architect at Cloudbees Strachan talked about the latest work going on at Jenkins, Jenkins X. This is a project that anyone attending Jenkins World will hear much more about in September. Jenkins X gives every team their own development and staging areas that allow people to promote when they want. The goal is to get people to do tiny changes and get those into production as quick as possible. Strachan believes that if we get the size of changes down we not only get faster but it is far easier to reverse a change if there are problems. To hear what else Strachan had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
Liz Rice and Sugu Sougoumarane talk security and databases
Enterprise Times caught up with Liz Rice, Technology Evangelist, Aqua Security and Sugu Sougoumarane, CTO, PlanetScale Data at the Cloud Native Computing Conference and KubeCon in Copenhagen. We talked about Vitess, the open source database clustering system which is now a CNCF project. At the same time we talked about the challenge of container security, a subject that was popular among many conference attendees. Vitess started out as a project to improve the performance of YouTube. Early on, Google required Vitess to be moved into Google Cloud which meant porting the entire project. Although it was ported it was also kept as an open source project. Sugu Sougoumarane, CTO, PlanetScale Data Porting applications across platforms has never been easy. As companies struggle with multi-cloud and free movement of apps, how difficult was the move? Sugu said it was: “quite a challenge because the Google ecosystem is very different. It has a lot of custom APIs that are only internal to Google.” It forced the Vitess team to build a large number of adapters. Data is the biggest challenge for companies moving to cloud. People have been scared to move data into the cloud due to the ephemeral nature of the cloud and because cloud APIs are not good at managing the movement of data. There are other concerns with APIs. Many organisations are struggling to know how to review, curate, clean-up and publish APIs that are safe and secure. Rice agrees that there have been problems. Despite this there is work being done to make it easier to secure APIs. Liz Rice, Technology Evangelist, Aqua Security Rice is particularly excited by runtime protection within the container world. Microservices, in particular, should be accessing limited services and APIs. If, Rice says, you can learn what those behaviours are like you can spot unusual behaviours. This is about hardening the security of container networks and is something that security teams need to get involved in. The conversation looked at several other issue with databases in containers and the work being done to secure containers. Rice also talked about other projects taking place inside the CNCF. Many of these are security related and for those who are worried about containers and security, Rice talks a lot about the solutions that are coming along. To hear what else Liz and Sugu had to say, listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
Aparna Sinha talks Kubernetes 
At the Cloud Native Computing Conference and KubeCon 18 in Copenhagen, Enterprise Times was fortunate to catch Aparna Sinha, Product Management Lead for Kubernetes at Google. It’s a very busy time for Kubernetes. It has just graduated from the CNCF and is now a fully fledged project in its own right. It has also seen substantial enterprise take-up with claims that over 50% of enterprises are using Kubernetes in one form or another. There were a number of announcements at the show that Sinha was keen to elaborate on. The first is stack driver monitoring for Kubernetes which allows the user to monitor more Kubernetes components. There is also an API connector for the open source Prometheus project. This will allow administrators to pull metrics from Prometheus and consume them in Google Kubernetes Environment (GKE). As well a providing a single pane of glass for all Kubernetes metrics, this also enables users to auto-scale their environment based on what is happening in the application. Aparna Sinha, Product Management Lead for Kubernetes at Google The other announcements will appeal to IT security teams. Google has focused on two areas to improve security. The first is runtime security so that you can see what is going on in your cluster. Google Cloud Security Command Centre (GCSCC) now has first class support for containers. Google is also bringing five partners into its GCSCC. The integration means that any alerts from the partners will show up in GCSCC making it easier for Kubernetes customers to deal with the problem. The third major announcement that Sinha talked about was gVisor. This is a container security solution that Google uses internally and which it has now open sourced . One of the presentations at the show, ‘Running With Scissors’ by Liz Rice, Aqua Security, showed up some of the security challenges with containers. This is something that gVisor is designed to address. To hear what else Sinha had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
Orli Gan talks AI, threat detection and cyber security
Earlier this year, Enterprise Times talked with Orli Gan, Head of Products for Threat Detection at Checkpoint. Gan had just given a keynote where she told the audience that AI was not a silver bullet for cyber security. It’s an interesting view that is aimed at resetting expectations of what the technology is able to deliver today. Orli believes that the challenge is the immaturity of the technology. The current generations of algorithms have deficiencies and flaws that mean today, they are not as accurate as we need them to be. One of the problems of using AI effectively is the size and accuracy of the underlying data. AI needs training and that requires access to a very large amount of data. Orli Gan, Head of Threat Prevention Products, Check Point Software Importantly, that data must be relevant to the space that the AI is trying to solve. Gan says that customers will provide access to the malicious data that they have. What they won’t provide is access to normal or benign data. Without that it is difficult to know exactly what to look for and to detect the right patterns in the data. This is not just about a single company. An effective system needs to have malicious and normal data from a lot of companies to establish where the lines are. Sharing data also relies in regulators and lawmakers allowing it. This is urgent. Gan says that the threat today is huge and will only get bigger in future years. Another challenge will be that as AI gets to be more effective, it will be the target of the next wave of cyber attacks. To hear what else Gan had to say, listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
Jorge Ferrer on open source, community vs enterprise and UX
Vice President of Engineering at Liferay, Jorge Ferrer, talks to Enterprise Times about managing open source relationships and UX. Many companies are looking at the benefits of open source but struggle to know how best to approach it. At many conferences, the message seems to be that open source is free. But that’s not the case. Access to the code might be free but there are challenges in taking that software into the enterprise. For example, does the enterprise allow developers to grab any code they want from repositories and incorporate it into enterprise software? If so, how secure is it? Should they choose a curated open source solution and take that on board? There are also skills questions to be dealt with. Do we know the language? Do we have enough skills to integrate this into our existing code base? Will we have to recruit or retrain our existing developers and at what cost? Ferrer talks openly about how Liferay operates with both the open source community and enterprise customers. For example, when you make a mistake, be open, be honest about it. It ensures that there are no big secrets between vendor and the developer community. You also need to look at each mistake, understand how it happened and show how you have fixed it. Security is also a challenge. Open source often talks about the benefits of having more eyes on code. It’s a good case. The more people who review code the better it should be. However, there are no guarantees of code security even within the open source community. For vendors who are looking to curate open source and create a commercial offering, working with the community can be difficult. Contributors want to know that they are recognised and even rewarded. Some projects actively recruit from their developer community. This is a quick way to ensure that everyone is engaged in projects. To hear what else Ferrer had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
How SNIA is using Open Source to speed up storage standards
Developing a storage standard has always been a long, arduous and contentious process. It is the same for most standards. However, with the speed that technology is changing, that approach is no longer sustainable, and not just for storage. To understand what change means for the storage industry, Enterprise Times talked with Richelle Ahlvers. Ahlvers is a board member at the Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA). She is also the Chair of the Scalable Storage Management Technical Workgroup. That workgroup is responsible for the Swordfish Storage Management API. Already providing support for block and file storage, it will release support for object storage soon. Richelle Alvers, Chair of the Scalable Storage Management Technical Workgroup, SNIA To speed up storage standards, Ahlvers says that the SNIA is: “Trying to engage a lot of Open Source and come up with a much more agile and iterative delivery models for standards.” Ahlvers used the development of Swordfish as an example saying: “It is an extension of Red Fish from the DMTF and SNIA adopted a similar model. There is no new protocol and it took just 9 months to come up with the first release. Now it is refreshed every 3-4 months with significant engagement with the wiser community.” Another example that Ahlvers gave is the SNIA work on the CDMI (Cloud Data Management Interface). That spec is now entirely in Open Source. All the bug fixes and changes are done through the Open Source community which, Ahlvers says, makes it faster. To hear what else Ahlvers had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Cyber security gulf grows between business and IT
NTT Security has released its fifth annual Risk:Value report. The report focused on people outside of the IT function in order to understand how the business viewed cyber security. The results should send a sharp message to the C-Suite. While the IT function believes it has control over the problem, the business is far less convinced. In fact, the business believes that progress has come to a complete stop. There are particular issues over security, incident response and compliance. In the case of the latter, only 30% of business users believe that GDPR applies to them. This is a surprise given that 80% believe that compliance, despite its impact on the business, is important. One of the problems is that businesses are taking on solutions that tick the compliance box. The problem with this is that those solutions are not integrated and do not really promote compliance at all. To get a better understanding of the report, Enterprise Times went to Frankfurt to talk to Kai Grunwitz, Senior Vice President, EMEA, NTT Security about the results. We talked through the issues above and, importantly, where companies should start when reading the Risk:Value 2019 report. To hear what Grunwitz had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Monty Taylor explains what OpenDev is about
The OpenStack Foundation (OSF) has decided to make its own development tools available to a wider range of developers. These are all open source tools that have been used to build OpenStack and other projects. To date, they have only really been used by those close to OpenStack. The goal now is to widen the usage of, and participation in, these tools which are available through the OpenDev website. The news has only just been announced and the first cut of the website is fairly limited. To get an understanding of exactly what is in OpenDev, Enterprise Times talked to Monty Taylor. Taylor has been involved with OpenStack from inception to now and has been part of the team who has delivered these developer tools for over nine years. Monty Taylor Taylor told ET that this is not just about tools. Services and code repositories are now going to be more easily available. Developers will be able to use things such as the code publishing and code review tools. They will also get access to all the code repositories that the OSF has been hosting which is far more than just OpenStack. The primary focus is not to deliver this as a Platform as a Service. It is to give easy access to code, services and tools. What is a possibility is that the various OpenStack distributions might themselves take these tools and offer access through their own platforms. This would enable them to widen their own developer ecosystem. To hear more of what Taylor had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Kerim Akgonul talks about the new Pega Low Code Factory
Recorded at PegaWorld this week, Kerim Akgonul, Senior Vice President, Products at Pega talks about the new Pega Low Code Factory. He reveals the three elements of the solution which are education, guidelines and tools. The Low Code factory delivers the ability for organisations to enable their employees to create applications than automate processes across an organisation. Akgonul argues that the Low Code Factory mitigates the risk of app proliferation that low code can produce in an organisation. He makes it clear that it does not replace the IT organisations. It is now able to control the integration components and data models that it already understands. He also reveals how Pega will deliver a new UI layer that will enable individuals to personalise the apps without having to redevelop them. Pega has also considered what happens during a system upgrade. The system will update the applications, and warns users of changes that impact their applications. He talks about some of the benefits that early adopters are already seeing from the solution. To hear more of what Akgonul had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there  
Kai Waehner explains why you need Kafka
The Apache Kafka summit was held in London last week. Kafka was originally designed to solve the problem of high volume and throughput at LinkedIn. This means that it is capable of scaling and dealing with asynchronous and message-driven environments. Enterprise Times went along and caught up with Kai Waehner, Technology Evangelist, Confluent. Waehner talked about Kafka, what customers are doing and walked through a number of case studies. Being based in Germany, Waehner deals with a lot of manufacturing companies who have very specific IoT challenges. This is an area where Kafka is beginning to achieve significant traction. One of the reasons for that is the way that Kafka handles IoT data. Many IoT analytics solutions struggle to manage the volume of data and customers end up with large database full of data they never use. Waehner explains why Kafka is a better bet for streaming the data to the analytics solution. One of the latest talking points around analytics is edge processing. Companies are focused on separating signal from noise using any device they can. Waehner points out that before people start they need to think about what the edge really is. He makes the point that while it could be a car, for real-time analytics it is better to think of smaller data centres or clusters. In a hospital, for example, you might deploy a single Kafka cluster but this could then feed aggregated health data at a regional level. Another solution is to build models in the data centre and then deploy them much further out. To hear more of what Waehner had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
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Podcast Details
Started
Jan 1st, 1980
Latest Episode
Jan 8th, 2020
Release Period
Daily
No. of Episodes
241
Avg. Episode Length
16 minutes
Explicit
No

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