Keep the Channel Open

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Farrah Karapetian is an artist based in California. Known for her large-scale photograms, Farrah’s wide-ranging practice incorporates sculpture, performance, and different forms of mark-making to stretch the photographic medium as she is driven by her intense and rigorous curiosity. In our conversation, Farrah and I talked about the appeal of the photographic medium, the tension between constructing an image and the happy accident, and the ethics of artistic beauty. Then in the second segment, we discussed the Nardal sisters and how we develop a language around issues like exoticization. (Conversation recorded March 24, 2021.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Farrah Karapetian Farrah Karapetian - Muscle Memory Farrah Karapetian - Stagecraft Farrah Karapetian - Slips & Pushes HereIn Journal - “Chantel Paul on Farrah Karapetian” AnomolousCo - Beckett & The Virtual tickets Diane Rosenstein Gallery - Expo Chicago Online 2021 Farrah Karapetian in Conversation with Tracy Sharpley-Whiting Venice Family Clinic Art Walk + Auction 2021 Orange County Museum of Art - 2013 California-Pacific Triennial Erving Goffman - The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life Claire A. Warden Paula Riff Thomas Demand Vik Muniz Farrah Karapetian - “The Kitchen” Farrah Karapetian - “Its Negative” Vanessa Beecroft Tino Sehgal James Van Der Zee Rineke Dijkstra Bertholt Brecht Augusto Boal Farrah Karapetian - Relief Farrah Karapetian - Flags & Teleprompters Ingrid Sischy - “Good Intentions” David Levi Strauss - Between the Eyes: Essays on Photography and Politics André Breton - Nadja Anahid Nersessian - Keats’s Odes: A Lover’s Discourse Jeanne Nardal Paulette Nardal Alain Locke W. E. B. Du Bois Steven Y. Wong - Circles and Circuits: Chinese Caribbean Art Mark Sealy - Decolonising the Camera: Photography in Racial Time Robert Rauschenberg - Borealis 1988-92 Marie-Magdaleine Carbet - “Obeah” and Other Martinican Stories Langston Hughes - I Wonder as I Wander: An Autobiographical Journey Lola Álvarez Bravo Setting Sun: Writings by Japanese Photographers Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Tucson-based photographer Ken Rosenthal's work has always stuck in my mind for both its striking visual style and the way that he uses images to represent and explore his internal emotional and psychological state. Whether he's looking at landscapes or family members or familiar objects, his photographs resonate because they represent the personal. We talked about several bodies of work, including his recent series The Forest and a work in progress called Days On the Mountain. For the second segment, Ken and I talked about change, and how when it comes in our personal lives it can spur us to new heights in our work. (Recorded June 22, 2016. Originally released August 3, 2016.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Ken Rosenthal Purchase Days on the Mountain: Book Only | Limited Ed. with Print Ken’s online store Center for Creative Photography - “Why Photography?” event Ken Rosenthal - Photographs 2001-2009 Ken Rosenthal - The Forest Medium Festival of Photography Mary Virginia Swanson Diane Arbus Sally Mann - Hold Still Ken's Instagram Ken's Twitter Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
For this installment of the KTCO Book Club, poet and podcaster Gabrielle Bates joins me for a conversation about Brigit Pegeen Kelly’s 1994 poetry collection Song. In our conversation, Gabrielle and I talked about how Kelly builds the worlds of her poems, how the poems layer metaphor, and how the poems manage to be simultaneously (and paradoxically) both surreal and grounded. (Conversation recorded February 4, 2021.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Gabrielle Bates The Poet Salon Purchase Song: Open Books (Seattle, WA) | The Book Catapult (San Diego, CA) | Bookshop.org Brigit Pegeen Kelly - “Song” (title poem) Keep the Channel Open - Episode 49: Maggie Smith Maggie Smith - Good Bones Sally Mann - Hold Still: A Memoir with Photographs Muzzle - Jeanann Verlee on “Song” by Brigit Pegeen Kelly The Poet Salon - Ada Limón + January Gimlet Keep the Channel Open - Episode 122: Kary Wayson Kenyon Review - “The Slip interview with Kary Wayson” Brigit Pegeen Kelly - “Dead Doe” The Sundress Blog - “Lyric Essentials: Emilia Phillips reads ‘Song’ by Brigit Pegeen Kelly” Keep the Channel Open - Episode 120: Kazim Ali Keep the Channel Open - Episode 121: KTCO Book Club - Tender (with Wm Henry Morris) Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Kary Wayson is a poet based in Seattle, WA. The poems Kary’s latest collection, The Slip, are wonderfully slippery in both form and feeling, in a way that demands attention and rewards deep engagement. In our conversation we discussed what a poem can do, how we approach “meaning” in poetry, and how life changes affect our art. Then in the second segment, we talked about time and our human perception of duration. (Conversation recorded January 5, 2021.) Bonus Reading: Subscribers to the Likewise Media Patreon campaign can hear Kary read her poem “Untitled Poem (for a Feeling).” Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Kary Wayson Purchase The Slip: Burnside Review (Publisher) | Bookshop.org | Open Books (Seattle, WA) | The Book Catapult (San Diego, CA) The Stranger - “Falling for The Slip” The Seattle Review of Books - “After years of drought, Kary Wayson is writing poetry again” Keep the Channel Open - Episode 33: José Olivarez Kenyon Review - “The Slip interview with Kary Wayson” Sarah Manguso - “A Glittering” Neutral Milk Hotel - “In the Aeroplane Over the Sea” Robert Capa - “Watching the Tour de France in front of the bicycle shop owned by Pierre Cloarec, one of the cyclists in the race, Pleyben, France” - First Image - Second Image Next KTCO Book Club pick: Song, by Brigit Pegeen Kelly Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
My friend Paula Riff passed away recently, after having been ill with cancer for two years. Paula was a wonderful, kind, generous, and enthusiastic person, and a brilliant artist whose work pushed the boundaries of the photographic medium. I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to talk with her about that work for the show. In our conversation, Paula and I talked about what photography is to her, why she’s attracted to alternative processes, and how her work is ultimately autobiographical. Then for the second segment, we talked about the value of physical art spaces. In honor of her memory, I’m re-sharing our conversation today. Rest in peace, Paula. (This episode was originally released on January 15, 2020. Conversation recorded December 3, 2019.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Donate via PayPal Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Paula Riff Paula Riff - Blue Is Not the Sky Building Bridges Art Exchange - “All Women Are Dangerous II” Center for Photographic Art - “Winter Blues, Contemporary Cyanotypes” Mark Rothko László Moholy-Nagy Alfred Stieglitz Catalyst: Interviews - Paula Riff Keep the Channel Open - Episode 8: Bryan Ida The Diffusion Tapes - Tape no. 7: Mike Sakasegawa The lemon video Paula Riff - Postcards from Russia Harvey Quaytman at Blum & Poe Gallery Constructed Mythologies: Luis González Palma Mike Sakasegawa - Sheets: A Love Letter Transcript
For this installment of the KTCO Book Club, writer Wm Henry Morris joins me for a conversation about Sofia Samatar’s 2017 story collection Tender. The stories in this collection range from fairy tale and folklore to dystopian sci-fi to (almost) contemporary realism, but all have in common Samatar’s impeccable prose, attention to detail, and exceptional readership. (Conversation recorded December 19, 2020) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Sofia Samatar - Tender Wm Henry Morris Sofia Samatar - A Stranger in Olondria Sofia Samatar - The Winged Histories Sofia Samatar - “The Red Thread” Jorge Luis Borges Franz Kafka Karl Ove Knausgård Sofia Samatar - “Selkie Stories Are For Losers” Selkie Kat Howard Amal El-Mohtar Theodora Goss Sofia Samatar - “Honey Bear” Pat Frank - Alas, Babylon Nevil Shute - On the Beach Sofia Samatar - “A Girl Who Comes Out of a Chamber at Regular Intervals” E. T. A. Hoffmann Sofia Samatar - “Meet Me in Iram” Iram of the Pillars Emily St. John Mandel - Station Eleven Sofia Samatar - “Tender” Radium Girls Wm Henry Morris - “Ghosts of Salt and Spirit” Sofia Samatar - “How to Get Back to the Forest” Sofia Samatar - “An Account of the Land of Witches” Sofia Samatar - “The Closest Thing to Animals” Keep the Channel Open - Episode 113: Matthew Salesses Christian Petzhold Barbara (2012 film) Phoenix (2014 film) Transit (2018 film) Anna Seghers - Transit Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Kazim Ali is a writer based in San Diego, CA. Kazim’s latest poetry collection, The Voice of Sheila Chandra, uses sound to explode meaning and explore silence and voicelessness, bringing together history, philosophy, spirituality, and personal experience to create something truly profound. In our conversation, Kazim and I discussed the divine in art, what the sound of poetry can embody and enact, and the fundamental oneness of human life. Then for the second segment, we talked about music. (Conversation recorded December 17, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Kazim Ali Purchase The Voice of Sheila Chandra Pre-order Northern Light: Power, Land, and the Memory of Water Upcoming virtual events with Kazim Ali PoetryNow - “Know No Name” What’s Love Got to Do With It Sheila Chandra Orpheus and Eurydice Alcestis Asian American Writers’ Workshop - The Voice of Sheila Chandra with Kazim Ali, Sheila Chandra, and Rajiv Mohabir The Frost Place Ellen Bryant Voigt Prakriti Festival Kazim Ali - The Far Mosque Cyndi Lauper - At Last Alice Coltrane Qawwali Amjad Sabri Abida Parveen Kirtan Krishna Das Kazim Ali - Bright Felon Keep the Channel Open - Julia Dixon Evans Honorée Fanonne Jeffers Honorée Fanonne Jeffers - The Age of Phillis Phillis Wheatley Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Rizzhel Mae Javier is a photographer and installation artist based in San Diego, CA. I first met Rizzhel when we were both participating in the portfolio reviews at the Medium Festival a few years ago, and her stop-motion, flipbook-style pieces immediately caught my attention. More recently, Rizzhel was named one of the 2017 emerging artists by the SD Art Prize for her "Unmentionables" project, creating new art out of old mementos. We had a great conversation for the show about her artistic process, what she loves about making mistakes, and her experience as a teacher. For the second segment, Rizzhel chose the Philippines as her topic. (This episode was originally released on August 16, 2017. Conversation recorded July 26, 2017.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Rizzhel Mae Javier The AjA Project - Buy STEAM OnDemand Workshop Box The AjA Project - Apply to Speak City Heights project Rizzhel Mae Javier - Move(meant) Rizzhel Mae Javier - Unmentionables San Diego Art Institute - Millennial Pink SD Art Prize - 2017 New Contemporaries CM Curatorial Keep the Channel Open - Episode 33: José Olivarez ARID Journal - Strange Vistas: The Work of Walter Cotten Richard Keely Duane Michals Eikoh Hosoe Richard Prince Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
José Olivarez is a poet living and working in Chicago, Illinois, and is also co-host of one of my all-time favorite podcasts, The Poetry Gods. In our wide-ranging conversation we talked about how The Poetry Gods came to be, toxic masculinity in the poetry world, and how discovering poetry allowed José to find his artistic voice. In the second segment, we talked about beginnings and endings. (This episode was originally released on February 15, 2017. Conversation recorded January 1, 2017.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: José Olivarez José Olivarez - Citizen Illegal José Olivarez - The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 4: LatiNEXT “In Search of the Ecstatic” Workshop “Revision Is Writing” Workshop The Poetry Gods Jon Sands Aziza Barnes T-Pain: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert Louder Than a Bomb Celeste Ng - Everything I Never Told You José Olivarez - “I Walk Into the Ocean” Young Chicago Authors Urban Word NYC Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib - “Searching for a New Kind of Optimism” Maria Popova - “Hope, Cynicism, and the Stories We Tell Ourselves” Patricia Smith Gloria Anzaldúa - Borderlands Eduardo Galeano - Open Veins of Latin America Keah Brown @_joseolivarez Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Esmé Weijun Wang's debut novel The Border of Paradise was one of my favorite books of 2016. A multigenerational epic centered on an interracial family, the Nowaks, this book touches on so many profound topics, from mental illness to intergenerational trauma to culture clash to the very question of what it means to be a family, all done in stunningly beautiful prose. Esmé and I had a great conversation about her book in the first segment, and in the second segment we chatted about our favorite social media platform: Twitter. (This episode was originally released on September 14, 2016. Conversation recorded July 19, 2016.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Esmé Weijun Wang Esmé Weijun Wang - The Border of Paradise Esmé Weijun Wang - The Collected Schizophrenias The Rawness of Remembering guided e-course (33% off with coupon code GOODBYE2020) Esmé Weijun Wang - With Love and Squalor (e-letter) Heather Havrilesky - Ask Polly Esmé Weijun Wang - “You Are Not Lazy” Esmé Weijun Wang - “I’m Chronically Ill and Afraid of Being Lazy” (elle.com) Esmé Weijun Wang - “Why My Novel Uses Untranslated Chinese” (lithub.com) Junot Díaz - The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Jordanna Kalman is a fine art photographer who lives and works in New York. Jordanna’s work explores loneliness, femininity and individuality, and the images are highly personal. In her series Little Romances, she rephotographs prints of earlier images of hers which had been stolen and misused. By considering the prints as objects and adding new elements, she creates a new narrative, examining the anxieties of being a woman and creating a form of protection for the image. In our conversation we discussed prints as still-life subjects, what anger can accomplish, and our mutual dislike of “mean” photography. Then in the second segment we discussed a recent Instagram dust-up between two photographers, and how it’s relevant to our larger society. (Conversation recorded October 21, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Jordanna Kalman Jordanna Kalman - Little Romances Purchase books and prints from Jordanna Kalman’s online shop 2018 Critical Mass Top 50 Speax - “Jordanna Kalman - Artist & Photographer” Vik Muniz Joseph Beuys Fotofilmic Laura Letinsky Keep the Channel Open - Episode 114: Jessica Eaton Bruce Gilden Martin Parr Rebecca Traister - Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger William Camargo John Divola William Camargo’s Instagram (@billythecamera) William Camargo’s IG post riffing on John Divola’s work John Divola - As Far As I Could Get Killing of Ahmaud Arbery PetaPixel - “Folded Map Project’s Tonika Johnson Confronts Alec Soth and the NY Times” Tonika Johnson - Folded Map Project The Phoblographer - “Martin Parr is Under Fire for a Photo Book Reprint He Edited in 2017” Keep the Channel Open - Episode 110: Maggie Tokuda-Hall Kazim Ali - The Voice of Sheila Chandra Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
For this installment of the KTCO Book Club, I’m joined by writer Alyssa Harad for a conversation about Tove Jansson’s 1982 novel The True Deceiver. Despite the slimness of the volume, Jansson’s novel yet contains a surprising degree of depth and complexity, not to mention psychological tension, in a story that challenges the reader to consider the nature of truth, honesty, and different forms of deception. (Conversation recorded September 22, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Tove Jansson - The True Deceiver Alyssa Harad Alyssa Harad - Coming to My Senses: A Story of Perfume, Pleasure, and an Unlikely Bride #KTCOBookClub on Twitter Moomin Ali Smith Tove Jansson - The Summer Book Flannery O’Connor Eudora Welty Sherwood Anderson - Winesburg, Ohio Keep the Channel Open - Episode 113: Matthew Salesses Tove Jansson - Fair Play William Faulkner - The Sound and the Fury Christiane Ritter - A Woman in the Polar Night Tove Jansson - Moominland Midwinter Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Maggie Smith is a poet and essayist based in Bexley, Ohio. Maggie’s new book Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity, and Change was born out of a difficult life change; it both discusses and is an example of resilience and hope in the face of an unknown future. In our conversation, we talked about the book’s origins in a series of social media notes-to-self, about becoming an essayist after having been a poet for so long, and about finding agency through language. Then for the second segment, we talked about community and connection via social media. (Conversation recorded September 10, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Maggie Smith Maggie Smith - Keep Moving Literati Books - At Home With Literati - Maggie Smith & Molly Spencer (October 8, 2020) Books Are Magic - Maggie Smith: Keep Moving w/ Rebecca Soffer (October 14, 2020) Gramercy Books - A Virtual Conversation about Resilience: Maggie Smith and Saeed Jones (October 15, 2020) Maggie Smith - Upcoming Events Keep the Channel Open - Episode 49: Maggie Smith Maggie Smith - Good Bones Maggie Smith - “At Your Age I Wore a Darkness” Maggie Smith - “Tracking the Demise of My Marriage on Google Maps” (NYT Modern Love) Sabrina Orah Mark - “Happily” (The Paris Review) Angel Olsen - Whole New Mess Tove Jansson - The True Deceiver (upcoming KTCO Book Club pick) Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
In the inaugural KTCO Book Club episode I’m joined by writer and podcaster David Naimon, host of the literary podcast Between the Covers. For our conversation, David selected Teju Cole and Fazal Sheikh’s hybrid photo/prose book Human Archipelago. In their collaboration, Cole’s writing and Sheikh’s images support each other in a way that expands the form of the traditional photobook and provides a potent exploration of human migration, national boundaries, imperialism, the connections between people, and our responsibilities to one another. (Recorded September 2, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Teju Cole & Fazal Sheikh - Human Archipelago Between the Covers Between the Covers Patreon Teju Cole Fazal Sheikh Keep the Channel Open - Episode 114: Jessica Eaton Keep the Channel Open - Episode 103: Philipp Scholz Rittermann Keep the Channel Open - Episode 80: Jerry Takigawa Keep the Channel Open - Episode 81: Mike Sakasegawa Teju Cole - On Photography (New York Times Magazine column) Steidl Verlag Teju Cole - “A Too-Perfect Picture” Between the Covers - Philip Metres : Shrapnel Maps Sharon Mizota - “Review: ‘Human Archipelago’ shines light on refugees and our shared humanity” The Family of Man Tanvi Misra - “A New Way of Seeing the Global Migration Crisis” Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black-and-White Negatives Walker Evans Dorothea Lange Keep the Channel Open - Episode 77: Brandon Thibodeaux Teju Cole - Open City Between the Covers - Molly Crabapple : Brothers of the Gun — A Memoir of the Syrian War Between the Covers - Joe Sacco : Paying the Land Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
David Adjmi is a writer and playwright based in Los Angeles, CA. In his new memoir Lot Six, David tells the story of how he found himself through art and the theater, growing up feeling like an outsider as a gay, atheist, artistic youth in a small and insular Syrian Sephardic Jewish community in Brooklyn. In our conversation, David and I discussed the craft of memoir, the process of constructing one’s own identity, and why his book isn’t structured like the typical gay narrative. Then in the second segment, we discussed how the pandemic is affecting our ability to make narratives, and how art can function as a community. (Conversation recorded August 31, 2019.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: David Adjmi Purchase Lot Six (bookshop.org) Review Lot Six on Goodreads Elizabeth Hardwick - Sleepless Nights Richard Wright - Black Boy Melissa Febos San Diego Union-Tribune - “Commentary: In the COVID-19 era, I have to tell my patients they are experiencing authentic fear” L’Avventura Keep the Channel Open - Episode 33: José Olivarez Neutral Milk Hotel - “In the Aeroplane Over the Sea” I May Destroy You Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Jessica Eaton is a photographer based in Montreal, Quebec. At first glance, the minimalist compositions in Jessica’s images might seem simple, but the process behind their creation is anything but. Using a series of color filters and a painstaking multiple exposure technique, she is able to use light to construct color. In our conversation, we discussed her photographic technique, her impulse toward iteration, and why her work is not abstract. Then in the second segment we talked about coming to big life changes during a pandemic. (Conversation recorded August 3, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Jessica Eaton Jessica Eaton - That is Picture (short doc) M+B Gallery - Jessica Eaton Higher Pictures Gallery - Jessica Eaton Luminous Landscape - “Profile: The Relentless Jessica Eaton” Keep the Channel Open - Episode 56: Chris Engman Bruce Gilden TransformerStation - Jessica Eaton interview Dolly zoom Akinetopsia Sally Mann - Hold Still: A Memoir with Photographs Georgiana Houghton, Hilam AF Kint, Emma Kunz - World Receivers Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Matthew Salesses is a writer based in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Matthew’s new novel, Disappear Doppelgänger Disappear, is darkly funny, unsettling in the best way, and wholly original, the story of a Korean American man struggling simply to exist as he feels himself literally disappearing. In our conversation, Matthew and I discussed his book, the trap of the first-person perspective, and what it means to take responsibility. Then in the second segment, we talked about the meaning of love. (Conversation recorded July 8, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Matthew Salesses Matthew Salesses - Disappear Doppelgänger Disappear Thank You Books - Author Event: Laura Van Den Berg in conversation with Matthew Salesses (August 20, 2020) Prairie Lights - Reading: Matthew Salesses and Lyz Lenz (August 27, 2020) Belmont Books - Virtual Event: Margot Lives and Matthew Salesses (September 16, 2020) Review Disappear Doppelgänger Disappear: Amazon | Goodreads Julio Cortázar Matthew Salesses - Love and Silence (Catapult column) Matthew Salesses - “What Does It Mean to Write Asian American Literature?” David Eng & Shinhee Han - “A Dialogue on Racial Melancholia” Han Kang - The Vegetarian Margot Livesey - The House on Fortune Street Olga Tokarczuk - Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead Byung-Chul Han - The Agony of Eros Kahlil Gibran - “On Marriage” Jacques Lacan Lyz Lenz - Belabored: A Vindication of the Rights of Pregnant Women Elisa Gabbert - The Unreality of Memory Margot Livesey - The Boy in the Field Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Ross Sutherland is a writer and podcaster based in Peterborough, UK. Ross’s podcast Imaginary Advice is one of my favorites in any genre. Blending poetry, essay, and audio fiction with a wonderfully experimental approach to sound design, Imaginary Advice sounds like nothing else. In our conversation, Ross and I talked about what it’s like to make a podcast without a format, why starting with form can lead to unexpected discovery, and what collaboration can open up for a project. Then in the second segment, Ross and I talked about his recent difficulties trying to learn yoga via YouTube. (Conversation recorded July 17, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Imaginary Advice Support Imaginary Advice on Patreon The Allusionist The Allusionist - Imaginary Advice: S.E.I.N.F.E.L.D. BBC - Radio 1 - John Peel Lunar Poetry Podcasts - Ep. 116 — Ross Sutherland & C.I Marshall OuLiPo Univocalic Imaginary Advice - 66 Exquisite Corpse (with Clive Desmond) Imaginary Advice - 50 Four or Five Weddings and One or Two Funerals Stand By For Tape Back-Up Tim Clare Florian Cramer - “Words Made Flesh” Alexander Technique David Berman David Berman & The Impossible Shapes - Bloomington, IN, 2005 David Berman - Actual Air David Berman Transcription Project Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Richard Georges is a writer, editor, and lecturer in the British Virgin Islands. In his second collection of poems, Giant, Richard gives us a portrait of the BVI through landscape, through its history and its present. In our conversation, Richard and I talked about his book, the aftermath of empire in the BVI, and the relationship between poetry and myth. For the second segment, Richard talked about the particular moment that the BVI faced in the wake of Hurricane Irma. (Conversation recorded June 12, 2018.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Richard Georges Richard Georges - Giant Richard Georges - Epiphaneia Richard Georges - Make Us All Islands Moko Percy Bysshe Shelley - “Ozymandias” Ramayana Saint Ursula Soucouyant Douen Derek Walcott Kamau Brathwaite Craig Santos Perez Craig Santos Perez - From Unincorporated Territory Shansi Miller Moko Magazine - Paintings by Shansi Miller Kei Miller - Augustown Shivanee Ramlochan Shivanee Ramlochan - Everyone Knows I Am a Haunting Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Mike Sakasegawa
Alanna Airitam is a portrait photographer based in San Diego, CA. In her series "The Golden Age," Alanna makes portraits of African Americans in the style of the Dutch Realism Golden Age of painting, images full of grace and beauty representing black people in a fine art context, a context from which they are all too often excluded. In our conversation we talked about that series, as well as her "Being Heard" project, which began as a response to seeing how different marginalized women were being excluded from the mainstream activist narrative. Then for the second segment, Alanna and I had a wide-ranging conversation about the roots of social injustice in our society. (Conversation recorded April 10, 2018.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Alanna Airitam Salt and Sugar Productions - Alanna Airitam: From Haarlem to Harlem Alanna Airitam - The Golden Age Alanna Airitam - Being Heard San Diego Art Institute - ABOUT-FACE Hamilton @medievalpoc on Twitter Bioneers Kirsten Imani Kasai Skyler McCurine Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Leah Huizar is a poet originally from Southern California. Leah’s collection Inland Empire juxtaposes personal history with California history, excavating different layers of colonialism and centering Mexican-American women. In our conversation, we talked about what it means to own or be of a place, the stories behind California history, and what parts of history we carry forward to the next generation. Then in the second segment, we discussed the value of creative endurance. (Conversation recorded May 14, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Leah Huizar Leah Huizar - Inland Empire LitHub - You can order today from these black-owned independent bookstores Las sergas de Esplandián Calafia Keep the Channel Open - Episode 87: David Bowles David Bowles - Feathered Serpent, Dark Heart of Sky Luis Alberto Urrea - The House of Broken Angels Ross Gay - Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
In solidarity with the ongoing protests against police violence, Keep the Channel Open is postponing our regular episode this week and participating in the #PodcastBlackout. Resources: National Bail Fund Network Campaign Zero Showing Up for Racial Justice Scene on Radio - Seeing White Robin DiAngelo - White Fragility Ijeoma Oluo - So You Want to Talk About Race Erika Lee - The Making of Asian America Transcript
Maggie Tokuda-Hall is a writer and podcaster based in San Francisco, CA. Maggie’s debut YA novel, The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea, is a swashbuckling pirate fantasy, and it’s also a nuanced and subversive story about colonialism, the power of storytelling, and the cost of violence. In our conversation, Maggie and I talked about her love of working in multiple forms and genres, the presentation of race in her novel, and writing the horrificness of violence. Then in the second segment, we discussed how to talk to our kids about problematic books and authors. (Conversation recorded April 29, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Maggie Tokuda-Hall Maggie Tokuda-Hall - The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea Maggie Tokuda-Hall - Also an Octopus Drunk Safari Maggie Tokuda-Hall - Fear and Loathing in Utero (Catapult) Maggie Tokuda-Hall - “On Violations, Macarons, and the Pursuit of Beauty I Can Control” Patrick Ness - The Knife of Never Letting Go Barbara Park - Junie B. Jones Lynne Reid Banks - The Indian in the Cupboard Nicole Chung - “E. B. White’s Lesson for Debut Writers: It’s Okay to Start Small“ F Troop James S. A. Corey Never Have I Ever Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Sarah Gailey is a writer based in Los Angeles, CA. Sarah’s latest novel, the YA fantasy When We Were Magic, is a wonderful story about teen friendship, magic, and queer love. In our conversation, we talked about the importance of representation and sensitivity edits, writing YA that respects teens, and how it’s okay to take up space in one’s relationships. Then for the second segment, we talked about something that’s been on all of our minds lately: food. (Conversation recorded April 21, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Sarah Gailey Sarah Gailey - When We Were Magic Sarah Gailey - Upright Women Wanted Sarah Gailey - Magic for Liars Sarah Gailey - Here’s the Thing (newsletter) DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince - “Parents Just Don’t Understand” Schitt’s Creek Sarah Gailey - “Impostor/Abuser: Power Dynamics in Publishing” Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn Maggie Tokuda-Hall - The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
Sarah Gailey is a writer based in Los Angeles, CA. Sarah’s latest novel, the YA fantasy When We Were Magic, is a wonderful story about teen friendship, magic, and queer love. In our conversation, we talked about the importance of representation and sensitivity edits, writing YA that respects teens, and how it’s okay to take up space in one’s relationships. Then for the second segment, we talked about something that’s been on all of our minds lately: food. (Conversation recorded April 21, 2020.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Review on Apple Podcasts | Review on Podchaser Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Sarah Gailey Sarah Gailey - When We Were Magic Sarah Gailey - Upright Women Wanted Sarah Gailey - Magic for Liars Sarah Gailey - Here’s the Thing (newsletter) DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince - “Parents Just Don’t Understand” Schitt’s Creek Sarah Gailey - “Impostor/Abuser: Power Dynamics in Publishing” Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn Maggie Tokuda-Hall - The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo
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Podcast Details

Created by
Mike Sakasegawa
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Jan 27th, 2016
Latest Episode
Apr 7th, 2021
Release Period
2 per month
Episodes
145
Avg. Episode Length
About 1 hour
Explicit
Yes
Order
Episodic
Language
English
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