Insider Interviews

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When David Cohen joined the IAB as President, the US was two weeks into stay-at-home mandates. While that may have curtailed in-person conferences the industry association is known for, it upped the focus on all things digital. Not long after, the ante was also upped for Cohen personally when he was named CEO following the 14 year run of Randall Rothenberg. Pressure? Not to hear Cohen, who has helmed major agency divisions and had $20B in media spending under his purview during his days at MAGNA and UM. But pandemic-influenced strategy changes? Definitely. In support of its mission to “empower the media and marketing industries to thrive in the digital economy” – let alone during a COVID economy -- Cohen has “brought an unprecedented number of industry captains into their leadership councils and transformed the timeliness of their strategic initiatives.” Those words from Rothenberg’s commendation of Cohen on his promotion sparked a song from me. Of course. No one is safe. But that didn’t curtail a compelling conversation about more serious matters, such as Cohen telling me about the advantages that came with adapting to the digital world as early as the 90’s and how he – and the IAB overall – are continuing to innovate with today’s current technologies for marketers. I also put Cohen in the same hot seat he put recent panelists in when moderating a Reach Conference talk himself, asking what he would most like to see fixed in our current digital eco-sphere. Cohen moderating Reach Conference panel We also discuss: Cohen’s A-ha! Moment – from the Yellow Pages! The lessons he learned after joining the IAB family that every marketing agency should know "Pulse studies" on changes in consumer consumption trends to media buyers/seller polls The IAB’s Brand Disruption Summit How to navigate through your Brand and Demand goals The shift in how digital engagement is being accomplished How IAB is helping in pushing cross-platform forward Like his friend and recent Insider Interviews guest, Carl Fremont, Cohen has a pro-social personal mission. Hear how he -- and ANA's Bill Tucker -- are helping push support of disadvantaged children. Resources Mentioned: 2020 IAB Brand Disruption Summit Partnership with Children Social Media Links: David Cohen LinkedIn IAB on Twitter IAB, IAB Tech Lab Insider Interviews is on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Please share the podcast and share how smart you are about media, marketing and advertising! To reach out to be considered for an episode or suggest questions or a guest — or to have your own bespoke podcast series produced and/or hosted by E.B. Moss -- email podcasts@mossappeal.com. We’re “hear” for you!
Sean Cunningham is the son of a radio personality and the husband of grammarian. That may be why he expresses himself so fluidly and works hard to offer clear explanations about the video landscape at the same time. Those personal aspects combined with deep professional experience in the ad industry and as a strategic media advisor help him helm the VAB, the source for insights-driven research and thought leadership about premium video. As its president and CEO, Sean is laser-focused on maximizing outcomes and championing the medium as a must-have for building high-value brands and driving growth. It’s not easy in our changing environment, but the mantra at the organization is to simplify what is a very complex ecosystem and offer insights that help all those in the business of video to thrive. They've kept up a steady pace of conferences and reports even during trying times, even as consumers have made a steady diet of video during these at-home days. In Episode 19 of Insider Interviews, Sean tells host E.B. Moss about the definition and best practices around marketing with premium video (spoiler alert: the VAB defines it as multi-screen content that's professionally produced programming in any form -- linear, tablet, laptop, mobile, etc.). Sean and E.B. also discuss: Our radio dads!...and what happens around Sean's dinner table... The lessons he learned on the agency side that all media sellers should know The role of media in building your brand during the COVID-19 pandemic The power of including authentic messaging around diversity & inclusion VAB and IAB - important bedfellows The changes in consumer habits that marketers need to consider How to put your best foot forward to advance a career in this industry. Resources Mentioned: thevab.com IAB Social Media Links: Twitter - VAB Sean Cunningham LinkedIn Please share the podcast if you liked this episode, and follow Insider Interviews on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. You can also reach out to be considered for an episode — or suggest questions or a guest — or to have your own bespoke podcast series produced and/or hosted by E.B. Moss. Email us at podcasts@mossappeal.com. We're “hear” for you!
Andrea Palmer, now President of Publicis Health Media (PHM) has wanted to be in Healthcare Marketing since her college days despite the field not always getting credit for being dynamic or embracing creativity. With PHM's reputation for having their “finger on the pulse” (sorry), she’s proven those perceptions wrong and inspired many to follow or stick to the healthcare marketing path. In Episode 18 of Insider Interviews, in which I perhaps sing again (umm, twice, I’m just sayin’) Palmer clearly demonstrates just how creative and important messaging around healthcare can and should be. It's certainly an area that’s very top of mind with us all these days and Palmer makes it digestible. You’ll pick up on why she rose through the ranks quickly at PHM -- the strategic media planning and buying agency within PHCG, and the only global media agency solely dedicated to the health and wellness space. This industry trailblazer of nearly 20 years shares what’s currently happening in the healthcare media space, along with some interesting projections from PHM's prescient “Disruptors List.” Get the insider scoop on what inspiring innovations emerged from the “Shark Tank”-type element of their industry-convening Health Front, and what we should be concerned about. Palmer is determined to ensure the right information is getting out there and helped drive home PHM’s mission to equip brands AND people with the tools and communications they need to make healthy decisions. We learn why it’s important to create content with conscience and why brands need to listen to other voices than their own. What we talked about: What’s happening in healthcare marketing How a childhood illness put Palmer on the path to healthcare...and college led her to marketing Health trends and disruptors How PHM markets to consumers who’re apprehensive about embracing telehealth How PHM helps its clients with being ‘the resource’ instead of Dr. Google Defining the concept of Content with a Conscience Facing down racism: communicating to diverse audiences and not just “to the mean” How Palmer is advising her clients on approaches to ensure that health message is communicated well and heard by all cohorts and communities Thinking about the bigger picture Pushing for innovation in the health realm The future of healthcare And yes, I find a reason to close with a song...again.   Follow Andrea on Social Media LinkedIn Publicis Health Media LinkedIn Publicis Health Media Facebook  Resources mentioned in the episode PHM: Publicis Health Media Health Front 2020 The Healthcare Industry’s Big Disruptors
Marissa Solis was about six months in to a big new role at one of the biggest snack companies in the world when one of the world's biggest crisis hit. That's not hyperbole. As the new head of all marketing initiatives, media, sports, and partnerships for the core brands of Frito-Lay North America, including Doritos, Cheetos, Tostitos, and dips, it was definitely not hyperbole. That was Marissa's new reality and she had to help smoothly and quickly do the equivalent of turning a battleship. But this dynamo had previously been tapped to lead the creation of a cross-functional Hispanic Business Unit at PepsiCo and had helped double beverage sales among U.S. Hispanic consumers in a short time, so she was the right woman to face down a pandemic. Her throughline -- and recipe for success? It always has to start with the consumer. In Episode 17 Marissa explains her whirlwind responsibilities, the massive changes facing brands today, and how those Frito-Lay brands speak to specific audiences. We also talk about how COVID-19 has impacted campaigns from a Super Bowl sponsorship to a new direct to consumer approach. This is a great reminder for brands about the need to engage with consumers where they are. And right now, that is at home...with a pro-social commitment to community. For example, a big Cinco de Mayo campaign was planned and poised to roll out to retail...and instead quickly became Salsa for Cinco benefitting the Hispanic community -- which has  been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. Listen to the evolution of the #AmplifyBlackVoices campaign which included letting PepsiCo ad space be used instead by Black artists to showcase their work. There's much to digest in this episode! So grab a bag of chips, click play, and enjoy! What also talked about: The importance of being agile in today's marketing world Pivoting to the direct to consumer space The “Pantry Stock Phenomenon” The different personalities of Frito-Lay brands Today's marketing renaissance Details on the benefits of Salsa for Cinco and #AmplifyBlackVoices campaigns PepsiCo’s commitment to diversity and inclusion in the workplace Engaging consumers where they are How Marissa and her family adjusted to the new normal! Follow Marissa: Linkedin @Marissa Solis Resources Mentioned: www.snacks.com Salsa For Cinco with Mario And Courtney Lopez Doritos Amplifies Black Voices @mossappeal
Tom Webster, SVP of Edison Research, describes his job as "telling the stories of numbers." He definitely make numbers come alive, and he's a great storyteller overall. So you’re generally okay with Tom as your guest if you didn’t discuss podcast topics in advance. My industry acquaintance may be self-effacing, but he has a steel trap mind for the insights Edison regularly uncovers about all things audio, and he shared quite a few in our ad hoc but fascinating conversation for  Insider Interviews. The custom market research company helmed by Larry Rosin may be best known as the sole providers of exit polling data during U.S. elections, but Tom is best known for his big research reveals on webinars (now Zoom presentations) or at conferences. Research junkies lean in to hear which platform has the biggest “share of ear” and how differently are consumers engaging with Alexa. Basically, he’s the go-to guy for sharing and interpreting our evolving involvement with radio, podcasting, voice...even IoT and our social media habits. As Tom describes it, “I make sure that the data that we collect on behalf of our clients is understood contextualized, put into action and valued, and that people come back for more.” Here’s what’s “more” about Tom and a topline of our discussion: Little known fact? Tom likes words as well as numbers. This former English Lit professor is also the principal author of some widely cited studies and the co-author of The Infinite Dial, America's longest-running research series on digital media consumption, and The Mobile Commerce Revolution. In Episode 16, Tom shares some insider scoop from Edison's audio research – and his considered POV on the current state of radio broadcasting and the growth of podcasting (including some tips that can help you grow your own podcast). [00:01 – 03:25] Opening Segment More about Tom Webster, his role in Edison Research and a moving from academia to a marketing career [03:26 – 17:20] The Insider Scoop on Audio Research About Edison Research's broader offerings – like that exit poll and vote count data – and Tom’s area of focus: Audio More insider scoop from Tom WebsterVoice vs. Audio The growth of "smart speakers." Where are we – if anywhere -- with an FM chip for mobile phones? The general state of radio The uptake on podcasting (Joe Rogan notwithstanding) Tom talks about some Edison partnerships (and E.B. held back “insider” jokes about her old boss, John Rosso of Triton Digital!) [17:21 – 25:40] Diverse Voices The diversity in podcast listeners and podcast content Growing your podcast in today’s competitive market: Having a distinct voice Showing your unique, distinct point of view How Tom is sharing HIS unique POV, via his own newsletter I Hear Things [25:41 – 31:27] Closing Segment Tom's go-to resource gathering platforms Feedly Twitter The Tom and Tamsen team: "freenoting"with his wife, Tamsen Webster Final thoughts     E.B. and Tom on the first (last?) VOICE panel at CES 1/20 Resources Mentioned: Find Your Red Thread with Tamsen Webster The Top 30 U.S. Podcasts Q2 2020 article by Edison Research Podcast Consumer Tracker The Joe Rogan Experience National Public Radio iHeartRadio TuneIn The Infinite Dial Triton Digital The Smart Audio Report The Spoken Word Audio Report Latino Podcast Listener Report Lake Wobegon Effect You can connect with Tom on LinkedIn and Twitter. Subscribe to his I Hear Things newsletter. Listen to The Freenoter with Tom Webster and Tamsen Webster. Follow Edison Research on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram. You can also visit their website https://www.edisonresearch.com/ Please share the podcast if you liked this episode, and Follow Insider Interviews on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. And reach out to be considered for an episode -- or suggest questions or a guest --...
Michael Smith joined National Public Radio as chief marketing officer at a time when the nation -- and the world -- had just entered crisis mode. In addition to adapting to his new job he’s needed to shift the company’s marketing message, outreach and the very stance the brand has taken over the past years. Part of that shift was motivated by more digital audio listening given more at-home workers during our pandemic. The parallel motivation was to amplify more multicultural voices and drive greater diversity within the halls of the company itself.  In Episode 15, Michael shares his observations, his approach and some insider scoop from his winged-back chair in New Jersey. For example, he explains how different audiences respond to NPR's content. Michael tells us that "among regular users when we look at people of color versus white listeners, their satisfaction levels are actually higher. So it's an exciting thing in the sense that if we can get more people to know that we're there and to get us into their consideration set, when they come, I think they're going to love it."  Michael had primarily been focused on network video, developing strategies to reach younger and more diverse audiences on streaming platforms for Cooking Channel, and Food Network -- where he and I worked together during the last big crisis for the country, 9/11! He has quickly learned to apply his know-how to linear radio and on demand audio. "When they start to know some of these shows where there are young, diverse hosts, a Sam Sanders or [they get to know the] hosts of Pop Culture Happy Hour, that creates so much more engagement than when they just see the three block letters, NPR.” The fast 35-minute discussion includes suggestions all brands can appreciate from a world-class marketer like Michael Smith. We talked about: The challenges most media companies are facing right now How to move from linear to on demand streaming digital platforms Balancing linear, podcasting and the NPR One app How has Coronavirus Daily evolved as a show...and the ongoing need for that content? How NPR itself has evolved since its origins in the 60s, and why its signature audio style is intentionally like a mental “exhale” Working with the sponsorship team, NPM Michael's optimism -- and any pessimism -- for the future. Follow Michael on LinkedIn. Follow NPR on Twitter. Follow Insider Interviews on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. And reach out to be considered for an episode or for your own bespoke podcast series produced and/or hosted by E.B. Moss.  Michael's "studio" chair
This episode is made up of two discussions about podcasting: A casual conversation with RAIN News president, Brad Hill around fun moments from the industry and projections for its success... and a more formal discussion -- actually a few segments grabbed from RAIN's Global Podcast Leadership Summit. Insider Interviews host, E.B. Moss was the moderator on a panel about podcast advertising, featuring Art19's Lex Friedman and Targetspot's Dave Sosson -- and a few of their insights were captured here. You'll learn how the summit had to pivot -- and lessons for good zooming -- as well as: the kinds of media categories that podcasters are selling against -- think paid social -- and how they compare; how host read ads are great, but how do they fit in to a targeted buy  Interesting projections from the IAB and the new categories opening up for -- and of -- podcast advertisers SHOULD there be a "PAB"  And what is "giide"? NOTE: Read RainNews.com to catch more takeaways from all the 8 sessions of the recent summit. And ask E.B. about using giide.fm for your media company!  
Get the "insider scoop" on how to dive in to creating a place in the podcasting world. The talented Juleyka Lantigua-Williams, Founder/CEO of Lantigua Williams & Co., an award-winning and Peabody-nominated digital media studio, walked us through her anxiety through her achievements. While she's humble enough to just describe herself as someone who builds teams that create podcasts, those teams have turned out hit after hit in three short years. But Lantigua-Williams has the chops, from 20 years of experience as a writer, reporter, editor, syndicated columnist, book editor/scout, lecturer, and audio producer! The differentiator for this company? Its mission to support and amplify the creators and stories "from the margins" - which often means by and about women of color. These shows include Latina to Latina, which just passed 100 episodes, 70 Million, and Feeling My Flo. But Lantigua-Williams also does consulting and white-label production services for clients like Macmillan Podcasts (Driving the Green Book), the Phi Beta Kappa Society, WHYY, KQED, and Civil Beat. Another secret weapon for success is Juleyka's authenticity and generosity. She's set a tone of sharing -- which you'll hear candidly in this conversation and can read in her posts on the company site and elsewhere, like this very guide to "centering marginalized people in your podcast." Listen and learn the ins and outs of producing a show and starting a company as Juleyka shares her knowledge and expertise including: How Juleyka embraces her BFF, named "Insomnia", and sidekick, Perfectionism The path from intern to producer to company founder - as a "hyphenated American" The first step to starting any company Staying true to Juleyka's vision for her company How some shows came about (umm, conversations around astronauts menstruating in space?) and upcoming projects Supporting women of color Getting to "scale" and getting revenue Follow on Social Media Twitter @JuleykaLantigua LinkedIn Twitter @LanWilCo   Resources mentioned: Lantigua Williams & Co Podcasting Seriously Truth be Told by Tanya Moseley  
Back in January I had the good fortune to get seated next to someone I’ve long admired -- Carl Fremont -- on our return flight from CES. If you’ve been to CES you know it’s non-stop learning about what’s trending. And my non-stop flight next to Carl made for even more learning as we recapped what we’d each just experienced, and then he was kind enough to share his own projections for the future of the media and advertising industry. I immediately understood why Quigley-Simpson had made Carl CEO just months before. So, for this episode of Insider Interviews I asked him to share a lot of those thoughts so more people outside of row 8 could benefit from his insights. Carl has held senior roles in the media/marketing industry for decades, and explained how his longest tenure – 16 years with Lester Wunderman – gave him skills that are still applicable today. Hear how the former Chief Digital Officer for MEC and Chief Media Officer for Digitas describes direct marketing and performance marketing, and the importance of brands optimizing every channel possible – including how to capitalize on eCommerce. Long an advocate of supporting women and diversity in the industry, Carl discusses how this transformative time is also a time to embrace change in order to evolve and benefit business. He shares a moving story of his own diverse background and how a discovery of his father’s past dovetails with his own unique hobby tied to vintage radios. We are all fortunate that Carl loves sharing knowledge, and listeners will benefit from priceless marketing and advertising advice. And yes, I found an opportunity or two to sing to him.... Please listen – and share – Carl Fremont’s thoughts on advertising trends, common brand pitfalls and diversity including: Is “direct marketing” different from DTC? How the pandemic accelerated the emergence of alternative channels for businesses Creating a harmonious consumer experience What you can do to speed up purchasing path Authenticity: How to build it and what it truly means Mistakes brands make and how you can avoid them The pros and cons of third-party eCommerce platforms Considerations for building your own eCommerce platform The holistic approach to promoting your brand What omnichannel really means Influencers: Does scale matter here? Diverse creative staff to reflect diverse consumers How mentoring benefits companies – and oneself. Social Media Links: Linkedin @carlfremont Quigley-Simpson Twitter @Quigley_Simpson Resources mentioned in the episode Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay (1998) by Lester Wunderman Quotes "We've been practicing direct to consumer skills since our founding. We just didn't call it "DTC". "Direct marketing" does not mean you abandoned brand." -Carl Fremont “We need to always make sure that we’re giving opportunities, that we’re mentoring, that we’re helping to grow the industry with a more diverse background.” -Carl Fremont “I love looking back and looking forward. I believe a lot of lessons can be obtained about moving forward from looking back.” -Carl Fremont Carl Fremont's father's radio
Normally I come out with a new episode of "Insider Interviews" every Thursday, but did you know that I also have another podcast? It's sort of my personal passion project and it's called "It's Quite a Living", and it's with "my friends in high places". They're really casual conversations about some high profile people who happen to be my friends. Now, that one comes out every other Tuesday. So I've decided to make "Insider Interviews" -- the B2B one speaking with those in media marketing and advertising -- come out every other Thursday...at least through the summer. Of course, if an eager sponsor* wants me to produce more frequently bring it on! Otherwise, you'll hear Episode 11 NEXT Thursday. Frankly, it's been a LOT to create, host and post two podcasts a week, even though I love it -- especially during our current times, and especially since I seem to be developing a reputation for singing to my guests. Listeners understand that.... But do stay subscribed because you won't want to miss the CEO of Quigley Simpson, Carl Fremont, who will be my very interesting next guest! And now you have some time in between to catch up on the past 10 episodes with amazing folks like Minjae Ormes of Visible, Claude Silver of Vayner Media, Sree Sreenivasan (don't miss his #NYTimesReadalong on Sundays!), Rachael Henke of Dell Technologies, and guests from NYI, Tidal Wave Productions, Krantz Media and more! I'm very, very proud of what we've been able to do together to bring you great content about the industry. And I really appreciate all of the great ratings you've given me and the subscribing and sharing. You can listen just about anywhere you like (although Pandora is still a hold out, I'm just sayin'.) Thank you for telling everyone in the industry. It means a lot to me. *And, if you want to sponsor an episode of EITHER podcast, or suggest a guest for "Insider Interviews", please reach out at podcasts@mossappeal.com. I'm "hear" for you! E.B.
My work is creating content that drives change. Mostly for businesses. But I have always shared my perspective through content: journalism, blogs, podcasts -- even just journaling. I had to balance the "best practices" of regularity in my podcast publishing schedule, with bigger things in mind. The crisis in America. I only had Tuesday available to record for this week, which was #BlackOutTuesday. And, on top of that, today - the Thursday I publish -  is also the memorial for a martyr to racism, George Floyd.  If you - as most listeners to this podcast - work in media, marketing or advertising, chances are you know of Minjae Ormes. Most recently global head of partnerships for YouTube, and for the past couple of years chief marketing officer of disruptive phone service from Verizon, Visible. She personally has been visible for her innovative, and appropriately "disruptive" approaches to marketing the new service, but more recently she's been seen in various trades and on panels describing how they've embraced broadcast TV campaigns for the first time. That said, Minjae is also widely respected as a mentor to women in business, and a role model as leader. E.B. and Minjae Ormes after our first interview in 2019 Her thoughtful comments - both in this interview as well as in sharing more of her personal journey the first time I interviewed her in March of 2019 -- on learning to adapt to new cultures and countries are as insightful as her marketing approaches are. So, since she made the time for me on her actual birthday this week, we made sure to discuss not just her shift from event marketing to mass media, etc., but -- like in my last episode with Sree Sreenivasan -- the absolute need to embrace empathy in our professional and personal paths. I think you'll get her tone from this quote: "How do we first and foremost create the kinds of experiences that people expect now across the industry? Just the simplicity, the seamlessness, but also the humanity with which you show up as a brand and a business." She also explains their pandemic pivot: "going into April, our traffic and some of the KPIs were actually picking right back up, which told us that phone services are one of those things that people rely on, no matter what happens, if not more so now. It's been an interesting exercise, both in listening, but also... as all of us as marketers can't really do create a production the way we used to it created spaces for us to think about what's old is new and new is old again, and different ways to ultimately listen to consumers and what they're telling us implicitly and explicitly for us to follow their lead." Another visible difference in Minjae's approach? Making a difference in people's lives. Literally. Hear her description of their pro-social campaign, #VisibleActsofKindness, and the story of one customer that moved her most, plus how they supported volunteers forced to immediately return from Peace Corps volunteering. A final note, while Visible's difference is that it has no brick and mortar locations, many of its parent company retail stores were looted and stripped bare during protests this week. Verizon also just donated $10 million to social justice organizations, including the Urban League and NAACP. So to honor the legacy of necessary change that we will hopefully learn from the death of Floyd, I am publishing on his memorial date so these words might inspire some to consider how they listen, and how they market to all people, with respect.   https://www.facebook.com/GLBLCTZN/videos/3013614902067591/  
As we crave connection during these isolating times, Sree Sreenivasan has stepped up to bring people around the world together, sometimes several times a day. While almost 80 straight days in a row of recording his Global COVID-19 show drove his family to furlough him from his own home during livestreaming hours, this social and digital media expert, known by many as “@Sree”, has an expanded family of connections that faithfully gather round for a dose of positivity. And every Sunday, they tune-in again for his New York Times “readalong,” now five years running, with his own scintillating and scholarly guests perusing the paper and op-eds alongside him. So, that's 80 days in a row and literally twice on Sunday. Did I mention his 21 years of conducting Social Media Weekend gatherings to educate on the latest tools and tactics? How about his frequent appearances on radio, or CNBC as a tech-expert? Hear why this the former chief digital officer for The Metropolitan Museum of Art is now focused on the art of generous content both altruistically and, candidly, as a business development vehicle for his digital marketing and virtual event business. Less generous, perhaps, in his opinion of social ISSUES, Sree’s stories – from adjusting to new countries and his quirky love of comic strip Calvin and Hobbes to how he adopted new communication tactics to connect people through every crisis of the past two decades – are equally passionate. The throughline is also his ardent belief in journalistic integrity, veracity and humanism. We joke about how his livestreams and social sharing are the perfect outlet for a man who likes to talk, but with Sree, people want to listen. He’s learned the art of that, too. Listen to the inaugural Marshall Loeb visiting professor at Stonybrook University, and former Columbia University journalism professor,  Sree Sreenivasan, and you’ll hear why. We also discuss: His humble and sometimes humiliating path to acculturating to America The evolution and promise of his Global COVID-19 Show How reading the New York Times out loud on Facebook Live become bigger than he could have imagined How he competes with – or defers to his wife, Roopa How that love for Calvin and Hobbes has played a role in his life
The world of comic books and graphic novels is serious fun. Meaning, both serious and fun. From a serious shift in the revenue model as paper product has gone digital and the edutainment factor of non-fiction hand-drawn histories, to the wildly wicked fantasies spawned by Barbarella type heroines to fictionalized lives of heroes among us.  Darren G. Davis, president of one of the leading producers of both the serious and the fun books, TidalWave Productions, made a spontaneous appearance for Episode 8 of Insider Interviews with E.B. Moss – who was actually his former boss at the start of his career in entertainment, and now counts herself as a friend to the seriously funny founder! In an office surrounded by framed super heroes, acquired during his days at DC Comics, and signed comic book covers from his biographical spins on everyone from Hillary Clinton to Barbara Walters, Davis both reminisced about our days at E! and his path forward from there, dished the dirt, and shared breaking news of stranger than fiction comics to come. Hint: Thought you’d heard the last of Stormy Daniels?.... Davis described the evolution of some of the iconic titles he’s created or developed over the past 20 years, including the top-selling “10th Muse” for Image Comics, and the niche he carved out in the fiction world via successful collaborations with iconic larger than life real characters ranging from William Shatner (Star Trek) and Adam West (Batman), to Vincent Price, William Nolan (Logan's Run), Roger Corman, and now even the infamous Tiger King! Listen for some of these moments, but it’s a breezy 35-minutes and you’ll want to hear all the fairly unfiltered anecdotes of this side of the content business: 03:45 Leveraging an E! internship to a network ad sales career to marketing “B” movies (including his first encounter with Leprechaun the movie, which made its way years later into a comic book) to repping artists -- and how it all came together to create a new career; 08:00: From the muse of Olivia Newton John to learning to love the WWF 09:30: The difference between a comic book and a graphic novel :11:40: Phone messages from Batman and making misadventures for Adam West 13:00: How Julie Newmar ended up back in time as Catwoman meets super-secret spy 15:25: How to wear multiple hats and learn to pivot as a manager 17:10: How to calm the tempest of Stormy Daniels’ angry manager (or lawyer) and wind up as friends – and business partners 20:25: Turing women ranging from Condoleezza, and Sarah to Hillary and Stormy into a female force series (Hint: listen here for the breaking news!) to showcase the positivity in what they've accomplished – and the inspiration for it from the master, Stan Lee; 23:15: The origins and value of comic books as educational – and taking a non-partisan stance, even when drawing on Obama to Bush; 27:25: How Nook and Google and other platforms fill in the pages of lost print ads 29:00: A not so serious discussion of fantasy super powers 30:20 A serious discussion of celebrations and creations during COVID times 33:00: The evolution of a “best worst idea”... twice And...best ending ever? Davis pays tribute to Moss as SuperMentor. PS: You heard this here first, too: He promises to put me in a comic some day!
Phrases with the word “heart” in them are too many to count; it’s our most treasured reference as it aligns with love, soul, happiness...basically anything positive (unless tied to “attack”.) But tie it to “Silver” and you have a whole added meaning for positivity, because then you’re talking about Claude Silver, Chief Heart Officer of VaynerMedia, a full service digital agency "built for the now." It’s a fairly unique title, but trust media trend-shaper Gary Vaynerchuk (AKA Gary Vee) to assign that role to his “number two” person. And so, I couldn’t help but bookend my podcast interview with Silver with a serenade, because her actual job is to encourage "courageous conversations" to ensure the whole company works towards the goals of empathy, heart, speed, hustle, and winning. Silver’s background in positive psychology and leadership positions in strategy at leading ad agencies in the US and UK make her uniquely qualified to inspire healthy attitudes at work, among all people, and encourage transparency. With that mindset, I braved a tune or two, but in between asked some serious questions. Here are the time codes and topics we covered, but I encourage you to hear all the parts in between, because, as the song goes, one is silver and the other’s gold: 5:50: Silver describes a day in her life as the person in charge of “people and experience” 7:20: The difference between classic “HR” and the VaynerMedia approach 10:30: How to “scale culture” 13:00: The VaynerMedia difference versus other agency holding companies 17:00: What VaynerMedia looks for in candidates 19:00: Ageism – at Vayner? In the industry overall? 21:30: Career Pivots 25:35: Silver’s suggestions for brands in a COVID-19 world – and beyond 31:30: Silver’s (s)heroes and thoughts on leadership 35:10: Personal thoughts on parenting today And, you might want to fast-forward starting at 36:30, because that’s where I sing to Silver again....
Rachael Henke’s short title is just “brand” at Dell Technologies. Her formal title is long, but it’s a big job, for a big company: Director of Global Brand Advertising Content and Customer Engagement Storytelling. That means, per Henke, “everything we do is to elevate the brand.” While most everyone has heard of “Dell,” her job is to ensure everyone knows the larger entity – created from the merger with EMC some three years ago -- is actually “Dell Technologies” and that it’s gone from primarily computers to being “an end to end essential technology partner”. While computers are, as Henke says, “still a very critical part of our business, we really want to focus [on the] B2B space, showing how we’re driving innovation and emerging technologies across areas like cloud storage and AI.” For Henke, that means that while being part of the brand team for a 150,000-person global company is impressive enough, she’s also, necessarily, a woman who can use “hyperconverged infrastructure solutions” in a sentence. But it’s still a human-oriented brand, evidenced from top-down actions like Michael Dell donating $100 million dollars to pro social initiatives during our current COVID-19 crisis. So, in Episode 6 of Insider Interviews, Henke explains how her team approaches brand storytelling – turning complicated offerings into human-oriented content. Here’s a topline of our conversation, edited for clarity: “Every day is different”:  Henke’s days involve “conversations about what products are going to launch... and how that will turn into the vision where we're going... a lot of conversations around messaging and with customers to understand how our technology gets used.” Applying Those Conversations To Content: Like TV spots that take the figurative (“is your business going in circles?”) and make it literal, like spokesperson/actor Jeffrey Wright going in circles and upstairs and coming back to the starting point, their B2B brand campaigns aim to showcase how they deliver on solutions, what’s innovative, “and connecting that solution to work for sales teams, too...And If there's a consumer campaign that works really well, it provides lift to our business side as well.” That applies to small business as well: One example is working with ad agency MediaCom and audio company Entercom to create a virtual podcast conference, The PodFerence, to spotlight podcasts on relevant topics for customers. Rinse and Repeat: Henke names brands and marketers she “keeps an eye on” and describes  her own goals to balance creative and data: “One of the challenges that any brand marketer has is how the heck do you measure brand advertising, because you're not necessarily tied to a click, a call, a transactional sale. So we do a lot of measurement ...and also make sure we're not just looking at data in a silo [but working together with other divisions.]” The Media and Marketing for Tomorrow: Will one of the world’s largest tech companies continue to put budget in linear? Henke is bullish on balancing linear and digital, especially when it comes to now on paused live sports. “It’s really timely to ask that because we are a PGA sponsor and have Dell Technologies Match Play which was supposed to take place in March. But I still feel like sponsorships will still be something strong and that we will continue because let's face it, people want sports more than ever.”  We’re looking at continuing with linear, but figuring out where are people still watching? I think CTV and On Demand will absolutely be part of that mix as well. For the future? “We truly believe that because of what has happened globally companies are looking at how they digitally transform in a way that makes sense, but also in a practical way. ...We want to make sure that our brand is there to be that partner for our customers as they need to make changes because the world will be different. Balance and Togetherness: Balance – between divisions as well as between work and ho...
Those tracking the uptake of podcasting, such as Triton, Edison Research and Podtrac, have encouraged advertisers to embrace the medium, especially since it hit critical mass of 100 million+ monthly listeners! But what about brands who want their OWN podcast for B2B purposes? In 15 minutes I’ll walk you through the WHY and the HOW of creating a B2B podcast for your company. And if you’re still overwhelmed let me know and we’ll handle it all for you! Here’s the scoop and the Episode 5 topline: Why a B2B podcast? You have to be everywhere your customer may be, including in their ears, even if you’re speaking to a vendor, an agency or a potential new hire. “Picture a company’s most savvy seller whispering about a value proposition in the prospect’s ear”! Humanize an executive to drive trust and transparency Leverage the best platform for explanatory journalism! Attract employees by painting an audio picture of the company environment, like Xandr did with their Unsponsored Content show, or provide a thought-provoking platform to spotlight divisions or clients, such as the Floor 9 podcast from IPG Media Lab does! Caveats: Expectations should be managed: this is a longtail marketing tactic with a limited pool of listeners Start with the strategy! WHO do you want to have listen? WHY? WHAT with your content me? As Gimlet Managing Director, Matt Lieber, was cited, “What makes for a successful branded podcast are a lot of the things that make for a successful podcast period. If a brand wants to make a commercial that’s 20 minutes long, it will fail.” The What: Most B2B podcasts are interview style, except for those companies who may have a high-profile personality at the helm. (Think Gary Vee of Vayner Media!) What informative content is endemic to your brand’s expertise? (Example: ReWork podcast on productivity, from SaaS platform Basecamp). Recording a B2B podcast for A+E and The Knot How will you grow your podcast to help you grow business? (Example: The Wealth Without Wall Street team invites high profile guests , like Pat Flynn, in their work wheelhouse, and appear as guests on other podcasts, too like this episode of Dave Jackson’s School of Podcasting!) The HOW: It starts with your microphone! There are lots of suggestions you can easily Google, but here’s a snapshot: You might have had a studio at your offices...even an editor... but as we #WFH think bedroom! Think closet! Think where can you find sound absorption...Listen to Shelly Palmer’s advice to me and the sound difference in Epi 2 of Insider Interviews. You can record on an editing platform like Squadcast or Descript... then you’ll need to UPLOAD the audio file to a hosting site. If you want to try Blubrry use MOSSAPPEAL as your promo code for a discount, or look at Libsyn, BuzzSprout, Captivate and more. ..MARKET THYSELF! More hints and suggestions are in this 15 minute dump and download, from my experience to you. And again, I’m here to help. If you’re in the media/marketing world with a senior executive who is guest-worthy please drop me a line or reach out on social media! If you want help creating your own podcast from scratch, happy to exec produce or host! LMK! E.B.
As VP of data and research for NYI - the ad sales interconnect in the country's biggest DMA, Betsy Rella likes finding the stories in the numbers – the takeaways she extrapolates from surveys and data sets that NYI can use to grow the advertising business. And, at a time when the world, literally, is home and when those numbers say that New Yorkers are consuming more video than ever, that information is key. Since everyone in media/marketing is also playing catch up on their knowledge base and business insights, I asked Rella for a download on trends in consumption and a 101 on how media buys are planned and sold differently these days. Always wanted a solid definition of "Impression-Based Buying"? You got it. How that differs from "Holistic Media Planning"? Done. We also talked about the very definition of TV today, how media companies need to assess all the ways and places people are consuming video (and whatever they call TV), the rise of CTV ("connected TV") and why Cuomo Prime Time is consistently topping the ratings along with all kinds of news programs. It's actually a little beyond a "101", so get the "201" on today's shifts in media buying and planning from a data and research exec who has worked at ABC, Lifetime, MTV, Weather Channel, Ispos and TiVo! Listen to the full podcast, and please subscribe wherever you love to listen (And speaking of RATINGS - a bunch of stars for Insider Interviews with E.B. Moss on Apple would be appreciated!) Key takeaways: On TV: "You could be watching on your TV set, you could be watching on your phone, you could be watching on your computer, you could be watching on your iPad. And Nielsen classifies different types of households: a home that is a cable home or an over the air home or a broadband only home. But people are still buying TV sets. So, in some ways it's still TV, but there’s more content is available, whether it's through ad-supported cable networks or paid channels. On Impression-based Buying: "With the dawn of new technologies, phones, tablets and so on, and the ability for consumers to engage with content on all these platforms, the game has changed as has the need for advertisers to flight campaigns across these multiple platforms. Because, of course, if you can't measure it, you can't sell it!  If you look at Nielsen data, overall time spent with video is relatively flat over the last two years. But what's changed is how people are viewing: we see a decline in live plus time shifted TV, but an increase in viewing on connected devices, smart phones and tablets. So, this begs the question, how do you measure all the viewing across these many platforms so you can report back to the client in a more unified way? Using impressions unifies linear and digital, and also eliminates any ratings discrepancies from using different universes." On TV Consumption as we #StayHome: "Usage levels have surged across multiple day parts and it's not just adults -- we're seeing growth in teens and 18 to 34s as well. Ratings are up, of course, for news networks across the board, not only in early morning, but all dayparts, even overnight. as we're seeing people staying up later than they were before. We're seeing live TV up. DVR playback up. And streaming in New York is up 44%. That's a pretty big number and was measured just a few weeks ago." On the Need for and Challenge of Holistic Media Planning: "Right now you get TV in one place, digital in another place. Ideally you would have one platform where everything's feeding into it in terms of your TV piece, your digital piece, your OTT piece, your set top box, video on demand piece. Part of it involves legacy thinking and workflows that have existed for decades, and quite honestly, the systems themselves. It all needs to feed into one platform so you're not operating on a siloed basis." On Advertising and Brand Marketing Now: "Consumers say they want brands to share information on how they're supporting their staff ...
Ironically, at a time when we cannot physically touch, adding a human touch is more essential than ever -- especially at work, even while we WFH. I turned to Erica Keswin, a “workplace strategist,” bestselling author and advisor to major companies aiming to improve performance by improving relationships. There are plenty of tech stack suggestions for working from home, but once the software or the scanners are set up, how do we tackle the human side of remote work now and pivot in how we communicate? Zooming in on Workplace Strategies with Erica Keswin and E.B. Moss As a deeper dive to her recent webinar with The Female Quotient on some of the tenets of her last book, Bring Your Human to Work, Keswin shared more suggestions that companies can bank on. While her advice spans all industries, frankly everything a brand marketer does in today's COVID-19 environment has to be run through the lens of humanity. The following time codes are points in the podcast of particular interest: (2:30) “The definition of being human means honoring relationships -- with colleagues, your boss, the people that work for you, your customers.” (4:30) The impact of technology on our relationships – good and bad: “When ‘left to our own devices’ we're not connecting”. (7:55) Why bringing your human to work helps employee attraction and customer retention (8:30) Why communicating a brand’s values has to “get off the walls and into the halls”; in other words, from a framed set of platitudes to a select set of three or four values that are reflected by all it does and guideposts for marketing decisions. (10:05) The imperative of speaking in a human voice across all mediums of communication and why defaulting to the technological end of the spectrum are not best practices during socially distanced times. (12:00) How to start: tap all employees -- and even companies -- to gauge if values are resonating (15:20) Why even with the ability to connect these days through Zooms or Teams, it’s still best practices to “mind your meetings” and not be beholden to “business as usual” for the sake of having a meeting. (16:30) A refresher on the “three Ps”: purpose, presence and protocols. (18:25) Finally, Keswin, who will detail this is a forthcoming book, explains why a company needs to have rituals – like a “corporate habit” with a higher level of meaning -- which employees can count on.
One of the smarter ideas I’ve had recently was to invite the even smarter Shelly Palmer to guest on this episode of the Insider Interviews podcast. I had an ulterior motive: I’d been challenged by my work-from-home (WFH) tech set up and he is the go-to guy for keeping us all on point.  Palmer, of CNN, CNBC, Fox 5 NY contributor fame, advises companies on their “digital transformation” and was also a LinkedIn Top Voice in Technology. And I needed help.  Our conversation went from scientific explanations to fun anecdotes about his own podcast on the Westwood One network, Think About This with Shelly Palmer and Ross Martin, to the topic of his most recent interactive online chat, hosted on his new tech-focused social network, PGX: what a post-Corona Virus society might look like. Palmer is not shy about airing strong opinions without much prompting. You'll hear thoughts, recommendations and advice on: On Choosing One Tech Tool Over Another:  (“In some cases, it’s just personal preference. In others it has to do technologically with where you are and what you're trying to do.” He uses Zoom for meet-ups with 150 or so attendees and Webinar Jam for one-to-many.) On Adapting to Technology: (“People have been accepting of technical glitches that they never  would have before... like when smartphones [drove] vertical video. It’s been fascinating to see how fast people are willing to adopt bad lighting, camera angles, and bad hair. It's fantastic because the most important thing is that we figure out how to be social animals in a time when COVID-19 is forcing us to be less social.” On Using A Personal Tech Stack More Personally: ("If you're working for a bigger corporation, they'll likely dictate the VPN and office suite you're going to use. [A good choice] for small collaborative companies is Google Suite and have Slack running to interact with clients without having to send email. But a lot of clients are using Microsoft Teams. But when you're working totally by yourself right now, the most important thing you can do, I think, is send an email or a text message to everybody you know in the world -- and find out how they're doing.”) On AI (replacing for journalists?!), and “Truthiness” in media, and if we will continue to Zoom like crazy?: That you’ll have to listen to the podcast for. Bonus: you’ll learn which recording platform I picked too. And visit shellypalmer.com for his very robust list of resources for your own WFH tech set up. Whether or not it involves a podcast.
With more media consumption projected during our current crisis -- and radio and podcast hosts perceived as companions -- I thought it was a fitting time to speak with someone who has spent an entire career in audio – from on-air in college to the C-Suite of major radio networks, to delivering multiplatform content aligned with high wattage personalities:  Gary Krantz, chief executive officer of Krantz Media Group LLC (KMG). Proof positive? One of the last times I hung out with Gary was alongside classic rock legends like Alice Cooper, Jimmy Page and Brian May, in London. But I digress.... Conal Byrne of iHeart Podcast Network with Gary Krantz Krantz has taken entertainment companies and brands from conventional broadcast to digital business models and helped fuel the radio careers of such notables as Carson Daly, Ryan Seacrest and Rachel Maddow. In a conversation for Insider Interviews podcast, he explains how he leveraged his stick-to-itiveness to go from unpaid “gopher” to ultimately help run MJI Broadcasting (later acquired by iHeartMedia, where he became executive vice president of their Premiere division), on to president of Air America to chief digital media officer at Westwood One. We learn how his gut instincts led him to syndicate some of the biggest names and events on air and ultimately adding to the utopian landscape of podcasting, with the launch of half a dozen new podcasts, some in conjunction once again with iHeart, including The Fred Minnick Show and Politicon, hosted by Clay Aikens. You'll want to listen to the whole conversation to get the inside scoop on radio from the 70s to today, and making moves in podcasting and syndication. Here are the pictures, as promised in the episode!
These days, every video provider is looking to land ad dollars with a one-two punch of broad but targeted reach for brand awareness, matched with proof of performance -- or business outcomes -- via addressability or attribution. A+E Networks calls the combo "Precision + Performance." In this bonus episode of Insider Interviews I thought it was important to get some terminology down for future episodes dealing with the business of television today. So, Ethan Heftman, senior vice president of Precision + Performance took me through the group's approach to me and also discussed A+E's first-to-market guarantees to advertisers of some select business outcomes. (The following overview of the conversation has been edited for clarity and brevity.) I asked Heftman for specifics, starting with the way A+E defines attribution. "For us, it's … tying a media exposure on A+E Networks to a specific business outcome," he explained. "It's going beyond simply the discussion of what type of media metric we delivered [like an "impression"] to what type of action or behavior that impression caused. For example, is it fueling a behavior at the top of the funnel -- the awareness area -- or the middle, the consideration area. Or, is it impacting the bottom of the funnel, a sale or specific outcome type?" A+E markets its Precision + Performance product as impacting outcomes in each of those three areas, versus just the expected top-of-funnel. Historically, "television hasn't been properly credited with outcomes in the real action area: driving a web visit, driving a store visit, driving a specific sale," Heftman said. Next, Heftman explained A+E's view of precision and performance. "Precision is our advanced audience targeting tools; that is, through the use of advanced data sets — whether it's MRI, set-top-box data from an MVPD..., Axiom or Polk data, or first-party data that an advertiser provides us," he explained. "Performance are the tools that we use to discuss, find, and prove specific outcomes within that purchase funnel. The better job you do of identifying and finding those discreet audience segments, the better job you do of picking dayparts and programs that deliver against them, the better outcomes you will have." Sort of like this: If I'm watching Married at First Sight on their Lifetime network -- and I'm not saying I do...well maybe I do -- A+E is willing to guarantee to the national retailer that advertises in that show and other Lifetime or A+E programming, that by precisely targeting people like me with some fancy data they can show that people like me went into that store or visited the retailer's site (performance). Guaranteed. You really should listen to the entire episode for Heftman's explanations and insights. He also shared the categories that perform well and which platforms A+E can precision target (hint: all) and measure performance across (ditto!): "We've always been able to talk about performance outcomes in the digital space, in the OTT space. We believe that the real game-changer is being able to have that conversation in the linear space and then marry that with the existing conversation in digital and over the top." A version of this bonus episode of Insider Interviews with E.B. Moss originally posted on MediaVillage 3/5/20.
I'm a radio brat. We hijacked the common military slang for those who moved around a lot. In our case it was my Dad getting hired and the next bigger radio market...and the next bigger radio market. So, being "raised in radio" explains a little about the origins of this podcast - interviewing those in the media, marketing, advertising and entertainment industry. Because after following in my dad's footsteps to a radio career, I also found my own footing in television, publishing...and, yup, digital audio. But just for backstory, my fledgling radio career in local New Jersey stations DID lead to a decent career in doing voiceovers in San Francisco...and even landing the same agent as Casey Kasem in Hollywood! But that's where it stopped...until I went behind the scenes, marketing radio, then television at E!, Lifetime and Food networks...and guess what? Then audio companies, too, like Westwood One and AdLarge. That led me I began writing about the media and marketing industry ...and then as Managing Editor/Head of Content Strategy for Jack Myers' MediaVillage most recently I began interviewing everyone from agency leaders like Sir Martin Sorrell and brand experts like Bozoma Saint John; from the chief marketing officers of SAP to Sam’s Club, the NFL to Hershey’s.... All of this has helped me gain a pretty good understanding of not just how to speak with executives in almost any area, but to really recognize that today, companies all have to be able to embrace audio AND television AND print AND social media to get their business message out there. So that's what I’ll doing: using audio, and some long form show notes with lots of links to help you navigate information and interesting stories from thought leaders in all areas of the industry... with a little insight on who they are personally... and hopefully a little fun along the way. And, if you ever want to talk local radio from South Jersey to Southern California, let me know! If you have a suggested executive to profile, let me know! If you read that I'll be interviewing someone (I'll post via Twitter and other platforms), let me know what questions you want me to ask! And all I ask is that I you listen to this all new Insider Interviews podcast, with me, E.B. Moss, and subscribe, share and, most of all enjoy! E.B.
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Podcast Details

Created by
E.B. Moss
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Mar 4th, 2020
Latest Episode
Oct 22nd, 2020
Release Period
2 per month
Episodes
23
Avg. Episode Length
31 minutes
Explicit
No
Order
Episodic

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