Jeffery Saddoris: Everything

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Earlier today, Bill and I recorded episode 312 of On Taking Pictures and while I wouldn’t say it was our best show—it was a good show. I think every show is a good show for one reason or another. It was one of the more significant shows because of the number—episode 312. If you do the math, 312 marks the end of six years of doing On Taking Pictures every week and while I’ve talked in the past about what doing OTP has meant to me and what I’ve learned from it, how it has changed my life and the new friends I have as a result of it, those things are really byproducts of doing the work. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   Christopher Burkett is a landscape photographer who uses a large format 8×10 film camera and discontinued Cibacrome paper to make stunning photographs of the natural world. Unfortunately, when Christopher runs out of paper, he will put away his camera and turn out the lights in his darkroom for the last time. Sanderson to Brackettville is short documentary made by filmmaker Parker Hill as she followed photographer Jason Lee on a four-day stretch in West Texas as he attempted “to document residual American landscapes across Texas in early 2017 with large format color films” for his new book A Plain View. If you are a fan of classic movies and terrific graphic design, Indiewire has you covered with this fantastic collection of every movie poster iconic graphic design Saul Bass ever created.   Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
Trying to make a living as a professional photographer is hard, really hard. You might get into it thinking that all you’re going to do is take pictures, but it doesn’t take long to realize that time with a camera in your hands is only a small part of a what’s required day to day. It’s even harder when you’re also working a full-time job. But Freddy Clark is doing the work. He’s taking his passion for photography, an encyclopedic knowledge of beer, and a background in IT and is steadily building a new career as a food and beverage photographer, and it all started at a small rock ’n’ roll radio station in the Poconos. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS CONNECT URL: http://santephoto.com Instagram: @santephoto Twitter: @santephoto Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
There are some photographs that just stick with you — images that once you see them, you simply can’t unsee. It happens across virtually all genres of photography. A single image, a particular project or an entire body of work seeps into our being and becomes a point of reference along an internal visual continuum. When I first saw the work of Nick Brandt, it was unlike anything I had ever seen. His photographs taken in East Africa transcended any wildlife photography that I had seen before. Nick is somehow able to photograph the souls of the animals, not just their image or likeness. In his newest body of work, called Inherit the Dust, Nick returns to East Africa to show how habitat loss as a result of population explosion and urbanization are dramatically changing the landscape and threatening biodiversity and the continued existence of species that roamed the plains of Africa for thousands of years prior to the proliferation of man. It’s a fascinating conversation and an incredibly powerful body of work. Subscribe: iTunes | Overcast | Pocket Casts | RSS SHOW NOTES Big Life Foundation Amboseli Park Fitzcarraldo Apocalypse Now The Godfather Godfather, Part II The Conversation The Secret Life of Walter Mitty CONNECT URL: nickbrandt.com Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
Sean Tucker is a photographer in London who I was introduced to by an On Taking Pictures listener who emailed me and told me “you have to see this guy’s work. I think it’s right up your alley.” He was right. Sean’s work is terrific, but it was his YouTube channel—how he approaches and speaks about photography and creativity—that was even more up my alley. As you’ll hear, Sean is honest, insightful, and the dedication he has to the craft of photography really shines through. We begin this episode at a point in the conversation where we were talking about some of the challenges commercial photographers face working with clients, specifically when your ability as a photographer to simply shoot the brief seems more important than having the talent and creativity to go beyond it. Subscribe: iTunes | Overcast | Pocket Casts | RSS CONNECT URL: http://seantucker.photography/ YouTube: Sean Tucker Instagram: @seantuck Twitter: @seantuck Facebook: Sean Tucker Photography Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
There’s a saying in photography that goes “pretty light plus a pretty subject equals a pretty picture.” And if you believe that, then you might be tempted to form an opinion about who Gareth Lewis is based solely on the provocative nature of his portfolio, but you’d be wrong. After booking a one-way flight from his native London to Australia, Gareth found himself a stranger in a strange land. Before settling in Melbourne, he spent the first year driving over 24,000 kilometers exploring Australia in a “Miami White” station wagon. Along the way, he picked tomatoes, clipped mandarins, and even did a brief stint as a jackaroo before eventually finding his way to a camera. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS CONNECT URL: http://www.garethlewisphotography.com Instagram: @garethlewis   Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
A week or so ago, I was talking to my friend Gareth about how frustrated I was in not feeling like I had a clear and consistent creative voice. It’s not uncommon for me to feel overwhelmed and frankly paralyzed by the number of options I have and unable to get out of my own way to take action on any of them. “You need to talk to Vari,” he said. “Like today. Don’t put it off. I’m going to tell her you’ll be calling.” Gareth’s partner Vari wears quite a few hats – one of them being that of creative coach, helping people just like me — and maybe you — to fail forward and to overcome the obstacles we create and get back into that flow state of making. I reached out to her and asked her if she’d be willing to talk about some of this with me and I’m so glad she said yes. It’s a terrific conversation about figuring out what living a creative life looks like to you and unapologetically striving for balance, happiness and success doing what you love. Subscribe: iTunes | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   I’d love to hear from you. Email me at talkback@jefferysaddoris.com or connect with me on Instagram @jefferysaddoris. You can catch up with Vari on Instagram @varilongmuir or on her website at varilongmuir.com   Music in this episode: Take Me Higher (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
The other day, a friend of mine sent me a text message asking why I haven’t set up a Patreon for my podcasts. “Why would I do that?” I asked. “Asks the person who has wondered how he can get paid for the podcast he puts out,” he replied. There were a few more exchanges after this, but you get the idea. This was being asked by one of my closest friends and I know that it was absolutely from a space of love and out of the belief that what I do has value – monetary value – and he wants to see that value acknowledged in dollars. And to be fair, he has a valid point. I do too. But it’s not a simple as if/then – as in if you produce a podcast — or any creative work for that matter — then you’ll get paid for it. There are a lot of moving parts, so to really unpack it, we have to have an honest conversation about podcasting and money. Subscribe: iTunes | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   LINKS Arnaud Sagnier is a terrific collage artist who publishes under the name @Grafikstreet. His work is a mashup of vintage and modern aesthetics and the way he combines source material is just fantastic. Tom Crouch is a British singer songwriter who I found through a collaboration he did with the band Joseph, who Adrianne and I saw with Dawes and Shovels and Rope a couple months ago. You can find Tom @liminalofficial Tim Okamura is an incredible painter who blows me away with every new piece. His technique is tight but loose. His subject matter is powerful and he just seems like a super cool guy.   Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
One of the struggles in making, regardless of what it is that you make is the tendency to compare ourselves to the artists who inspire us. But what do you do when the work you produce isn’t even close to the work of your creative heroes? Some give up, while others see slight missteps and outright failures as necessary components in the creative process. Disappointment with what we make can be creative fuel. Being creatively off balance can lead us to new ideas and directions that we never could have planned. Our appreciation of the work we do in the wake is often directly proportional to effort we put into it. Subscribe: iTunes | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   I’d love to hear from you. Email me at talkback@jefferysaddoris.com or connect with me on Instagram @jefferysaddoris. You can catch up with Jon on Instagram @jonwilkening or on his website at jonwilkening.com.   Music in this episode: Take Me Higher (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
Next month, we will have been in this house for two years and it’s taken me all of that time to finally get around to beginning the build out  of the two basement spaces that will ultimately become my studios — one for podcasting and digital media and the other for painting and printing. The previous owners of the house were both makers—he was a woodworker and an engineer and she was a painter. Together, they literally built the house in 1956 and in fact one of the downstairs spaces served as a wood shop where the living room built-ins and the kitchen cabinets were made. So there’s a history of making here and I knew before we even bought the house and moved in that I wanted at least one of the spaces downstairs as a studio, and I think I even told Adrianne that I would start building it out on day one. But here we are two years later and still no studio. What happened? I think like so many creative endeavors, it has something to do with fear, or what Steven Pressfield calls “Resistance.” And before I go much further, if you are a maker or a creator and have not read The War of Art, either pause this episode and go order yourself a copy or write yourself a note to pick one up after. It may take a couple readings to really get it, but once it sinks in, it will offer a ton of insight into the creative process and how self-doubt and fear can be debilitating until you get a handle on them. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   Filmmaker Brian Carlson made a terrific short film about lawnmower racing called 41x. Lens Culture recently shared a brilliant photo essay by photographer Michael Christopher Brown called Yo Soy Fidel. In the essay, Brown follows the “Freedom Caravan” that carried Fidel Castro’s remains across Cuba after his death. It’s a gorgeous set of photographs. One of my favorite artists, Shepard Fairey, just completed the largest piece of his career. It’s a 15 story mural of Johnny Cash that takes up the entire side of the Residence Inn hotel in Sacramento. The mural was inspired by a photograph by Jim Marshall of Cash at Folsom Prison and in this interview with Capital Public Radio, Fairey talks about how the piece came together.   Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
Lately I’ve been seeing, or maybe just noticing, the word “iconic” as a means for makers to describe their own work—“my name is so and so and I make iconic portraits of whatever…,” and I’ve got to tell you, I’m having a hard time with how it’s being used. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   The Atlantic posted a terrific article on how the “Nifty 50” became the goto lens for many photographers. If you’ve ever thought about making your own photo book, you’ll want to check out this PDN article on the art and process of sequencing your images for photobooks. If you love model trains and miniatures, here’s a fascinating documentary about two brothers who quit their jobs to create Miniatur Wunderland a massive miniature city that has become the most popular tourist attraction in Germany.   Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
One of the biggest struggles as a maker, regardless of what it is that you’re making, can be finding meaning in what you make. Whether you’re a painter, or a sculptor, or a writer, or a photographer, finding meaning in a particular project is often one of the obstacles that prevents us from starting, or can be one of the challenges to overcome in order to finish. As someone who spends a great deal of time talking to creative people, I often hear about projects at the poles, either early in the planning stages, or after the work has been completed, but rarely in the middle — which can be a challenge to talk about because there are often themes and ideas that haven’t quite come together yet. Oli Kellett is a street photographer from the UK who’s 18 months into a multi year project that brings him to America several times a year to photograph cities and the people who inhabit them. At its core, the project is about crossroads, but as you’ll hear in this conversation, Oli is still wrestling with the literal representation — those few moments before the light has changed that leave us alone with our thoughts — to the symbolism and myth of the crossroads that draws a line from the ancient Greeks to a young guitar player from Mississippi who made a deal with the devil just outside Memphis. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS CONNECT URL: https://www.olikellett.com Instagram: @Oli_Kellett PDN Photo Annual Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
A couple weeks ago, I had a terrific conversation with an artist whose work I’ve admired for years. And while it was a treat to get to talk to someone who has inspired me for decades, the work was only a small part of the conversation. Instead, we just talked. We connected straight away and what was meant to be a quick phone call just to say hello ahead of a potential episode of Process Driven ended up being a two hour conversation about everything from family and our respective childhoods to love, loss, Studio 54, JK Rowling, and even musings on the nature of art. On more than one occasion and typically after a particularly interesting exchange, one of us would comment, “man, we should be recording this.” But instead we chose to just keep enjoying the experience — a one-off conversation between nascent friends. Subscribe: iTunes | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   LINKS This month, a brand new record from John Coltrane comes out. Blue World was recorded with Coltrane’s Classic Quartet in 1964 between Crescent and A Love Supreme. Ahead of the September 27th launch, Universal has released a gorgeous video that really captures the look and feel of some of the iconic Reid Miles covers. One of my favorite recent television shows is called The Boys, which is adapted from the comic by Garth Ennis, a monster in comics who also created Preacher and wrote The Punisher, Hellblazer and a bunch of other books. His latest project is a six-issue series called SARA, which tells the story of seven female snipers who find themselves caught up in a deadly struggle against an evil German invader. The series has been called a masterclass in comics storytelling and one of the finest works of his career. Robert Frank died Monday at the age of 94. He was one of the most influential photographers in the game and his book The Americans inspired almost every other famous photographer you could think of. If you’ve ever considered pursuing photography he’s a photographer whose work you’ll definitely want to know.   Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
We’re getting close to the end of the year and if you’re like me, you’re already looking ahead to 2020 – maybe you have been for a while – trying to come up with some great new project or maybe multiple projects that will make the next year better than this one. I love the idea of big projects and in fact I’ve already started laying the groundwork for what’s looking more and more like the biggest solo project of my career – but while I’m more excited about it than I’ve been about anything in a while, I’m also terrified that I won’t be able to pull it off or that it will end up being less than what I think it could or should be. Big projects are great when you finish them but, man, they can be a slog. And typically the bigger the project, the more we hope or expect from it in terms of response once we actually do finish it. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS If you enjoy listening to Iterations, please consider leaving a review or a rating where you listen to podcasts to help others discover the show. LINKS https://www.charliecliftphotography.com The Beastie Boys book David Hurn Documentary on BBC Two    Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
Tomorrow would have been my mom’s 74th birthday and while not a day goes by that I don’t miss her, I am grateful for the life I was allowed to share with her. She was generous, compassionate, and the most unconditionally loving person I have ever met. She always encouraged me to embrace the quirky, creative side of myself and insisted that following my passion meant not holding back and always giving 100%. As a child, my mom was a dancer—she and her brother Jerry even appeared on The Jack Parr Show together. A few years later, Jerry decided that “dancing was for sissies,” then life ultimately got in the way and my mom eventually gave it up too. While a life as a professional dancer was not to be, music was still an important part of her life. Even after I came along, our house was always filled with music—mostly Motown. I grew up on a steady musical diet of artists like Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight, Marvin Gaye, and the Jackson 5. But when she wasn’t grooving to the sounds coming out of Hitsville USA, she was listening to Elvis. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   Here’s a link to the 1999 Charlie Rose Interview with Richard Avedon that I referenced in this episode.If you enjoy that, you may also like this terrific documentary about Avedon called Darkness and Light. The artist Christo has just unveiled his latest installation, called The London Mastaba—a 600 ton pyramid made of brightly painted 55-gallon drums. The whole gigantic thing is floating in Serpentine Lake in London. I know I’m a little late to the game on this, but if you want to either deepen or broaden your musical knowledge, check out allmusic.com. It’s an incredible resource that has not only album reviews, but also shows connections to similar artists and recommendations for the best albums within a given artist’s discography . The site even offers suggestions for albums based on your current mood. For example, feeling ironic? Check out Elvis Costello’s Trust, Blur’s Modern Life is Rubbish, or David Bowie’s Aladdin Sane – terrific record by the way.   Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
 As much as I love working with acrylics in my paintings, because many of them are literally dozens of layers of pigment, collage, found objects, and thick layers of acrylic medium, it can take weeks to finish a single piece just waiting for layers to dry. A few years ago, I began looking into using encaustic, which offers the ability to create work with a similar aesthetic to my acrylic work in a fraction of the time. In doing the research, I came across the work of Lisa Pressman. Lisa is a fabulous artist from New Jersey who works in both encaustic and oils and has been exhibiting her work for nearly four decades. In addition to making her own work, she inspires others to start their own artistic journey through her workshops and one on one mentoring. Lisa and I have spoken a few times and I’m so grateful that we were finally able to hit the record button. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast | Google Podcasts | RSS If you enjoy listening to Process Driven, please consider leaving a review or a rating wherever you listen to help others discover the show. SHOW NOTES Connect with Lisa: Website | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook Elizabeth Murray: https://elizabethmurrayart.org Ross Bleckner: https://rbleckner.com/ Susan Rothberg: https://www.artsy.net/artist/susan-rothenberg Gregory Amenoff: http://www.gregoryamenoff.com Terry Winters: https://www.terrywinters.org Philip Guston: https://www.wikiart.org/en/philip-guston Joan Mitchell: https://www.wikiart.org/en/joan-mitchell Jake Berthot: http://www.bettycuninghamgallery.com/artists/estate-of-jake-berthot-1939-2014 James Marshall: https://www.moca.org/exhibition/kerry-james-marshall-mastry Hans Hofmann: https://www.hanshofmann.org Alice Neel: http://www.aliceneel.com/ Pretty much the best book out there for working with oils and cold wax: Cold Wax Medium: Techniques, Concepts & Conversations* Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0   WANT TO SUPPORT THE WORK I’M DOING? Subscribe & Review: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast | Google Podcasts Tell Your Friends & Share Episodes Online: You can even share a favorite show clip using the terrific Recast feature. I’ve made a video showing you how: Create Custom Audiograms with Recast by Simplecast – YouTube Donate: Check out my Patreon account Use my Amazon Affiliate Links: Occasionally, I’ll include links to things that I either own and use myself (mostly books) or think might be helpful/useful/inspiring to you. I will never simply spam product lists (such as “what’s in my bag?”). If I’m including an affiliate link, it’s for something I actually believe in. *Disclosure: Books and products marked with an asterisk are linked to an affiliate program. I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for me to earn advertising fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
At the end of May, I decided to take a break from social media so I could focus on making without the constant background noise that seemed to be sucking the life out the urge to create anything. It was a self-imposed blackout that I hoped would allow at least some of the creative light back in. Inspired by a recent documentary, I decided to work on a series of 12 paintings simultaneously rather than a single piece, and within a couple weeks I had completed twelve new pieces of work. Seeing them spread out on the bench was like fuel to keep going, so I set a fairly ambitious goal: to create 53 new paintings — including the first twelve — by my 53rd birthday on July 21st. Well, my birthday was yesterday and at about 4 o’clock, I put the final brushstrokes of black edging on the last piece, which was actually piece number 54. A week or so ago, when I still wasn’t quite sure I’d make the goal, I sat down with Jon to talk about the project. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast | Google Podcasts | RSS CONNECT You can find Jon on Instagram @jonwilkening or on his website at jonwilkening.com If you have an interesting story to share, I’d love to hear from you. Email me at talkback@jefferysaddoris.com or connect with me on Instagram @jefferysaddoris. Music in this episode: Take Me Higher (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0 WANT TO SUPPORT THE WORK I’M DOING? Subscribe & Review: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast | Google Podcasts Tell Your Friends & Share Episodes Online: You can even share a favorite show clip using the terrific Recast feature. I’ve made a video showing you how: Create Custom Audiograms with Recast by Simplecast – YouTube Donate: Check out my Patreon account Use my Amazon Affiliate Links: Occasionally, I’ll include links to things that I either own and use myself (mostly books) or think might be helpful/useful/inspiring to you. I will never simply spam product lists (such as “what’s in my bag?”). If I’m including an affiliate link, it’s for something I actually believe in. *Disclosure: Books and products marked with an asterisk are linked to an affiliate program. I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for me to earn advertising fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
One of my favorite photo documentaries is Darkness & Light, which is a fantastic look into the mind and work of Richard Avedon. A lot of people know Avedon from his photographs in the American West – bold monochrome portraits set against stark white backgrounds or “that poster.” You know the one – it features a nude Nastassja Kinski lying on a concrete floor entangled with a massive Burmese python. Originally shot for Vogue, the poster went on to sell millions of copies. Avedon’s career spanned six decades and his work bridged the gap between art and commerce in a way that few others managed to do – either before or since – and yet still he felt dissatisfied with all that he had accomplished as a photographer. “I’ve never been able to put all I know into a photograph,” he said. “A photograph can be an adjective, a phrase. It can even be a sentence or a paragraph, but it can never be a chapter. So it’s been a lifetime of frustration in terms of expressing myself because of the limitations of the visual image. I believe in it-but it’s limited.” Avedon has been at or near the the top of my list of favorite photographers for the better part of three decades but honestly it’s still hard for me to articulate why I feel such a connection to his work. There’s an obvious technical mastery of the medium, but I could say the same for dozens of photographers whose work doesn’t hold my interest in the same way or resonate as deeply as that of Avedon. So what is it that makes his work so compelling to me? Does he deserve the accolades and if so, why? I was talking to my friend Hugh Talman and happened to have my little Zoom H2 with me and asked if we could hit the record button since the odds are pretty good that at least one amazing story will emerge. Hugh recently retired from a 33-year tenure at the Smithsonian Museum of American History, first as a darkroom tech and then as a photographer. Before that, he spent 12 years at the National Archives where he printed many of Matthew Brady’s glass plates from the Civil War as well as the work Timothy O’Sullivan did as part of the Western Survey. His knowledge and experience in all things photographic is staggering and if anyone could answer the question, it would be him. Subscribe: iTunes | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   I’d love to hear from you. Email me at talkback@jefferysaddoris.com or connect with me on Instagram @jefferysaddoris. You can catch up with Hugh on Instagram @hughtalman. Music in this episode: Gloom (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
I had something else planned for this episode, but I got a little surprise in the mail and decided to go in a different direction. On Wednesday of last week, as I went to take Cooper on his ten o’ clock walk, I noticed a big padded envelope on the front porch with the words “UNSOLICITED GIFT” written on the outside. Now, I can be a little strange about gifts, even the ones I know are coming, so when one just shows up anonymously I sometimes don’t know how to react. Fortunately, Adrianne was working from home that day and was able to offer some sage advice that wasn’t as obvious as it probably should have been as I stood there staring at the package. “Well,” she said, “the only way you’re gonna know what it is is to open it.” Right. Inside, wrapped in newspaper, was the gift itself and an envelope that contained a card. I’ll get to the what in a moment, but first I want to address the why, because without the why, the what isn’t nearly as meaningful. Subscribe: iTunes | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   LINKS Here’s a terrific article from The New York Times Magazine called The Day the Music Burned, which tells the story of the 2008 Universal fire that destroyed the original analog and multitrack recordings of nearly a half million songs, some dating back to the 1940s. I’ve just picked up Adam Savage’s new book, Every Tool’s a Hammer and one of the reasons I did is because I read an article on Wired that featured an excerpt from the book all about the power of making lists and how Adam’s list making life changed when he started working at Industrial Light & Magic. In an article on Witness, Lewis Bush addresses “why there is such a poverty of theory about storytelling in photography compared to other fields, and why there is so little precision about the terms and techniques we use. Why, for example, are so few photographers able to differentiate between such fundamentally different things as story and narrative.” It’s a fascinating read that definitely has me thinking about the type of work I’d like to produce moving forward.   Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
Lately, I’ve been thinking about our connection to objects and how, at least for some of us, certain objects can represent a specific time in our lives or evoke a particular state of mind or, in the case of artists, inform the type of work we are able to produce. Painters often have a favorite brush or two — I still use a couple that I’ve had since 1988. Magnum photographer Elliott Erwitt used the same Leica M3 for decades and in 1963 Cormac McCarthy spent $50 on a Lettera 32 Olivetti manual typewriter that he used to write The Road, No Country for Old Men, All the Pretty Horses, and seven other novels. Objects can become more than the raw materials used to create them. They are somehow imbued with hope, with possibility, and something greater than ourselves. On Monday, we were reminded just how much one object can mean to so many. Subscribe: iTunes | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   LINKS Kenneth Clark’s landmark documentary Civilisation is a thirteen part series produced in 1969 for the BBC that looks at the history of Western art, architecture and philosophy since the Dark Ages. Here’s a fascinating interview with Martin Gran about what it means to be a holistic designer and the idea of looking beyond aesthetics into the deeper meaning of design and how collaboration often results in stronger work. Vice takes a look at seven photographers who are rewriting street photography’s rigid rules through clever shooting techniques, staged scenes, and a variety of digital manipulation.   Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
Joshua K Jackson is a terrific street photographer from London. On paper he’s relatively new to the genre, but his already stunning body of work is every bit as compelling as those by some of his photographic heroes. Though Josh is quick to point out that he still has a lot to learn, his dedication to photography as both an art and a craft is immediately evident in his use of bold color and superb composition to communicate mood and narrative. While he often leaves the house with any sort of expectation or agenda, he says that the energy and buzz of the city is like fuel to keep shooting, especially since you never know what the scene could be just around the next corner. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS CONNECT URL: https://www.joshkjack.com/ Instagram: @joshkjack Twitter: @joshkjack   Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
The tormented artist. You’ve heard the term — hell you may even be one yourself. I know I was. For years, I was absolutely convinced that if my art wasn’t the albatross around my neck, that I was somehow unworthy of the title. Why is that? Why do so many of us feel at one point or another that the suffering is necessary — that it’s somehow inexorably linked to the intrinsic value of what we make? That’s exactly what we’re talking about in this episode and it all begins with a Nine Inch Nails concert in 1990. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS If you enjoy listening to In Between, please consider leaving a review or a rating on iTunes to help others discover the show.   CONNECT I’d love to hear from you. Email me at talkback@jefferysaddoris.com or connect with me on Instagram or Twitter @jefferysaddoris. You can find Jon on Instagram @jonwilkening or on his website at jonwilkening.com.   Music in this episode: Take Me Higher (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
“We are all unique in the way we see things — the worst thing is to copy. The best thing is to be who you are.” As I sat down to write the intro to this episode of Process Driven, I struggled a little trying to come up with words that would convey some of my thoughts and feelings about the work of photographer Olga Karlovac. I then realized that the words had already been written by Koci Hernandez in his beautiful foreword for Olga’s latest book, the disarray. “You’re about to embark on upon a fantastic journey. It’s one of boundless time and space and it’s compressed with the pages of the book you now hold. I only wish I could experience again, for the first time, the disarray — visual poetry as a master work. Let me assure you, the sign posts on your journey will be stunningly clear and mysteriously opaque, filled with blurry lines, half made worlds and the formless. Olga wouldn’t have it any other way. Don’t be fooled by what you think you see, because dancing within these pages is an unbound energy — an energy that at once can overwhelm the spirit and set eyes ablaze in wonder. You have been warned.” That’s an excerpt of the foreword from the disarray. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS If you enjoy listening to Process Driven, please consider leaving a review or a rating on iTunes to help others discover the show.   CONNECT URL: https://www.olga-karlovac-photography.com/ Instagram: @olga.karlovac Facebook: @olga.karlovac   Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
I had a friend in college—let’s call him Michael—who was one of the most interesting people I had ever met up to that point in my life. He was the first person I’d met who had…almost an “aura” about him, for lack of a better word, along with several unique qualities that just made him fascinating to be around. He wasn’t what you would call a “goth” per se, but his appearance was striking. His hair would change often, both in color and style, he was typically clad in black, wore eyeliner, a variety of rings and bracelets, and even had black painted fingernails. I met Michael through a mutual friend in the theater department and what I found most interesting was that he didn’t seem to be playing a part or persona, this was just who he was at the time. One of the biggest influences Michael had on me was his taste in music. Michael played guitar in a band and introduced me to entire genres of music that I had never heard of before from bands like Dead Can Dance, This Mortal Coil, Cocteau Twins, and Peter Murphy. Another friend at the time—a modern dancer named “Memo”—was actually friends with Peter and years later invited me to see him, along with Nine Inch Nails at a little club in Atlanta—but I’ll save that story for another time. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Pocket Casts | Overcast | RSS   One thing my dad and I had in common was our love of westerns. When I was little, many weekend afternoons were spent on the sofa watching the likes of John Wayne, Gary Cooper, and Clint Eastwood. Photographer Mark Parascandola visits some of the ghost towns that Hollywood built, and then abandoned, that dot the landscape of southwestern Spain. Here’s an archive of just a small portion of the incredible design and layout work that Chris Ashworth has created for RayGun magazine. GQ magazine recently sat down with Paul McCartney and asked him to break down some of some of his most iconic songs, both from The Beatles and from Wings. It’s interesting to hear how the songs came about and which ones still carry weight.   Music in this episode: The Wrong Way (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
I can’t tell you what the first photograph that I ever saw by Gregory Crewdson was, but I do remember very clearly how it made me feel — how I connected to this world. Unlike any other photographer I can think of off the top of my head, this was instantly familiar to me. This world was familiar; the plights and the struggles that these characters seemed to be going through were very much my own. Feelings of disconnect, feelings of isolation — and feelings of hope and possibility that those feelings would pass — that they were stepping stones or bridges to something better. This work resonated with me, and still does, on a very deep level. In this conversation, Gregory and I discuss his brilliant new body of work, Cathedral of the Pines, as well as the very personal journey he had to undertake to bring it to life. Subscribe: iTunes | Overcast | Pocket Casts | RSS SHOW NOTES Cathedral of the Pines Sanctuary Beneath the Roses CONNECT Visit his website: http://www.gagosian.com Follow him on Twitter: @CrewdsonStudio Follow him on Instagram: @CrewdsonStudio Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
A few months ago, I attended a talk that Dan Winters gave at the Smithsonian and one of the things that struck me straight away was the language he used to describe his relationship to his work. I’ve been a fan for years and own a few of his books, but I never had the opportunity to hear him speak before. There’s such emotion and romance in how he relates to his work, especially in the making or the doing as he calls it. Words like “reverence” and “gratitude” are used often and as you’ll hear in this conversation, these aren’t simply buzzwords. They apply equally whether he’s shooting a campaign for a client or walking by himself through the streets of New York with a 50mm lens and a few rolls of Tri-X. There’s an incredible authenticity to Dan that seems to pervade his entire life, from the work that he does to the people and things he surrounds himself with. I began by asking Dan where his love of making began and how he stays connected to it 30 years in. Subscribe: iTunes | Overcast | Pocket Casts | RSS SHOW NOTES Kazimer Malevich Chris Callis Harry Callahan W. Eugene Smith Alfred Steiglitz Paul Strand Robert Frank Mark Kelley Al Reinert The Grey Ghost (Pre-order) Portrait of an American Hero… (Smithsonian) CONNECT Visit his website: http://danwintersphoto.com Follow him on Instagram: @danwintersphoto Music in this episode: Please Listen Carefully (Jahzzar) / CC BY-SA 4.0
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Podcast Details

Started
Aug 22nd, 2013
Latest Episode
Mar 13th, 2020
Release Period
Daily
No. of Episodes
96
Avg. Episode Length
36 minutes
Explicit
No

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