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Major Hayden, Principal Architect, Rackspace During a recent visit to San Antonio, Enterprise Times was lucky enough to catch up with Major Hayden, Principal Architect, Rackspace. We were interested in what he thought about the current state of cloud security and in particular how mature customers were. It was a very interesting conversation especially when it came to the expectations of customers with previous experience of cloud and virtualisation. During the conversation Hayden talked about the challenges that customers bring with them, especially when it comes to their security. Cloud is already part of the standard developer testing environment. However, customers are not yet regularly at the point where they test deploy an application and then have their red teams attack it. Hayden believes that this is something that needs to happen as it will help harden applications and security. Another challenge is dealing with customer expectation of new technology. It is a good thing that customers are asking for new technologies that will improve their IT. The problem is that they often only have the buzzword in their head when they start the conversation. Many are not sure what the technology will deliver or how it could improve their business. One example is Kubernetes where customers want it but don’t really know what it does. As Hayden says: “You can’t rub Kubernetes on an environment like peanut butter and hope everything gets better.” To hear what Hayden had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.
Andrew FawcettChief Technical Officer at FinancialForce.com Enterprise Times sat down with Andy Fawcett at the FinancialForce Community Live event in Las Vegas recently.  We spoke about the importance of API’s to FinancialForce. He also spoke about the new era of Wave analytics that FinancialForce is about to bring to the market along with Einstein and Watson. With the news about ADP not quite announced the conversation only briefly touched on the new strategic alliance. To hear more about what Andy Fawcett told Enterprise Times and Wave analytics will do for FinancialForce. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download from there.    
Community Live, London, May 17th 2017 Lori Ellsworth, GM, PSA Applications at FinancialForce.com We spoke to Lori Ellsworth at Community Live in London, the FinancialForce user conference in the UK. Lori Ellsworth spoke about how the product service economy is impacting professional services organisations.  How analytics will help professional services organisations and how professional services automation is evolving. Where are FinancialForce going with Einstein and IBM Watson. Finally the FinancialForce is looking to expand into mainland Europe, leaving Asia until later. Listen to what Lori had to say or download the podcast and listen to it on your mobile device.
Flint Brenton, CEO and President, Collabnet DevOps has become a hot topic over the last two years. The challenge for many organisations is how to implement it. There are several options but choosing the right one is not simple. Many organisations start out trying to just smooth the friction between their developers and operations teams. This might sound a good compromise but that is all it is. It is not a solution to the problem. Other organisations invest heavily in tools and processes. This comes with its own challenges. What tools are needed? Can processes be aligned or do they need to be rewritten? How long will it take to make this effective? Enterprise Times sat down with Flint Brenton, CEO, CollabNet to talk about the challenges that organisations face. He told us that this is not just about tooling. One of the big challenges is changing the culture of the organisation. Another big challenge is when to engage the security team and expand DevOps to DevOpsSec. To hear what Brenton had to say listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.
Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees At the Jenkins World 2017 conference, Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees took time out to talk to Enterprise Times about some of their announcements and what was happening in DevOps. He talked about the new DevOptics release and the forthcoming Jenkins Advisor product. The goal is to deliver best practice and analytics to improve how DevOps is delivered across the enterprise. To hear more of what Labourey told Enterprise Times you can listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. You can also access our podcasts via the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher or through the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser.
John Considine, general manager for cloud infrastructure, IBM Enterprise Times sat down with John Considine, General Manager, IBM Cloud to talk about cloud and what IBM’s plans are for the future. IBM has been very aggressive in building out SoftLayer since it acquired it. It has also rolled a lot of its own technology into SoftLayer and has spent the last few years turning itself into a cloud company. We were interested in what was coming next especially as the war for domination of the cloud continues to heat up. Considine was very open about IBM’s plans for the future and how it intends to support multiple architectures such as x86, Power, ARM and even the mainframe. He also explained why companies are not buying customers old data centres but instead building new ones. To hear what John Considine had to say listen to the podcast online, download it from our site or download it from Stitcher.com in order to listen to it on your mobile device.
Sebastian Krause, General Manager, IBM Cloud Europe At IBM InterConnect in Las Vegas, Enterprise TImes had an opportunity to catch up with Sebastian Krause, General Manager, IBM Cloud Europe. Over the last two years, IBM has been moving its messaging to position Hybrid Cloud as its key cloud offering. At IBM InterConnect, it changed the definition of hybrid cloud. This, it claims, has been driven by customers. Krause explained what the change in emphasis was about and what it means for customers. While many vendors are shouting that its cloud or bust, Krause pointed out that customers have serious and very real concerns over what can and can not be placed into the cloud. We also talked about deployment strategies, micro services and what multi-cloud means. Even when enterprises decide that they do want to move to cloud there is a lot of work still to be done. To hear more about what Sebastian Krause told Enterprise Times and what hybrid means in the IBM Cloud listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download from there.
On a recent visit to Boston in the USA, Enterprise Times spent time with Tatu Ylonen, founder of SSH and inventor of the SSH protocol. We sat and talked about the state of enterprise security, the need for encryption and the way that encryption security keys are handled. What is interesting is that the conversation came against a backdrop of politicians in several countries talking about weakening encryption. In the last few days alone, British Home Secretary, Amber Rudd has said nobody needs hard encryption. Ylonen disagrees with that view saying that “Encryption is a necessary thing. You cannot have cybersecurity on public networks without encryption.” Enterprise IT departments agree with that as, ironically, do the lawmakers. There is a constant flow of new legislation that is driving the use of every stronger encryption. This is not just about protecting data at rest but also all communications where data is being moved from one device to another. Unfortunately enterprises are not managing and changing encryption keys in the same way that they do passwords and user credentials. There is also a glaring hole in most IT security plans that aligns with government complaints. Encrypted data is hard to track and understand. The technology to decrypt and re-encrypt data at network speeds is expensive. Cybercriminals and hackers know this. They are increasingly using encryption to exfiltrate data from enterprises. This means that a lot of security teams have no way of knowing what has been stolen. The group inside the enterprise who are charged with overseeing all this are auditors. The problem is that many of them have few IT skills, lack the right tools and are not well supported by the Enterprise. Ylonen also talks about piggyback attacks and how they allow hackers full access to backup systems. To hear more about what Ylonen had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.  
Dr Richard Ford, Chief Scientist, Forcepoint Enterprise Times recently visited Forcepoint’s HQ in Austin, Texas where we got to sit down with Chief Scientist, Dr Richard Ford and talk cybersecurity. It was an interesting conversation that looked at WannaCry and the failure of many companies to stop thinking of a physical perimeter around their network. We talked about a range of challenges that are hurting companies today and whether there is a role for HR when it comes to securing the enterprise. It was a conversation that could have gone on for hours as we explored a wide range of issues. To hear what we talked about listen to the podcast online. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download from there.
As part of Enterprise Times’ recent road trip across the USA we stopped off in Minneapolis to visit Code42. We sat down and talked with John Durant, Chief Technology Office and SVP. Durant talked about the challenges organisations face when scaling up their patching processes. It is a major headache for many organisations. Recent malware and ransomware outbreaks suggest that organisations are not patching. That is wrong. They are patching but they need to do so in a way that doesn’t cause its own threat to the business. John Durant, Chief Technology Officer, Code42 Durant also talked about how enterprises manage end users and their personal technology. That technology is increasingly important to enterprises as it continues to rely on employees own devices. This is not jut about who should be patching devices, enterprise or user. It is about responsibility and taking ownership of what you bring into the organisation. Trust is a major challenge between security and users. Durant says that the default mode for security teams is to trust nobody. They treat all employees with the same level of suspicion. But is that fair? Durant thinks not. He believes that we have to get better at identifying those people who are likely to be a threat. User behavioural analytics allows security teams to identify risk. They are then able to focus their limited resources on where the threat is highest. To hear what Durant had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.  
Executive Vice President, Digital Transformation and Cloud Evangelist, Epicor At Epicor Insights, Enterprise Times caught up with Lisa Pope, Executive Vice President, Digital Transformation and Cloud Evangelist. Having moved from Infor, we were keen to find out what Pope was bringing to Epicor. One area in particular was of interest to us and that was cloud, especially given Pope’s experience of bringing cloud computing to several ERP vendors. Epicor has just 2% of its customer base on its cloud offerings despite starting this journey some time ago. Pope explained that one of the challenges was manufacturers being concerned about shared infrastructure. To address that, she pointed to the launch of Epicor’s dedicated cloud solution. There are a number of other challenges facing manufacturers that Pope highlighted. We also talked about user experience (UX) and the work Epicor is doing in that area. It is something that cloud companies need to think about if they want to attract new business. Coming from Infor, Pope has a lot of experience around UX and the benefits that it can deliver. To hear what Pope had to say, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively you can download it to your local machine and listen to it on your personal device. Our podcasts are also available for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts. Alternatively go to our page on Stitcher and download this podcast from there.  
On a recent visit to London, Mike McKee, CEO of insider threat management company ObserveIT, dropped in to talk to Enterprise Times. We took the opportunity to ask McKee what the term really means. Who is that insider? A rogue employee? A partner? The cleaner? McKee said it encompasses any employee including contractors. A lot of organisations would not see a contractor as being a rogue employee as they are often invisible to many inside the company. Partners with access to systems are the same and as we increase the use of collaboration tools, their access to sensitive data is getting deeper. One of the things McKee was keen to point out is that most of the time people are good people. The general assumption is that an insider incident has to be malicious. That is untrue. Everyone makes mistakes whether than be through a lack of training, knowledge or inattention. McKee gave the example of using the wrong app. For example sharing information with a partner via Dropbox only to discover that the company uses Box. Most employees will make that mistake which is exacerbated as BYOD and personal cloud spreads through the company. McKee says that we need to do more to track the data in order to protect it. However, IT often no longer has a clue where the company data is. It is spread across company owned assets, cloud, personal devices and removable media. If we cannot see it then we surely cannot protect it. The only way to solve this problem is greater visibility over activity across devices and data. We need to identify the sensitive data and track how it is used. The key to this is not just getting large volumes of alerts but usable alerts with context. This requires an understanding of the data, what people are doing and how it is being used. This is far more than behavioural analytics. It goes much deeper than that. To hear more of what Barnes had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Peter Janssens, Global FP&A Director Operations & Supply Chain at Cargill Peter Janssens, Global FP&A Director Operations & Supply Chain at Cargill talks about how Alteryx has made a difference. Cargill is a global privately-owned corporation. It operates in the food, agriculture, nutrition and risk management businesses. In this podcast Janssens discusses how he introduced a strategy he calls FBI – for Finance Business Intelligence. Cargill has operations spread across the globe.  In China alone there are six plants using three different ERP solutions. Consolidation used to be challenging. To solve the challenge he used a combination of Alteryx and Tableau. Janssens summed up the opportunity saying “There is so much data within Cargill, but I want to get something out if it. To crystallise the data into value creation.” To hear what Janssens told Enterprise Times you can: obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
At some point you will be breached. Those organisations who think it will never happen to them are just an incident waiting to happen. But what happens when a breach occurs? What should you do? What processes and approaches should you have in place? These are just some of the questions that organisations should be asking themselves. At the NTT University in Berlin, David Gray, Senior Manager & Practice Lead, NTT Security talked with Enterprise Times about incident response. Perhaps the most important thing that Gray had to say was “Don’t Panic!” Panic creates mistakes in resolving an incident. It leads to hurried decisions that could cause more damage than the actual breach. David Gray, Senior Manager & Practice Lead, NTT Security As in any other crime, the first 24 hours is important. The information that the IT security team gathers is still fresh and may not be complete. Management needs to recognise that if it is going to start making public statements, they are just initial estimates. As Gray points out, many recent breaches have had to revise the size of the breach several times. Gray also talked about the planning and preparation that organisations need to put in place. One area that few do well is the practice of a breach response. This is fast becoming a requirement not just a play book that sits on the shelf until it is called into action. To hear more of what Gray had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Dave Van Everen, Senior Vice President of Product Marketing, Mirantis talked to Enterprise Times at the Open Infrastructure conference about their latest announcements. One challenge that organisations face is how to get their cloud environments right. Before speaking to ET, Van Everen had just announced the Model Designer for Mirantis Cloud Platform at Open Infrastructure. In this podcast, he talks more about the Model Designer and what customers can expect. In effect, this is Infrastructure as Code (IaC). It allows customers to look at their own needs and use cases, to build their cloud model. Importantly, it allows them to do all of this before they start with their cloud environment. According to Van Everen: “What makes this unique is the way we have designed the wizard to allow them to control the experience” Dave van Everen, Senior Vice President at Mirantis Customers are able to either use defaults or add their own parameters. Where the customer is looking at separate cloud environment for different applications, this should save significant time. It also plays well to customers who have specific cloud-based workloads such as HPC, AI or ML. It will allow them to create cloud deployment boilerplates and compare different clouds when they are looking at where to place those applications and workloads. There is a caveat to that. While the idea of moving apps to the “best fit” cloud sounds good, it does require a lot of planning and acceptance that all clouds are not equal. This is where Mirantis believes it has a jump start on competitors. It has a large managed service provider (MSP) market. Those MSP could add services around the Model Designer to enable customers to get on the platform quickly. One way would be to create standard workload models, such as HPC and AI, and then help customers to tune for their specific needs. To hear more of what Van Everen had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
At Cyber Security Connect in Monaco, Enterprise Times caught up with Matt Lock, UK Technical Director at Varonis. In this short podcast he talks about the problems of excess data, the need for context, machine intelligence, data sensitivity and behavioural analytics. One of the challenges that security teams face is the amount of data that they gather. They are overwhelmed by the quantity of it. Lock believes that the only way they can begin to be productive is to have context around the data. Matt Lock, UK Technical Director at Varonis The systems that organisations use also need better intelligence. This allows them to identify sensitive data and the data points that relate to it. This can help build a framework for governance. Even here, context is a critical factor. Controlling access is also a major challenge. Organisations talk about privileged access management but ignore the issue of permissions. It is a rare organisation that regularly reviews and removes excess access permissions from staff. This is not just a problem of too much access. How do you decide if a user really should be accessing those files if you’ve given them permission to everything? To hear what else Lock had to say listen to the podcast Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
At the launch of NTT Security’s Global Threat Intelligence Report (GTIR) 2019, Rob Kraus, Sr. Director, Global Threat Intelligence Center Operations, NTT Security talked to Enterprise Times about the findings. Every large security vendor delivers their own GTIR and the problem for CISO’s and security teams is understanding what they really say. One of the challenges for any threat assessment process is having enough data. This is not just about volume but also diversity of data from different geolocations and devices. Kraus told ET that NTT Security is able to draw on the Internet traffic that flows through NTT Communications. This comprises a staggering 40% of global traffic. It makes for a very effective data pool. Rob Kraus, Sr. Director, Global Threat Intelligence Center Operations, NTT Security Kraus also talks about the industries that are affected the most. Financial and healthcare are both targets as they have highly accurate data. Both are being targeted through a wide variety of attacks. However, web applications are becoming the biggest threat. For the financial institutions, especially banks, this is a major problem. They are all scrambling to address a new customer base that wants access to banking via their mobile devices. If the apps are not secure, then customers are at risk. One of the most interesting parts of this podcast is the discussion around reconnaissance. It is often overlooked as just noise. However, as Kraus points out, the absence of reconnaissance should set off warning bells. It often means an attack is imminent rather than attackers have lost interest. To hear more of what Kraus had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterpr
At Infor’s Inforum conference in Washington, DC, Infor launched its Coleman Digital Assistant. It is the first of the Coleman AI family products that the company is planning. Enterprise Times sat down with Massimo Capoccia, SVP Infor OS, Technology, Infor to talk about Coleman and other technologies that Infor is planning to bring to market. Unlike many of its competitors, Infor has developed Coleman completely in-house. This is a brave move. AI is a technology that is developing rapidly and has a high cost to get into. It also requires a lot of highly skilled staff to develop an AI engine on which to build products. By going it alone, Infor is sending the message to the market that it is a major player. Massimo Capoccia, SVP Infor OS, Technology, Infor The Coleman Digital Assistant is just the first of several products Infor is planning in this space. It is designed to work through the Infor apps on desktop, cloud and mobile. Capoccia also told us that the company plans to take advantage of Amazon Alexa. It will allow businesses to buy their own Alexa devices and use them with the Coleman tools. Eventually, the plan is to make it deployable on personal Alexa devices but that requires some work on authentication and data protection. To hear more of what Capoccia had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Yandex, the Russian online giant, created ClickHouse to solve its problem around web analytics. Like many web companies, Yandex was struggling to understand user behaviour. For example, why did people put stuff in their baskets but not complete the transaction? Yandex open-sourced ClickHouse in 2016 under the Apache licence. Since then, it has found a new market in the analytics world with people who have exceptionally large datasets. To understand more about ClickHouse, Enterprise Times talked with Robert Hodges, CEO of Altinity. Alexander Zaitsev, CTO, formed Altinity in 2017 to provide support for ClickHouse. It has since become the number two committer behind Yandex. Robert Hodges, CEO of Altinity What makes ClickHouse interesting is that it uses a columnar DBMS. What does that mean? It means it is capable of ingesting ultra-large data sets very quickly. Columnar databases are highly scalable because they simply add new data by creating a new column, not adding rows. Having large amounts of data is of little interest if it cannot be processed quickly. Hodges said: “We are MPP [Massively Parallel Processing] enabled. We’re able to spread queries over many nodes. We use vectorised query with really, really great compression and codecs for reducing uncompressed code size.” Those codecs also make ClickHouse attractive. One of the challenges with petabyte data sets is how it uses resources and its speed of processing. Hodges talks about both of these. He also addresses the challenge of building a company around an open-source solution. To hear more of what Hodges had to say, listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
Shortly before his move from OutSystems to VMware earlier this year, Enterprise Times talked to Dan Juengst about Low Code environments. We asked Juengst what low code was all about. He said it is: “A cloud application environment that allows you to build, run and scale them in a scalable elastic environment. The key is the way you develop the applications. “You use a visual modelling interface. Developers work in an IDE that allows them to visually model the application, they essentially drag and drop components of the application, connect them together, press the button and automation technology writes the code for the application and stitches it all together.” This is all about speeding up the development process. As business units demand more apps, faster, IT is struggling to respond. The problem is that are not enough programmers or testers to design, develop and ensure apps are safe. Low code is just the latest promise to deliver code faster, at scale and more simply. Juengst believes that over 20 years of history are on the vendors side. They have seen the previous failures and problems and now have products that can deliver. One benefit of having spent so long trying to solve this is that other technologies have appeared to make it easier. DevOps for automation and testing as well as moving it to production are an example. Juengst see Low code as benefitting from the changes that we are seeing across IT. To hear what else Juengst had to say, listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Enterprise Times talked with Patrick Johnston of Savvius about improving network performance. After 25 years of focusing on enterprise networks it is now looking at cloud computing and branch networks. The rise of SD-WAN technologies and VLANs is being used by companies to improve network performance. They allow network teams to shape traffic to improve traffic management and delivery. With cloud computing, use of mobile networks and branch offices, the traffic flows over multiple networks. This is where Johnston believes Savvius has an advantage as customers look for multi-segment traffic analysis tools. Patrick Johnston, Vice President Worldwide Sales, Savvius One of the big challenges for companies is understanding where their network degradation occurs. Johnston says that Savvius has shown the virtual networks in the cloud are a major cause of performance issues. This is something that many cloud providers will want to look at. SD-WAN use is also growing in the branch office environment. This increases the pressure on networks teams to understand how to manage it. Moving data into the cloud has become a sticky issue for some companies. Concerns over privacy, data protection and laws require data to stay in country have grown. Interestingly, as the size of company decreases Johnston sees an increasing willingness to move data to the public cloud. Movement to public cloud is also industry dependent. To hear more of what Patrick Johnson had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there.
Jonathan Bryce, Executive Director, OpenStack Foundation At the OpenStack Summit in Boston, Jonathan Bryce, Executive Director of the OpenStack Foundation talked about the need to simplify OpenStack. This became the main theme of the conference for many people. Enterprise Times was fortunate enough to get some time with Bryce to talk about what this really means and OpenStack’s relationship with the Open Source community. Part of the challenge for OpenStack is that after seven years it is now seen as a mature technology. With that comes a number of issues in terms of management, skills and legacy. People need to migrate from older versions and want the software projects they are using to stay supported. Bryce accepts that there are challenges and talked about how OpenStack was beginning to deal with them. To find out how Bryce sees OpenStack dealing with its issues and increasing user satisfaction again, listen to the podcast here. Alternatively, you can download the podcast and listen to it on your desktop, laptop or mobile device.
At the DevOps World and Jenkins World conference, Enterprise Times caught up with Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees. As Jenkins has grown, CloudBees has found itself supporting both on-premises and cloud-based solutions. This is never easy. It makes it hard to have a generic code base and architecture. Labourey admits this was a challenge for Jenkins. He believes that you need to be seen by customers as being native on the platform on which you are operating. In this case, it means multiple code bases which increases the workload. A year ago CloudBees shifted to a cloud first approach. This meant that new features would be put into the cloud products first. It also shifted to Kubernetes as part of its infrastructure. This introduced the idea of Kubernetes first. The result was Jenkins X which is now shipping and successful. Enterprise Times talked with James Strachan At the CNCF conference earlier this year about Jenkins X. Sacha Labourey, CEO, CloudBees CloudBees took the decision to wrap the core of Jenkins inside its cloud first approach. Third-party developers are still able to run their applications. It also reduces the decision making for them as to what version of Jenkins to support. Plug-ins will also work in cloud and on-premises. This is important as customers, even those who thought they wouldn’t go to cloud, are now adopting it. Labourey is seeing customers realise that cloud is more than just elastic resources. It is a destination and that means that apps have to be properly designed and architected for the platform. Customers want to migrate their applications, especially those that have been well designed, to the cloud. Kubernetes is core to the future of CloudBees. It has certified across a number of platforms in a short period of time and that will help CloudBees accelerate adoption across new customers. To hear more of what Labourey had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
Alongside Oracle OpenWorld, Oracle NetSuite ran a one-day SuiteConnect event. Enterprise Times caught up with Brian Chess, GVP Cloud Operations at Oracle NetSuite and Craig Sullivan, GVP Product Management at NetSuite. We talked about the new announcements in NetSuite 19.2 and, in particular, the move to sit on Oracle’s Cloud Infrastructure. This means that NetSuite will be in 24 Oracle’s datacentres around the world within 18 months. Brian Chess, GVP Cloud Operations at Oracle NetSuite NetSuite is seeing no slowdown in its growth. But, as it grows, so too do challenges with running its own datacentres and infrastructure. It has decided, therefore, that the future means moving to sit firmly atop Oracle’s products. That relationship has always been there but now it is much tighter. The advantage of being on Oracle Autonomous Database, for example, is better security, scalability and all the self-managing tasks that OAD does. Importantly, this also means that NetSuite can begin to use some of those capabilities to improve what it surfaces to customers. Sullivan talks about providing customers with pre-built reports that save time. Craig Sullivan, Senior VP of Enterprise and International Products for NetSuite There is also interest in bringing in new technology. Voice assistants and chat bots have had a lot of press. But they are not the only potential technologies that NetSuite could introduce. Oracle has been talking up its technology stack including support for IoT, Blockchain and in-memory. All of these are possible in the future for NetSuite customers, especially as OAD reduces the database footprint through its autonomous management. To hear what Chess and Sullivan had to say, listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
On day one of  DevOps World and Jenkins World, the Contributor Summit took place. Enterprise Times was lucky enough to catch up with Kohsuke Kawaguchi, CTO, CloudBees and creator of Jenkins. Kawaguchi was much in demand during the summit as Jenkins prepared for a major set up updates to its products. Kawaguchi said that this is one of the few times the Jenkins has held a contributor summit to get everyone together. With contributors spread around the world, it’s hard to create a real collaborative environment. In Kawaguchi’s keynote, he announced five products as the Jenkins five super powers. He said that the Contributor Summit was a chance to update the community and get them engaged with these new products. CloudBees has worked hard to keep the Jenkins community at the heart of what it does and the Contributor Summit was a chance to show that. Two years ago, Kawaguchi told us that Jenkins was working to clean up the number of plug-ins. It launched the Adopt A Plug-in programme to help those that no longer have time to support a plug-in. Kawaguchi says this is about thanking people for their stewardship and it is working really well. For many open source projects this ia tricky problem to solve and few have managed to do what Jenkins has done. Jenkins is all about continuous integration and continuous delivery. Kawaguchi is keen to move beyond the idea of a plug-in world to something that is more responsive to user demand. While it will use the plug-ins as a base, the goal is to become more adaptive and deliver new capabilities in a continuous fashion. Kawaguchi also talked about automation and the benefits of CI/CD when it comes to security. With Kawaguchi coming from the open source space we also asked if CloudBees recruited Jenkins skills from its contributors. The answer was no and in the podcast Kawaguchi explains why. One project that was announced earlier this year and which has been getting a lot of traction is Jenkins X. It is focused on brining Jenkins and Kubernetes together To hear more of what Kawaguchi had to say listen to the podcast. Where can I get it? obtain it, for Android devices from play.google.com/music/podcasts use the Enterprise Times page on Stitcher use the Enterprise Times page on Podchaser listen to the Enterprise Times channel on Soundcloud listen to the podcast (below) or download the podcast to your local device and then listen there
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Podcast Details

Started
May 8th, 2017
Latest Episode
Apr 27th, 2020
Release Period
Daily
No. of Episodes
259
Avg. Episode Length
16 minutes
Explicit
No

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