Grow Your Video Business

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Rejection hurts. Nobody likes the feeling of it. But we need to take risks in our lives and businesses for progress to happen. Today’s guest shares some great advice for how to get over rejection and even turn it into an asset. Key Takeaways All your communication to clients should center on getting them what they want. Be clear on what the problem is that you can solve for them and how you are going to do that. Everything else is just details. Your business needs systems in place if you are going to have any freedom. The consistency that these systems provide will give you the time and space you need to free up your time. About Den Lennie Den Lennie is a true veteran of video broadcast and production having worked in this industry for two and a half decades. He is a business coach and marketing strategist who partners with video professionals to grow their video business. Making Connections Without Fear Den explains why it’s easier than many think to make the connections needed to grow their business. In a world where most people rely on texts and emails, an old-fashioned phone call gets overlooked. Actually picking up the phone and making that call sets you apart immediately. Den describes what you can start doing right away to build the confidence needed to make these important calls. This means moving past the fear of rejection. If you want to be a successful entrepreneur, you need to take risks. When you think about it though, reaching out to prospective clients doesn’t actually risk much. They may say no. That’s okay. As Den explains, each rejection gets you that much closer to someone ready to say yes. What Your Clients Really Want From You Remember that your clients don’t care about your gadgets and equipment. All those little details that help you make amazing videos are not what is going to land clients. What they care about is certainty. Be consistent with your systems and how you present your business. Interestingly, Den has found that the more consistent and disciplined you are in your business, the more creative you can be. It’s this structure that allows you to find the time you need to enjoy doing what you want to do. How do you deal with rejection? What systems give you more freedom? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: Having the guts to make the right connections [4:40] Overcoming the fear of rejection by building confidence [9:10] Why your clients don’t care about what you care about [20:50] How discipline brings freedom [25:00] Building resilience through failure and setbacks [34:00]   Quotes “Get to no as quickly as possible. You want to be calling people, connecting with people, and then saying no, because the more nos you get, the closer you are to a yes.” [8:45] “If you want to be an entrepreneur, you have to solve problems. And the more problems you solve, the more money you will make. The more people who you help, the more money you will make.” [10:25] “If you want to run a video business, you have to step back from editing, and then shooting, and then become a producer. But you can still have creative input because your creativity shifts to creating a business and opportunity for your team and providing a future for families.” [28:03]   Links: Join Grow Your Video Business on Facebook Sign up for the free Client Budget Workshop Core Storyblocks Find Den Lennie online Follow Den on Linkedin  Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!   Other Episodes You May Enjoy Episode 209: What Happened This Year and My Goals for the Next
Although the best advice urges us to pick a niche and stick with it, that’s really hard to do. We’re creative people and entrepreneurs. We want to do all the things. It’s in our very nature. That’s why stepping back and taking a more hands-off approach can be a challenge. Today’s guest understands the struggle and has some great advice for any of you going through it. Key Takeaways Having a well-defined process for bringing in employees is essential. Have your workflow structures in place and refine them as needed. Give new hires a trial-run to see if they like what you’re doing. This will let you step back and hand over responsibility as smoothly as possible. Getting work takes a lot more than making a great video. Your personality and the connections you make are just as, if not more, important. Cultivate being the person that others think of when they need video. Be the person who they can always deliver when called on and regularly work on maintaining those relationships. About Anthony Seratelli Anthony started Jersey Filmmaker while playing baseball, mixing his love for sports and storytelling to build a brand synonymous with innovation and creative excellence. With help from teammates, family, and friends, he co-starred in and produced one-of-a-kind content ranging from comedic sketches to short features to documenting historical moments in sports. Gaining experience in cinematography, editing, VFX composition, and sound design, he used his platform to develop a niche in filmmaking and a creative game plan that has taken him all over the world.  Upon retiring from baseball, Anthony shifted his efforts to the other side of the camera and aligned a roster of all-star directors, cinematographers, producers, editors, and audio specialists to take on projects of every scale and genre. He now brings his vision and creativity to a larger audience and a variety of programming opportunities. Being More Hands-off as Your Business Grows As business owners, it’s only natural to become protective of all the aspects of our company. Anthony and I describe how we learned to let go and why it’s an essential part of growing your business. Many of us start these businesses because we want more freedom. Well, that’s something you can’t get if you have your hands in every aspect of it. This is why it’s crucial to bring in more people as you grow. While this takes cultivating a lot of trust on your part, it’s necessary. Anthony highly recommends refining your workflow and using trial-runs to make onboarding as smooth as possible.  Marketing by Personality Also, the key to growing and maintaining your business is being reliable. Anthony and I discuss what it takes to be the person who others think of when they need a project. This goes way beyond the videos that you make. Rather, it is centered on consistency and just being likable and good to work with. Often, people will remember what it’s like to work with you as much, or maybe even more, than your videos themselves. Being humble, kind, and ready to serve is the best marketing you can do. It’s that which will bring you to the front of their mind when they need a project. What is one thing in your business that you can change or improve this year? How would building a bigger team change what you do inside your business? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: The importance of not doing all the things and how to not do them [4:00] The most crucial step when hiring someone [12:35] Overcoming the challenges of remote work [21:30] Why building relationships result in the best ROI [28:30] Tips and tricks for better package pricing [36:05]   Quotes “Getting your hands off of anything as you grow is really difficult ‘cause you ingrain yourself in it; you know every aspect of it. That’s what I love about that - that I know everything and it’s really hard to let it go and not know everything that’s going on. But it’s also really cool when you get the right people in place who you trust and want to work with.” [6:01] “People can create what I’m creating with $100,000 worth of gear with an iPhone. It’s scary if you think of it that way but I’m not scared because at the same time we provide a service with not just the quality of the content but obviously our minds are creative. It’s something different that we bring to the table.” [31:45] “I got into this because of a love of creating. But then I started building a business and I love that just as much. One of the things I didn’t realize would intrigue me so much or make me so happy and excited to be in the business world is building the team and paying people.” [47:59]   Links: Join Grow Your Video Business on Facebook Sign up for the free Client Budget Workshop Core Storyblocks Find Anthony Seratelli online Follow Anthony on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter I Am Athlete Podcast   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
It’s that time of the year again. Well, it’s the end of the year. That’s why I want to take some time to talk about how it went. There have been wins and there have been losses. Some goals were met and others weren’t. I hope that this will help you get some perspective on how 2020 went for you and set you up for an amazing year ahead. Key Takeaways The business and video landscape changed drastically this year. This meant that I had to shift my goals in real-time. Although there were many shortcomings, there were also many successes both expected and unforeseen. A Rocky Year Indeed As I imagine it was for you, this past year was a challenge. Plans went out the window pretty fast and we had to adapt very quickly. It’s no surprise that we fell short of our revenue goals. There was even a point when I wasn’t sure if my video production business would even survive. A Year of Pivots I’d spent years building my business on meeting and connecting new people. When everything went into lockdown, we had to get creative. That’s when we pivoted to webinars and virtual summits. This became a success that exponentially expanded my email list. Upon reflection, I've come to understand that while the pandemic and shutdowns have certainly been negative, there are still many aspects for which I am grateful.  While I enjoy the work that I do, I know I won’t do it forever. One of my goals for this year was to become superfluous in the sales aspect of my video production company. That’s why, from the start of the year, I worked to put all the pieces together so that my potential replacement could seamlessly come in and find new clients. This involved bringing on another virtual assistant to streamline the process and it has been totally worth it. New Goals for a New Year I’ve set some exciting goals going into the new year. We’re going to do more consulting and build out our own marketing strategy. I want to create a digital course to help people make their own videos according to our process. I also want to create a paid online community for my studio where clients can get the guidance they need concerning all things video. These are passive income ideas that have me really excited. So stay tuned over the coming year to find out how it goes. What are some of your goals for 2021? What pivots did you need to make this year? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: Why popularity is overrated [2:50] Getting creative with webinars, virtual summits, and course creation during the shutdown [9:00] How offering video blueprint workshops have led to greater customer satisfaction [19:00] Building a company where you can be replaceable [24:50] Adapting a schedule for greater satisfaction [34:10] New and exciting goals for 2021 [37:40]   Quotes “Who cares if you’re popular? If you’re a business, you can be popular if that leads to more business. But if it doesn’t lead to more business, then who the heck cares? Then it’s all about ego.” [8:25] “My goal and hope is not to be required to run our production business. I want our video production business to be able to run without me.” [25:09] “If you’re not blocking off your schedule, I would challenge you to do that. Look at your schedule. Look at all the things that you need to be doing and heavily consider blocking off your days. You could be more efficient if you’re just thinking about one thing versus moving all over the place and trying to do all the things every single day.”[37:22]   Links: Join Grow Your Video Business on Facebook Get the free Budget Workshop Storyblocks Core The Video Blueprint Method SlingStudio   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Turning down opportunities can sometimes be a good thing for you and your business. It’s not easy to say no to jobs and money. Yet, strategically doing so opens up doors to what you actually want to do. Today’s guests have successfully built their studio around this idea. Key Takeaways It’s natural to want to branch out your business into many fields. However, this will dilute your talent and energy. Instead, create a narrow focus on where your skills and passions intersect. About Joshua Martin Studios Joshua Martin Studios is a small production company based in the United States. It is co-run by founder Joshua Martin and business partner Cody Wales who focus on telling stories of the human condition. Lessons of Starting a New Studio From the very start, Joshua and Cody knew what type of studio they wanted to run. However, like any new small business, they had debts to pay. They tell how they learned very quickly to leave their egos behind and take the work they needed to get their business off the ground. While they feel driven as creatives to keep doing more and more, they realize that success in business means narrowing your focus and skills to excel at something in particular. Asking For the Impossible Now that they are working towards a clear vision for their studio, Joshua and Cody are able to take just the jobs they want. As a result, both they and their clients truly appreciate the videos that they make. A large part of their strategy involves asking for what they want and seeing what they can get from brands they want to work with. When the worst that can happen is getting no for an answer, these low-risk high-reward ventures have the potential to lead to great opportunities that otherwise would not happen. How have you narrowed your focus as you grow your business? What impossibilities would you like to ask for? Leave a comment on the episode page! In This Episode: Building a studio around your interests with brand support [5:40] The challenge of ambition and how to overcome it [14:40] The unique advantage of knowing what you do and don’t want to do [19:45] What happens when you leave your ego at the door when growing your business [28:00] Why you should ask other companies for things that seem impossible [30:46]   Quotes “There’s this constant desire to explore and do something new and if you’re taking on too much of that and managing it yourself, there’s a strong possibility that you’re going to burn yourself out creatively and in life.” [15:38] “I reach out to people where it might seem impossible because they’re a big brand or company. I think people might be surprised. You should not have an expectation that they’re going to say yes. That’s the key.” [32:28] “Whatever it is you’re going to go do, make sure you’re in the position to be very appealing to them. It’s not like always throwing a ‘hey, can we do this?’ out of nowhere. It’s more of like ‘this will be beneficial to you because it’s what we’re already doing.’” [35:58]   Links: Join Grow Your Video Business on Facebook Get the free Budget Workshop Storyblocks Core Find Joshua Martin Studios Online Follow Joshua Martin Studios on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Many of us get into this work to feed our creativity. We love to create and see our visions become reality. But we still have clients who have their own visions and ideas. It can be a tricky balance creating a business with the structure to satisfy both your clients and your own creative needs. Today’s guest explains how he manages to do just that. Key Takeaways Your business is built on relationships. Getting them right from the start leads to better work down the road. Take the time to suss out the good relationships from the bad first thing in order to assure that you’ll have a good working relationship as the project progresses. About Josh Emerick Josh is a DP and Producer from Zanesville, Ohio who leans on structure and planning to manifest what people perceive as creativity. He is mostly known for his work in music videos, but still actively shoots a lot of commercial work, weddings, and recently narrative films. Creating Systems for Efficiency and Creativity Systematized efficiency is a large part of how Josh structures his business. By automating as much as he can and preparing in advance when possible, Josh is able to maximize his efficiency while meeting or exceeding everyone’s expectations.  Josh also explains how his personal work fits into his business. By making his own work where he has complete creative control, Josh hopes to show potential future clients what he is capable of. Doing this not only feeds his own creative needs, it will attract exactly the types of clients he hopes to work with. Harnessing the Power of Referrals The challenge will always be finding new clients. Josh describes how referrals have been the boon of his business. There’s no magic formula to getting referrals. Being easy and fun to work with while serving your client’s needs is what it all comes down to. This can be done by setting the right expectations from the start and not backing down from them. Throughout this interview, Josh describes all the ways that he does just that. How do you manage client expectations? Do you have a lead magnet? Tell me about it in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: Building a business that feeds your creativity while pleasing clients [10:04] How to get referrals by doing the right work and setting expectations [17:00] The power of an email list to grow interest in your work [22:30] Using blog posts to position yourself as an expert [28:30] Whether or not to post packages and pricing on your website [33:40]   Quotes “Whether we’re doing a personal project, whether we’re doing a project for a client, I’m always trying to look at how we’re using our time and how do we break that down and automate as many things as possible.” [12:33] “I think it’s easy as creators to be like let’s make the most beautiful thing with the coolest lighting and the coolest camera. That plays a role, but how does that make your client feel? If I make someone feel good, they’re going to want to come back to me and they’re going to want to actually have a referral.” [17:38] “I have no problem educating on how we make something possible. But I don’t want to spend time educating you on what cinematography really costs and what a real production actually costs. Either you value it and you want to work with us or you don’t and that’s okay.” [36:34]   Links: Join Grow Your Video Business on Facebook Get the free Budget Workshop Storyblocks Core Find Josh Emerick online Follow Josh on Instagram | Facebook   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Your business will be made or broken on relationships. Building trust and being passionate is central to this. Whether it’s your team, your clients, or your competition, these relationships are crucial. Today’s guest has not only built an amazing business based on relationships but clearly loves what he does every day. Key Takeaways Finding opportunities to take on side-gigs will keep your skills sharp and allow you to do exciting work you otherwise couldn’t. There’s a lot of learning and inspiration that comes from branching out and trying new things that will help you constantly level-up as a filmmaker.  When building a team, start with trust and passion. Knowing that your people will faithfully and enthusiastically get the job done whether you’re there or not is central to a well-functioning business. About Chris Ray Chris is a filmmaker who got his start in action sports filming skateboarding videos. Since then, he has done a wide range of work with companies such as DC Shoes, NFL Films, Ford, GoPro, ESPN, and many more. Imbuing Your Work With Passion Chris has a great perspective on everything that he does. For one thing, he doesn’t view other filmmakers as competition. Instead, they’re an inspiration and possible collaborators. Chris loves his work so much that he seldom passes up an opportunity to make videos. When he doesn’t have a project, he makes one for himself. This passion to keep working on many different projects has allowed Chris to keep his skills well-honed as a filmmaker. Building an Amazing Team Chris doesn’t do it all alone. He has built up a solid team of filmmakers to help make and produce their videos. I know many of us are hesitant to hire people, but it is an essential part of growing your video business. Chris knows that the most important place to start when taking on new people is trust. You need to be able to trust your people to get the job done without you. That’s why you brought them on to begin with. When you find the right people who are passionate about the work, you’re well on your way to building a winning team. Have you hired team members? What qualities do you look for in them? How do you build trust in your business? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: The many sources of inspiration in filmmaking [4:45] Taking on side-gigs to refine your craft [7:30] The characteristics to look for when building a team [12:35] Learning to manage the work-life balance [13:40] The power of respect to make jobs run smoothly [17:30]   Quotes “I get inspired by others. I’m inspired by other filmmakers. I’m inspired by my team. Those are the people I want to work with. I’ve definitely learned that you can't do everything by yourself. I try to surround myself with other filmmakers that are great because it makes me better.” [5:30] “I still get scared every single time I get hit up for a freelance job. It’s still scary every time and I think that’s because I think I’m scared of failure. I just say yes and we go for it and we figure it out. That’s always been my advice to people: just say yes. Just do it.” [10:10] “Being respectful to people no matter what the role is, no matter what their level is, treating everybody with respect is a huge thing.” [17:39]   Links: Get free access to the Budget Workshop Storyblocks Core Find Chris Ray online Follow Chris on Instagram | Facebook Inovativ 10% discount code   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
As a freelancer or small business owner, buying gifts for your clients may feel frivolous and wasteful. The truth is, it can be a small investment with a huge reward. However, we often get it wrong when it comes to determining the best gifts to give. If you are hesitant to spend a little extra to treat your clients, this is the perfect episode to change your mind. Key Takeaways Showing up and giving with no strings attached attracts genuine reciprocity. Give these gifts at unexpected times. It leads to growth in relationships that may take time but will be stronger in the end. A world-class gift should focus on the recipient, not the giver. Thinking from the other person’s perspective and trying to understand what they really want forms strong and lasting bonds. About John Ruhlin John is the world’s leading authority in maximizing customer loyalty through radical generosity. He is the founder of and author of Giftology. John has been featured in Fox News, Forbes, Fast Company, Inc., and The New York Times. The True Power of a Proper Gift We all have the power to make other people’s lives better. John explains how going all-in on generosity creates the relationships to improve not only the recipient’s life but your own too. People remember when you go out of the way to be generous. When generosity is genuine, people are eager to reciprocate. It may not happen right away, but eventually what you give others will come back to benefit you. During that time, relationships will grow in depth to last for a lifetime. A Story as a Gift As filmmakers, we are uniquely positioned to give the most meaningful gifts of all: stories. John says that a thing you give is just a token. But, if it has a story behind it, something that explains its meaning, then it becomes a cherished artifact. Use your power as a storyteller to imbue gifts with personal meaning. Give people gifts that are not only meaningful but that keep you top of mind. This is the stuff that forges bonds between you and clients that are valuable beyond words. How can you create moments for your clients that make a difference for them? What meaningful and memorable gifts have you given or received? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: The power of radical generosity to change everything [4:30] What it means to invest in giftology [9:30] Why we need to make gifts about the people we give the gift to and not about ourselves [18:40] Why promotional products are not gifts [26:24] How to invest in something that makes you truly memorable [32:00] What you should do instead of wasting money on holiday gifts for your clients [36:03]   Quotes “Every business, and really every life, rises and falls on relationships…. When you show up powerfully for people and are radically generous, no matter who they are, if they’re human beings, relationships flourish if they show up powerfully and go all-in on things.” [4:41] “Language and word choice matter….. Based upon how it’s presented, it matters and makes somebody value it.” [17:50] “A gift showing up just out of the blue says I was thinking of you, versus it’s Christmas and I made money this year and feel like I should probably say thank you. Saying thank you the other ten months out of the year is way more effective. As a small business owner, that’s how you can spend less money than your competition and have 100 times more impact.“ [38:41]   Links: Join the Free Budget Workshop! Storyblocks Core Find John Ruhlin online Giftology System Giftology by John Ruhlin   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Those of us with a YouTube channel know this frustration. You put in a ton of work into creating amazing content, but no one sees it. It may be because of your naming strategy, scheduling, title, image, or something else entirely. With so much to keep in mind, wouldn’t it be nice to have the right information on your side? Key Takeaways Even if you’re busy with client work, find the time to shoot your own content. By showing people the behind-the-scenes of what you do, you are naturally and easily promoting your business. For best live streaming results, focus on having good audio by investing in a quality mic. Have a plan in place in case things go wrong, like losing a signal or connection. Investing in the right equipment will help ensure that everything goes smoothly once you go live. About Rob Balasabas Rob is a partnership growth manager at TubeBuddy. He is an active content creator on his own Linkedin, YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook channels. Rob works hard sharing a lot of video and content creation strategies, live streaming tips, as well as software and tool reviews. Getting Noticed to Promote Your Business on YouTube This week, Rob explains many of the ins and outs of getting seen on YouTube and other platforms.  Even if it doesn’t feel like it, there are countless opportunities to make content to promote your business. It doesn't have to be much. Even a short explainer video or live stream goes a long way. By putting a little time away each week to make your own content and do your own marketing you’ll stay relevant and discover new leads. The Power of Livestreaming Rob and I dive deep into the new role of live streaming in today’s world of video. Just about every social media platform has this feature and it presents many opportunities to promote your business. Rob describes how live streaming is allowing creators to stay regularly engaged with their audiences. From weekly live shows to course creation, live streaming can build communities and grow an audience. As such a simple yet effective tool, live streaming is something any content creator should consider. What could you live stream on video today? How can that help you engage with an audience? How can you use YouTube to regularly engage with your audience? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: Best practices for starting and growing your own YouTube channel [4:10] How collaboration with experts leads to more opportunities [13:10] Advice for the new role of live streaming [17:57] The best gear for live streaming [27:10] How to effectively schedule your uploads to YouTube [30:56] The most underrated feature on YouTube [34:00] Building a community rather than digging for clients [37:51]   Quotes “As creatives, you need to treat your business as your best client.” [7:43] “The main thing is your audio when it comes to live streaming. If you’re limited on budget, I always suggest investing in a mic first because people need to hear you even if they can’t see you very well.” [27:56] “You want to put out as much content as you can so that you can build up your portfolio so that YouTube has some things to share and suggest to potential viewers.” [31:59] “Don’t use it as a commercial….People don’t want to be sold. They want to be taught. Answer their questions. That’s what people are searching for on YouTube; they’re searching questions.” [36:00]   Links: Get Access to the Free Budget Workshop Storyblocks Core Follow Rob Balasabas on YouTube | Instagram | Linkedin | Facebook   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Tax planning. Just those words make me shudder. Over the last 17 years, I’ve learned some hard lessons on this subject. I really wish I knew what I know now when I got started. It would have saved a lot of worry and frustration. While this is not the most glamorous topic, this is the kind of stuff that makes or breaks a business. Key Takeaways It’s well worth the upfront costs of having an expert do your books. Not only can they save you money at tax time, but they will help you avoid making costly mistakes in the first place. About Jeremy Doorn As a ten-year-plus employee of Core Wealth Management, Jeremy Doorn helps small businesses do a better job of tax planning. In addition to firm administration, he handles business advisory services and business succession planning for his clients. The Importance of Expert Help Jeremy tells us that you don’t need to be a tax or accounting expert to run a successful business. But you might want to find one to help you out. Getting at least a basic education on how to run your numbers will save a lot of trouble further down the road. Furthermore, having an accountant or other tax expert on your side will help identify tax benefits that you may have otherwise missed and avoid costly mistakes. Bookkeeping as Business Strategy In some ways, proper bookkeeping is aligned with the strategy of your business. When your revenue and expenses are truly known, you can identify your profit. You can’t make the best decisions for your company without this knowledge. This is your business that you’ve created. It’s your responsibility to make the most informed decisions that you can to make it profitable. That doesn’t mean you need to be an expert on all things. But you do need to find the right advice to make it a success. What has been the biggest lesson you’ve learned about taxes or bookkeeping since you started your business? Has a tax expert saved you money and helped you grow your business? Tell me about it in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: The peace of mind that comes with having an expert look over your business’ numbers [5:00] What a tax expert can offer that software can’t [10:10] How to avoid tax planning mistakes before they become a problem [16:00] Common mistakes in overlooked tax savings opportunities [20:45] Software and apps to make your bookkeeping easier [26:32] The most important financial metrics to pay attention to [32:40]   Quotes “It’s about knowing where your business is at and not having to put all the work in yourself. It’s this whole peace of mind that you have somebody looking at your numbers.” [6:34] “A tax return is just a scoreboard for last year’s score. That’s fine, but you can’t do anything with a tax return this year that’s for last year. You gotta do it currently while you’re going through it.” [12:18] “You need to go do creative stuff. Go tell stories. Go do all that stuff. You don’t need to be doing bookkeeping. Once you get to a certain point, you got to start looking into unloading that onto somebody else.” [17:22] “Every business is different. You need to pick out what is most important for your business depending on what you’re actually doing… and track those.” [33:30]   Links: Storyblocks Core Profit First by Mike Michalowicz QBO   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Making smart gear purchases can help grow your video business. It can also be an expensive distraction. With such a large variety of choices and features, it’s easy to get lost down a rabbit hole of gear. To help shed light on this, I’ve brought on a true expert to this episode. If you are new to live streaming, make sure to test it out thoroughly before you go live. Get the right gear, but don’t go overboard. Once you are comfortable with what you have, try it out and get familiar with all the settings. When it’s time to do the real thing, you’ll know what to expect and come off as a pro. Key Takeaways Be proactive with your customer service. Being quick to respond and communicate reduces anxieties and makes customers feel heard and valued. This is what ultimately leads to repeat business and referrals. About Chris Monlux Chris is the multimedia editor for Videomaker and their magazine. He conducts and writes all of their reviews and produces all of their learning videos content. This guy knows his gear! The Essential Gear for the Modern Videomaker Get ready to nerd out on a lot of gear in this episode. Chris describes why many different cameras are in his collection and why he enjoys them for their different features. However, just because a camera has all the bells and whistles doesn’t mean it's a good investment. Before you get your hands on an expensive piece of equipment, you should consider whether or not your clients would actually benefit from it. For obvious reasons, live-streaming has become more popular than ever this year. There’s a lot of tech to consider if you do live streaming and having the right stuff can really make a difference. Overall, Chris recommends keeping it simple. Just a couple of cameras and the right software should get the job done. Where you succeed or fail will hinge a lot more on your content and marketing than it will on the tech that you use. The Best Approach to Customer Service Of course, gear is only one part of being a successful filmmaker. Customer service is a huge part of the rest of it. Chris describes how being quick to respond to your customer’s needs is central to this. Overall, your ability to anticipate their needs, communicate promptly and clearly and exceed expectations will keep them coming back for more. What is the most essential piece of gear in your collection? Have you ever regretted buying a piece of equipment?  Tell me in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: Why Chris doesn’t have a favorite camera [4:28] Finding creative fulfillment in your work [8:40] How gear can both help grow or sidetrack your business [15:20] The best gear and strategies for live streaming [29:10] Anticipating the unpredictabilities when shooting live events [42:00] How good customer service can save the day when problems arise [43:45]   Quotes “I’m getting my creative juices out at work. I’m getting paid to have fulfillment creatively and that was always so valuable to me.” [9:22] “I like to get inspired by my equipment, but to covet those new features when there isn’t a need is unfortunate” [17:27] “We want those things that look really neat, but if someone didn’t tell you what it was shot in and it did the job, how much are you really going to care?” [26:46] “If you underpromise and overperform, your client is going to be so excited about what they get because it’s more than they expected. All it is is setting expectations.” [51:19]   Links: Download the 30-day guide to jumpstart your video business! Storyblocks Core Find Videomaker online Follow Videomaker on Facebook | Instagram | Linkedin | Twitter | YouTube The Videomaker Podcast Fuji X-T4 Review Cheapest live streaming setup for home professionals Liveview Blackmagic ATEM Mini Pro Delivering Happiness by Tony Hsieh   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Seventeen years of running my own video business have taught me that success is not about getting the best shot, or having the best demo reel or the best gear. There’s so much more to it. It boils down to your priorities and how you choose to focus your energy and time. In short, you need to become an essentialist. Key Takeaways Not everything is equally important. Start your day with the question of what is most important today and focus on that. That will set your priorities in order and help assure that you focus only on what is most essential to you. Set boundaries. It is up to you to decide what to do with your time. Stay in control of it and let others know when you are available and when you are not. This leads to efficiency and more overall satisfaction. About Greg McKeown Greg McKeown is the author of the amazing book and New York Times bestseller, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less. He is also the founder of McKeown Inc., a company with a mission to teach essentialism to millions of people around the world. Their clients include Adobe, Apple, Airbnb, Cisco, Google, Facebook, and Pixar. Creating boundaries and clarity for success If you’ve ever felt busy without being productive (and who hasn’t?), Greg has some advice for you. You need to create the right boundaries around your priorities and stick to them. If you ask yourself every morning what the most important thing to do today, you will be well on the path to becoming an essentialist.  Being an essentialist certainly has its challenges. Even for Greg, it’s an ongoing journey. Over time, he’s developed a planning system that he continues to revise. Consciously and continuously developing clarity on goals and priorities takes effort. Without it though, necessary clarity will remain out of reach. Identifying what is essential to you Greg wants us all to identify essential parts of our lives that we are underinvesting in. When we realize why these things matter to us, and truly visualize what achieving it would be, we can start to reprioritize our daily lives and be one big step closer to essentialism. Becoming an essentialist is tough. It takes vulnerability. However, striving to build your life around only what is essential to you is the key to everything. What is something essential to you that you are currently under-investing in? How do you create boundaries to protect your priorities? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: The role of community in implementing essentialism [7:20] Retaking control over your life through proper prioritizing [10:50] The struggles that come with being an essentialist [18:40] Strategies to get more done by doing less [22:02] Concrete ways to set boundaries to regain control over your time [26:45] Questions and actions to identify what is most essential in your life [33:00]   Quotes “If you don’t prioritize your life, someone else will.” [11:52] “You have to create space to prioritize, plan, think, and reflect so that you can actually make thoughtful decisions. You become strategic.” [22:52] “It’s so vulnerable. It’s so personal. Also, I think we think people know - but they can’t know.” [44:22]   Links: Storyblocks Core Find Greg McKeown online Follow Greg on Instagram | Twitter | Linkedin | YouTube Essentialism by Greg McKeown   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
It’s hard to believe it - 200 episodes! When I started this podcast, I never imagined that I’d make it to 200 episodes. But here we are. I know I’m here today because of you. I do this show on a weekly basis for you. Your countless messages of gratitude keep me going. This episode is going to be different. I have a bunch of really amazing and fun messages from listeners like you. It really is both a joy and honor to make this show and get to know so many of you. Some of you have been there from the beginning. Others have recently started listening. Either way, I really appreciate you coming along with me on this amazing journey. With that in mind, I’m turning the mic over to you. This episode is full of messages from my many listeners who share some takeaways from the show over the years. We’ve learned a lot together and I want to hear how you all have benefited over the last 200 episodes. If you weren’t able to send in a message for the episode but want to share how Studio Sherpas has helped you in your business and/or life, I’d love it if you left a comment on the episode page! What are some of your biggest takeaways from this show? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: My expressions of gratitude for the people who make this show possible [4:10] Key takeaways and messages of thanks from listeners [10:55] What’s coming next on this podcast [46:18]   Quotes “The biggest takeaway has been to really think about our business much more; to not just see ourselves as creatives but as business owners.” - Matt [11:25] “I’m an informed entrepreneur who can still make art and having both of those is what’s made me so successful.” - Shyah [17:54] “Ryan is as raw and human as it gets which is awesome because it inspires everyone else to be the same way.” - Maxwell [19:47] “We learn very quickly that clients have needs. Once you address your client’s needs, the money will follow.” - Jeff [33:07] “There are times when I’ve gone through difficulties. During those times it was really helpful to have Ryan’s raw authenticity about struggles that he had gone through and how he’s overcome them. It gave me hope that it was possible to get out of these things.” [44:17]   Links: Join the Grow Your Video Business Facebook Group Jumpstart Your Video Business Storyblocks Core   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Have you ever had a friend or family member ask you for a big discount or to make a free video? If it hasn’t happened yet, it’s only a matter of time. As a giving person, it’s tough for me to turn them down. However, as a business owner, it’s really hard to do the work that I do for free and bad for my business in the long-run. Key Takeaways It’s okay to say no to any project, even if that means turning down family or friends. Your priority is running your business. Once its needs are met, you can decide how and when you truly want to give back. You can turn down a request for discounts by saying you don’t have the time, or that you simply don’t do discounts. Adding value by providing more and going the extra mile will always be more rewarding than not charging enough for your work. The Great Power of Video Having met hundreds of people in this industry I know one thing to be true: we’ve got big hearts. We want to do good in the world by telling stories. Video is perhaps the most powerful medium for doing good through storytelling. I bet a lot of us don’t even charge what we should be because we’re so passionate about this work. The Importance of ‘No’ When it’s your passion that also pays the bills, it’s hard to draw boundaries that prevent people from feeling awkward or hurt. But you can’t stay in business if you keep giving away your talents. There will still be times when it does make sense to do something pro bono. However, you need to be intentional about those projects that you choose to do for less. Taking Care of Business So You Can Take Care of Others In the end, it comes down to being able to pay your bills, your people, and yourself. Beyond that, you want your business to thrive. When those needs are taken care of, you can decide where, when, and how to give back. It shouldn't be based on guilt or obligation. Instead, when you have all your business’ basic needs taken care of, you can truly give back in meaningful ways. How do you give back while still taking care of your business?  Have you been asked to give away your work? Tell me how you responded in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: The true costs of not getting paid for your work [5:00] How to respond when someone you know asks you to make a video for them [9:00] Times when it might make sense to do free or discounted work [16:06] Saying ‘no’ without guilt [21:12] What happens when you add value to your work [23:33]   Quotes “The medium that we have at our disposal is the very tool, probably the most influential powerful tools in the last century, to be able to create moving pictures that evoke emotion.” [6:46] “The worst thing that you could say if I ask you for a discount is ‘no’. That’s fine. I can move along and I will do my best to not take offense at that.” [17:34] “I want to be more open-handed. I want to be gentler with the people who approach me with those questions. But at the same time, I want to be wise.” [20:57] “I would much rather add value than feel that we’re not valued enough.” [23:46]   Links: Storyblocks Core Join the Studio Sherpas Party! Max Profit Workshop   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
There’s a lot to consider as your business grows. When I started my studio, I was my only employee. It wasn’t too long before I realized I needed to hire some people on to keep things running. I was hesitant. It costs a lot to take on employees. But what I soon realized was that a larger team led to more and better work in the long run. Key Takeaways There’s a cost in hiring employees. However, having a team allows you to focus on the work you need to. When done thoughtfully and intentionally, growing your team leads to more clients, higher quality work, and more overall satisfaction in the end. It’s important that clients understand how you build your budget. Itemizing the gear you use will help convey the value of the work they receive. It may be useful to ask them their budget from the start and let them know what you can realistically offer within that. Attitude is everything when working with clients. You’re there to help your clients achieve their goals. Staying positive and supportive while offering your expertise will lead to high levels of satisfaction and repeat business. About Ariel Martinez Ariel Martinez is a Miami-Based documentary filmmaker specializing in storytelling, cinematography, commercial video production, and conference videography. With over 10 years as a freelancer, he has specialized in operating as a one-man-band without compromise. Considerations About Growing Your Team As someone who handles all aspects of production, Ariel strives to offer his clients quality work at a lower cost. With the right vision and gear, he is able to get clients, shoot video, edit, and deliver outstanding films. But it’s a lot of work, not all of it what he’d prefer to do. We discuss what growing a team looks like as a business expands and the benefits and drawbacks of doing so. Presenting Your Gear and Attitude to Clients Ariel owns a lot of his own gear. Of course, there are quite a bit of upfront costs in acquiring it. We talk about building those costs into your pricing models. Ariel has found that by itemizing the gear used and presenting that to clients in a budget, they’ll better understand the value of what they pay for. Perhaps the most important asset to growth and longevity is a positive attitude. Ariel and I have seen this in action. Remember, you are there to serve your clients and their vision. While you should still offer your expert opinion, it’s crucial that you do so in a positive manner. People will remember your attitude as much as they remember the work itself. Have you grown a team? Let me know how it has paid off in the comments on the episode page! How do you bring a positive attitude to the set every day? Tell me in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: How Ariel got into freelance video production [6:00] The challenges and advantages that come with working by yourself versus building a team [13:52] How to charge for jobs while serving clients at a high level [25:30] What happens when you own your own gear [35:10] The importance of positivity to grow your business [42:38]   Quotes “It’s really a dream come true for me that I can do what I love, enjoy it so much, and have flexibility.” [13:16] “I don’t think there’s a wrong or right way to do things. There’s what you enjoy. There’s what makes more money. There’s what makes less money. There’s different tactics that you can take on every avenue that you consider.” [24:20] “You might be the professional that they’re looking for. But at the same time, you have to serve them for what they’re looking for. They might want to go in a certain direction. Whether you agree with it or not, you’re there to serve them and their vision, not your own.” [43:46] “Just keep pushing. Love the passion. Love the work. Love the process. Just never stop learning.” [49:53]   Links: Download the 30-day guide to jumpstart your video business Find Ariel Martinez online Follow Ariel on Instagram | Vimeo | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube iFilmmaker Podcast   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
This year has not gone as expected. That’s true for my business as much as anything else. The mechanisms that used to bring clients and projects my way don’t work like they used to. However, virtual summits and meetups have exploded. Today, I’m sharing how I’ve been harnessing the potential of these virtual events to grow my business. Key Takeaways In times of COVID, we need to shift how we build networks. Online summits, virtual meetups, and webinars are a great way to fill the gaps left by in-person events. Hosting one of these summits will even show you to be an authority in your field. Lessons of Running a Virtual Summit Over the last few months, I’ve been putting together a virtual summit for digital marketers. I’ve learned a lot in the process. Not only do I think this event will provide great value for those who attend, but it will also help grow and maintain a network of people who may become clients someday. Growing Your Network I’ve found that hosting these events I’ve positioned myself as an authority in my niche. As a result, more people in my expanding network are going to think of me when they need video or something else that I offer. It will naturally build connections that wouldn’t otherwise exist. Finding and Serving Your Niche You can’t just create an event for everyone though. You need to get very focussed on a specific niche. The narrower, the better. If you’re not sure, reach out to your network and ask what topics they most resonate with at the moment. With that information, you’ll have a great start to building a successful virtual event. Would you ever consider creating a webinar or an online summit? What would it be about? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: How virtual summits are filling the gap left by in-person events [3:25] Growing your network with online events [9:27] How shifting to a bigger online presence changes how we think about business [16:37] Why focusing on a specific niche is the best way to succeed with a webinar or summit [19:14] Why few things are more important than your email list [25:00]   Quotes “We’re getting exposure to a ton of people who we wouldn’t normally be…. And as the hosts, we are the ones who look like we’re friends with all of the presenters.” [13:16] “When you take leadership, when you take action, when you decide to do this, people will take notice because not everybody is getting in the ring.” [15:25] “As you do webinars and summits, your email list will grow. It is so important to grow your email list.” [25:01]   Links: Share your story to get on the 200th episode! Download the 30-day guide to jumpstart your video business   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
As a small business owner, you actually have a lot of flexibility. You can pivot what you do and make offers that big companies can’t. Especially during tough times like these, you can find opportunities that may not have existed before. As today’s guest is going to tell you, there’s a gift that lies in scarcity. Key Takeaways It’s important to keep priorities in mind when running a small business. Especially when times are tough, it’s a good idea to ask yourself what your goals are. By looking at what gives you the best return on investment, you can prioritize the most important parts of your business. Even if a client doesn’t want to move forward on a project quite yet, there is probably still something that you can do for them. Look back at past projects and share your ideas with them. Maintaining helpful lines of communication now will pay off later when the situation improves. No matter how amazing your work is, if you don’t market it, you won’t sell it. Marketing, when done with integrity, is not a sleazy thing. You have something to offer that other people need. When you reach out there, you will find that there is more abundance than you may have thought. About Prof Kelly Goldsmith Professor Kelly Goldsmith is an award-winning, Yale-educated behavioral scientist who also appeared on Survivor Africa. She examines consumers’ responses to uncertainty and scarcity, uncovering, and explaining seemingly paradoxical effects. Looking to Scarcity for Good Ideas It’s common to question what you’re doing in business during tough times. Kelly recognizes that it is actually during times like these that some of the best ideas are born. Maybe you’ve been sitting on a particularly innovative idea but haven’t acted on it yet. It’s also a time to reassess how you’re marketing your services. Getting Cozy with Marketing Even if you have something great to offer, you need to market it appropriately. Marketing to everyone will only lead to disappointment. Even though it may feel like you’re excluding potential customers, you need to find your niche. This will differentiate yourself from the competition and also lead to more referrals at the same time. Do you have a business idea that you haven't tried yet? Tell me what’s holding you back in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: How and why to reassess what you do in the current economy [8:40] New ways to market your services when the market is down [13:30] How to get inspired by scarcity [20:28] Becoming better friends with the idea of selling [22:10] The dangers of marketing to everyone [26:10] Leveraging the agility of your small business [30:40]   Quotes Everybody here is a creative person. Creative people are the best at coming up with new ways to make money.” [11:04] “Fundamentally, any goal is associated with a sense of scarcity. Anything you want to get, be, or do means you have to recognize what you don’t have.” [21:52] “The benefit of being in a small business is that you can be agile and you can adapt. If you feel like you can’t, then you have a misperception about what’s great about your industry.” [31:28]   Links: Tell me about your transformation for a chance to get featured in Episode 200! Sign up for the Studio Sherpas Webclass Storyblocks Find Prof. Kelly Goldsmith online Follow Kelly on Linkedin | Twitter | Instagram| Goodreads To Sell is Human by Daniel Pink Influence by Robert Cialdini Small is the New Big by Seth Godin The 4-Hour Workweek by Tim Ferris Second Life Podcast   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
An emotional connection often exists between creatives and our creations. We want to have an influence and an impact with what we do. So it’s easy to take it personally when people either like or dislike our work. Yet there are many ways to stay in control when putting your creations out into the world. Key Takeaways When presenting early drafts to clients, the less you critique, the better. Second-guessing your work to your clients can lead down the wrong path of unnecessary revisions. Instead, focus on what you’re excited and happy about. As creatives, we’re trying to strike a balance between sharing what we do with the world while still turning a profit. To maintain that balance over the long-run, you need to constantly reassess your process. Sometimes it means growing a team. Other times, you’ll need to take on more roles yourself. About Josiah Moore Josiah Moore is a freelance director and editor from upstate New York. Josiah stays busy in all aspects of music video production, be it client communication, shooting, building sets, and late nights editing. Balancing Creativity and Business It can be tough striking a balance as both creatives and entrepreneurs. Josiah knows the experience of creating projects that then become the property of his clients. It’s difficult to create something that is yours only to hand ownership of it to someone else. Josiah finds that making his own behind-the-scenes videos is to share with his followers is a great creative outlet. Passion projects are also a great way to stay motivated to do what you love. The Value of Good Communication As someone who handles so many aspects of a production, Josiah finds that upfront communication with clients is paramount. Letting them know the revision process and what it will cost prevents scope creep. Being clear on the shooting and editing schedule will keep things on track. Most of all, being in clear communication about your process and pricing builds and maintains the relationships that will drive your business in the long run. What’s your long-term plan? Do you have a plan for retirement? Let me know in the comments on the episode page! What’s your revision process like? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: The process of profiting with music videos [5:19] Using behind-the-scene footage to engage with an audience [7:15] The emotional vulnerability that accompanies our creative works [11:30] Harnessing efficiency to maximize profitability [17:15] Different ways to approach the revision process [21:12] [25:16] How to consider the long-term aspects of freelance work [30:00] Why gear lust will stunt your growth [38:56]   Quotes “How can I engage with and grow an audience that is invested in me as a creative rather than the people I work for?” [8:47] “I’ve been finding when I really try to strip back and try to do the bare minimum and grind a little bit harder and take on a couple more roles myself, it’s really not going to hurt the project. We’re going to be able to be that much quicker, more efficient, and profitable.” [18:50] “I think the struggle is that, as a creative person, I often find myself falling into thinking that whatever my latest work is is how I present myself. I don’t think that has to be the case. I still think you can have passion projects.” [37:54]   Links: Sign up for the free Studio Sherpas Webclass Storyblocks Find Josiah Moore online Follow Josiah on Instagram | Twitter | YouTube   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
How do you set yourself apart by impressing your clients? Hopefully, it is something that can land you bigger and better jobs. If you can be remarkable, you’ll find yourself with bigger jobs than you thought possible. Key Takeaways You don’t need to be an expert in everything. Asking for help, building systems, and seeking out the expertise of others is essential for your business to thrive. Build a team if you can. Outsource when needed. True success is a collaborative effort.  Going out of your way to find opportunities to be excellent and unanticipated will set you apart. Being remarkable means doing more than what others expect from you. Going out of your way to build these positive relationships will result in a massive return on your time and effort. About Patrick Moreau and Rebecca Rapple Today, I’m joined by my friends at Muse Storytelling, founder Patrick Moreau and CEO Rebecca Rapple. Their mission is to create well-told stories that lead to positive change. Using the science of storytelling, Muse has told the stories of a diverse collection of brands including Fujifilm and Four Seasons. Getting the Support You Need to Succeed Success rarely occurs without help. Rebecca and Patrick know first-hand that one person can seldom do it all themself. Getting outside help and new perspectives will help move the needle of any business forward. It takes courage to admit that you don’t have all the answers, but the alternative isn’t worth the risk. Being Remarkable in Order to Succeed Success hinges on being noticed and remembered. In other words, you need to be remarkable. Rebecca and Patrick strive to do just that in their business. You may not feel that you are remarkable, but you are. We all are. Storytelling has the power to showcase your remarkability. If you can seize the moment, take a chance, and tell an unforgettable story, you will make your mark.  Once you identify what makes you excellent, find ways to automate it. That frees you up to find ways to do the unexpected. You’ll have extra time and energy to go above and beyond and impress your clients in ways they never expected. What are currently doing to be remarkable? What could you try to stand apart? Share it with us in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: What it means to profit with a purpose [6:49] The power of a team to foster psychological safety at work [12:10] The exponential return of being remarkable [20:45] Building systems of excellence to make a bigger impact [26:48] The ingredients of being remarkable that any solopreneur can harness [30:50] How Muse’s educational programs help filmmakers develop successful systems for their businesses [38:35]   Quotes: “One of the things that we always talk about is profiting with purpose. In other words, identify opportunities for your business to make money so you can get the things that you want.” [6:49] “Being remarkable literally means being worthy of remark. It has to be special enough that someone would actually comment on it proactively. It’s the intersection between being excellent and being unexpected.” [21:29] “There’s just a couple inflection points; moments when we chose to do something remarkable. We went out of our way and it changed everything.” [24:09] “When you have excellence dialed in - when you already know how to do it and it’s a given - it frees you up to use all your brainpower and extra time to really focus on what you can do to be unexpected.” [27:34] “It’s harder now, but that means that it’s more important than ever that you focus on your business. You must really look at how you can be remarkable because if you don’t stand out, you are absolutely going to drown in a sea of supply.” [44:57]   Links: Find Patrick and Rebecca online Sign up for the free Studio Sherpas Webclass Take Muse’s Free Course   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!   Related Episodes: Episode 1: How To Be A Better Storyteller & Why It Matters Episode 83: Why You Need to Understand the Science of Storytelling
If it hasn’t happened already, you’re going to deal with a difficult client. It’s that type of experience that will help you identify your ideal client. Key Takeaways The key to establishing a good working relationship with clients is good communication. Letting them know your process from the start helps avoid disappointment later on.  With the economy the way it is now, look for opportunities that may not have existed otherwise. Be creative. Without lucrative projects out there, work on ones that are enjoyable instead. These opportunities are out there. About The Hamil Bros I’d like to welcome Jacob and Ross Hamil back to the podcast. The Hamil Bros Studio has done incredible work for both small businesses and big brands. They get their creative juices flowing by making promotional video work, short films, and music videos. Serving Your Ideal Clients In this episode, we discuss what an ideal client looks like and how to best serve them. They may already know a thing or two about what they want. However, many clients do not. That’s why education is a large part of the job. It’s taking this extra step to communicate and inform that will set you apart as a business. The Role of Creativity and Perseverance During Tough Times When times seem tough, Ross and Jacob look for value in perseverance and adaptability. When the pandemic hit, they found that just having something to do, even small regular jobs for their church, gave them the purpose they needed to keep going. Staying creatively flexible is the key. As creatives, now can be the time to put those ideas you’ve been sitting on into action. What does your ideal client look like for you? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: How to best help your ideal client [5:45] How to quote a project to a client who knows nothing about video [10:20] Responding to clients who keep changing the scope of your project [17:00] Finding reasons to work on your business during these uncertain times [24:32]   Quotes: “I can tell you within the first five minutes if they’re going to be a big pain in the butt or if it’s going to be a really great relationship.” [11:50] “Once we decide on a budget, we stick with it no matter what. If we choose to add value to it, we will not charge you because that’s not fair to you.” [14:24] “It’s times like these that you can spend a lot of time working on your business and lose all your momentum.” [26:30] “I think we’re pretty much desperate to do what we can to keep doing this instead of having to go take up a day job that makes us miserable.” [31:13]   Links: Storyblocks Get on the Waitlist for the Studio Sherpas Academy Find the Hamil Bros online Follow the Hamil Bros on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!   Related Episodes: Episode 139: How To Navigate The Uncertainty Of Being An Entrepreneur
Having bigger budget clients and making more money sure seems like the thing to do. In reality, it’s not always the best thing for your business. That’s just one of the topics that came up during a recent coaching call with Kenny Morg. In fact, there were so many great nuggets of wisdom in this call that I want to share some of it with you. Deciding if it’s Best to Do a Big Budget Project It might seem logical to assume that bigger budget projects mean making higher quality films and more profit. I’ve found that that’s not always the case. It turns out that there are a lot of other factors to consider here such as the speed of production and the relationships you’ve cultivated. In reality, the quality of human interaction is much more important than the quality of the video. Additionally, you can often make more from a few small jobs with less overhead than a single big-budget project. Setting Expectations with Workshops We go over why I always workshop with clients at the start of any project. It helps establish a budget. It also allows the client to clarify and communicate their vision. I can then guide them to the type of video that will serve them best. With this information, I can be confident that I can deliver what they want, when they want it, for what they’ll pay for it. Building Connections and Staying Happy at Work We also discuss how to leverage existing clients to find new ones. You can’t passively wait for them to make referrals for you. You need to be proactive about it. Once you have a good relationship with a client, ask them to refer business your way. Furthermore, actually get out there and meet the people you’d like to work with.  Video often sells an emotional idea. Consequently, the success of this is difficult to measure. It takes a lot of work to successfully stay in this business. In order to maintain my love of the job, I’m careful to outsource the parts that don’t bring me joy. With that out of the way, I can seek out the parts of the jobs that excite me. This is the key to maintaining a healthy work-life balance. What can you do to focus on the parts of your business that bring you the most joy? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode: Important considerations to have when looking for high budget work [6:00] Workshopping with clients before the start of a project to clarify visions and plans [17:56] How to ask clients to make referrals and bring in more business [27:51] Understanding how your videos do the marketing for you [33:38] The differences between working with agencies versus directly with businesses [35:22] Using social media and YouTube to fuel growth [41:00] Getting expert advice to build a great website [47:27] Maintaining a love of your craft by avoiding burnout [53:40] The key to maintaining a healthy work-life balance [55:25] How to avoid over-checking your inbox [1:01:22]   Quotes:  “The right partner is going to pay you when you’re obviously going above and beyond.” [8:07] “We can’t just sit back and wait for the referrals to come in. We’ll ask our clients for referrals.” [32:58] “We’re storytellers first. We believe that if we can create some kind of emotive connection with the person watching the film, then we have a better chance of getting them to do the thing that we want them to do.” [34:50] “We are typically selling emotion. We’re selling a brand video or story and it’s really hard to measure what the emotional connection is.” [44:02]   Links: Storyblocks 30-day guide to jumpstart your video business The Budget Maximizer The Video Blueprint Method StoryBrand   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Do you feel like you’re running in place on a life-sized hamster wheel or are you living a life of delight? As a business owner and entrepreneur, it might feel like you have a never-ending to-do list to check off. But that’s not why you do what you do. Today, I’m thrilled to have a guest who will help us reframe why we got into this line of work, to begin with. About Amira Alvarez Amira Alvarez has created an amazing brand that makes a huge impact on people’s lives. She is the founder and CEO of The Unstoppable Woman, a global coaching company helping entrepreneurs, empire builders, and rising stars achieve their dreams and goals in record time. Your Business as a Source of Satisfaction Amira draws a direct connection between building and growing a business with personal satisfaction. While some days will naturally be more difficult than others, the goal of running your own business should be to have a good time. It should empower you to live the life you want. It’s easy to fall into the trap of the daily grind. To combat this, Amira urges fellow entrepreneurs to stay focused on the big picture. Recognizing Your Vision For Your Life and Career The fact of the matter is that there are infinite ways to run a business. Too often, entrepreneurs fall into the old paradigms that they know from former jobs. Yet, if you can identify your vision and how you want to show up for your job, you can actively work to create that reality. Amira urges everyone to recognize that they can operate according to their own rules. When this happens, you’ll be able to actually enjoy what you do for a living. Many find that they’re working themselves into the ground. Making more money can help you escape this. The trick is doing it without creating more work that you don’t want to do. This could mean raising your prices, selling more, or adding a new income channel. Before you can do this, you need to believe in yourself and the value of what you do. How is your business leading you towards a life of delight? How can you shift what you do to create a more fulfilling work experience? Tell me in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode  How growing your business can lead to joy and fulfillment [4:10] What happens when your goals become your priorities [11:39] Recognizing the signs that it’s time to shift gears on how you operate [14:53] The realization that you don’t need to run your business according to anyone else’s expectations [23:00] How to escape the trap of over-exhausting yourself [28:30] Building your sense of self-worth as insulation against those who would treat you poorly [36:20]   Quotes “Why grow your own business if it’s not for that sense of personal freedom, excitement, enthusiasm?” [4:24] “Doing the hard things - really stepping up and doing those challenging things that move the needle forward - that makes you feel great!” [13:56] “Who decided that the weekend is the weekend? Who decided that working is from nine to five? If I am excited and thrilled and living a delighted life, who cares? Why do I have to play by the rules?” [26:43] “If you don’t value yourself, if you don’t have a sense of personal self-worth, you will attract people who don’t treat you well.” [36:20]  “Go after your dreams. Own what you really want and go for it.” [42:19]   Links Download the 30-day guide to jumpstart your video business Storyblocks Find Amira Alvarez online Follow Amina on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube | Linkedin The Unstoppable Woman Podcast The Morning Mindset Club The Income Breakthrough Summit Entrepreneurial Operating System IT Cosmetics   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Just because you have a great idea, it doesn’t mean that your customers are going to love it too. They have their own projects and are working on their own schedule. Understanding that your priorities are not the same as your customers’ is key to creating long-term relationships with them.  Jason Fried, a non-serial entrepreneur, is the founder and CEO of Basecamp. He’s co-authored several books including Getting Real, Rework, Remote, and It Doesn’t Have to be Crazy at Work.  As someone who has always loved creating and designing things, Jason started making websites right out of college. Realizing that he preferred working for himself, Jason refocused his career path on creating businesses. He quickly discovered that organization is central to productivity and success, but the tools to make it happen didn’t exist. It was this realization that gave birth to Basecamp. Today, Jason shares some of his revelations from the workplace. A big one was coming to the understanding that not everything is as urgent as we often think it is. This allows us to slow down and get perspective on where our energy should really be going. Basically, we should all be getting a good night’s sleep before acting on anything big. Furthermore, as a leader, you need to create the space for honest and open communication with the people you work with. This means asking the right questions and being open to any answer.  How do you best listen to your customer’s concerns? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode  How necessity can give birth to brilliant business ideas [5:30] The advantages that come from listening to customers instead of making assumptions [9:30] What it really means to treat your customers with care and respect [13:10] The realization that few things are as urgent as we think [17:00] Where to cultivate joy and purpose in the work that you do [23:03] The importance of always asking questions of your team and company [25:10] Why you should look for inspiration outside of your industry [33:30]   Quotes “Constant iteration is the only way to make anything better.” [8:51] “Just because we have something new to offer and we think it’s better, that doesn’t necessarily mean that for other people better is what they’re looking for. A lot of people are looking for consistency and predictability.” [9:58] “A lot of things can wait and they can wait their turn. It’s actually better for things to have to wait their turn because sometimes when you get to them you realize it wasn't that good of an idea anyway.” [18:35] “False urgency is a really dangerous thing. I think a lot of companies suffer from it.” [22:58] “The fundamental thing is that if you want answers you have to ask questions. People don’t bring you answers if you don’t ask questions first.” [27:00]   Links Find Jason Fried online Follow Jason on Twitter Storyblocks Basecamp It Doesn’t Have to be Crazy at Work Remote Rework Getting Real The Rework Podcast Death by Meeting by Patrick Lencioni Know Your Team The Drive Podcast Get your free video business jumpstart guide   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
If you’re not working with the clients and budgets you’d like, the problem may lie in your website. What does the copywriting on it look like? Is it helping your ideal client find you? If not, it’s time to reassess the story you’re telling. Josh Cantrell is the founder of Signal Brandworks, a messaging and copywriting agency that helps people find the right words to sell more. Josh is also a certified Storybrand guide and a Ray Edwards Certified Direct Response copywriter. Josh and I discuss why you need to care about copywriting if your business is to thrive. Proper copywriting is what gets your message across and sets you apart from the competition. It comes down to having the right framework in place. With that established, the right ideas and words will follow. To achieve this, you need to identify what it is that makes you special. We’re each individuals with unique qualities. Making that your brand will automatically distinguish yourself. That being said, don’t focus on yourself. Instead, make the focus on what your clients receive from you. How can you make your clients the heroes of their own stories? Let’s talk in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Why videographers should care about copywriting Establishing the right frameworks for creating successful copy What it takes to make a clear and compelling website How to turn your copy into a compelling story Being clear on what you don’t do as well as what you love to do   Quotes “If you have the right framework, then the ideas come a lot better. And once you have the ideas, then the words can come a lot better.” [8:25] “The harder it is to understand and work through the words on your website, the less likely they’re going to stay and do business with you.” [17:35] “You, yourself, are the brand. You are different from everybody else out there. The way that you talk about what you do is going to be different from the way that other people talk about what they do.” [18:16] “If you get the right words, the right clients will fall through the cracks onto them.” [34:01]   Links Find Josh Cantrell online Storybrand Building a Storybrand by Donald Miller Storyblocks Join the waitlist for the Video Business Academy   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
Have you ever had a project become bigger than it’s supposed to? I know I have. It’s cost me time, money, and sanity. This is scope creep and it’s incredibly common. Fortunately, I’ve learned (the hard way) to avoid it. It's fine to go that extra mile for your clients. It’s great to give them more than they expect. But if you don’t have healthy boundaries, you risk getting taken advantage of. Your client should be honoring your time and effort by paying you for it, Supposed “small tweaks” and “just a little thing” become time wasters. Most of us can’t work for free. It can be tough to say no to a seemingly small ask. Yet, it’s crucial to respect yourself as well as your clients. Knowing when to do something extra for a client while also prioritizing your own needs is a difficult tightrope to walk.  Over the years, I’ve found ways to avoid scope creep. Being clear on who the project owner is and thoroughly explaining your process will help. Even explaining from the start that scope creep will mean extra charges can help to prevent it from happening.  Has scope creep taken over one of your projects? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode What scope creep is and why it happens to everyone What to watch out for when doing work for friends and family Why your own priorities are never to be ignored Simple tips to prevent scope creep before it becomes an issue What to do once the project has grown beyond what it should   Quotes “You should overdeliver. You should be kind to your clients. You should let them experience the huge value that you bring. But what you also should do is have boundaries.” [4:13] “If you want to go the extra mile, do that. But in those cases, make sure you’re letting them know.” [15:19] “I’ve been fortunate enough to hear from a lot of different people who have been using the ASCEND Method over the past few years who have landed huge jobs and have had a lot of success because they have a process now; they have confidence in these meetings.” [20:12]   Links Learn the ASCEND Method here!   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
What would you choose to do if you had to completely shift your life? Would you focus on your true calling? All too often our jobs get in the way of our dreams. This is a shame because what you do for work has all the potential to align with your higher calling. But it’s up to you to intentionally create this. Today, I’m thrilled to be joined by Ira Davis, one of the original Studio Sherpas students. As a former Marine Corps drill instructor, the founder and CEO of DreamDiver and IV I II Studios, Ira works to help people discover their stories and inspire others. His companies are designed to help aspiring pioneers, visionaries, and world-changers discover their purpose and dive into their dreams to impact the world.  As filmmakers, we are uniquely positioned to share our vision with the world. At the same time, we often get sidetracked creating for others. There’s nothing inherently wrong with this. We all have to earn an income and keep our businesses running. However, ignoring your own visions means that you risk sharing with the world with your own special vision and genius.  Ira passionately explains what happens when you create from the soul, rather than from some material need. If you commit to this, you’ll find that your work resonates deeper with the right audiences. It will lead to more fulfilling opportunities down the road. Throughout this conversation, we reevaluate what success means. Being able to put food on the table is one type. So is fulfilling the mission that you feel called to do. Ira explains how these two don’t need to be exclusive of each other. Turning your dream into a livelihood isn’t easy, but the rewards are beyond priceless What is your dream? How can you take your business there? Let’s chat in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Deciding how you truly want to show up with your lens Balancing the needs of making money with fulfilling your dream vision Having bigger dreams for yourself and your video business Recognizing that income stops your impact Why inspiration is more powerful than motivation What happens when you build your company on a dream that’s bigger than yourself   Quotes “There’s never been a better time in the history of our lives where we have the time to stop moving at one hundred miles an hour to focus on who we have been called to be and what we have been called to do and create.” [3:05] “If you get the opportunity to do this, you are playing the infinite game. The finite game is money. The infinite game is transforming and moving people’s hearts and souls. Now, and even after I’m dead, will this thing live on?” [18:55] “When you dream bigger than yourself, it will attract people who want to join you and push it to the stratosphere.” [23:59] “Just because you have the purpose to create great content, doesn't mean that you’re the content creator.” [40:59] “A person without a dream is a person without direction for their life. If you don’t have a dream, where are you going?” [46:53]   Links Find Ira Davis online Follow Ira on Twitter | Instagram | Facebook IV I II Studios: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook Play Bigger Evolved Enterprise by Yanick Silver The Infinite Game by Simon Sinek Get on the waitlist for the Video Business Academy!   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!
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Podcast Details

Created by
Ryan Koral
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Aug 1st, 2016
Latest Episode
Jan 11th, 2021
Release Period
Weekly
Episodes
214
Avg. Episode Length
About 1 hour
Explicit
No
Order
Episodic
Language
English

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