Let's Go To Court!

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Picture it. Sicily. 1963. Franca Viola was 15 years old, and engaged to a mafia member named Filippo Melodia. When Filippo went to jail for theft, Franca broke off the engagement. She moved on with her life. She became engaged to a childhood friend. Life seemed pretty good, until Filippo came back into the picture. He stalked her. He threatened her. Then, he and a band of douchebags stormed her family’s home. They beat up her mother. They kidnapped Franca, and her little brother, too. Filippo held Franca captive for eight days. He sexually assaulted her many times. He was pretty pleased with himself. After all, in those days, that meant he’d found a bride.Then Brandi tells us a story about Paul Warner Powell, the biggest idiot to walk the planet. In January of 1999, Paul was a 20-year-old self described neo nazi who had a crush on his 16-year-old neighbor, Stacie Reed. One day when Paul was over at Stacie’s house, he became incensed to find out that her boyfriend was black. He attempted to rape Stacie, then murdered her as she fought back. Paul went on to commit more crimes against Stacie’s family that day. At one point, he thought he’d gotten away with everything. So he began bragging.  And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.In this episode, Kristin pulled from:“A brave young woman fought a centuries-old cruel Sicilian tradition and won,” by E. L. Hamilton for The Vintage NewsThe book, “Italian Sketches: The Faces of Modern Italy,” by Deirdre Pirro“Franca Viola says ‘No’” by Daisy Alioto for Mashable“Franca Viola” entry on WikipediaIn this episode, Brandi pulled from:“Paul Warner Powell” imsurroundedbyidiots.com “Paul Warner Powell” clarkprosecutor.org “Inmate Lands Back on Death Row for Taunting Letter He Sent to Prosecutors” lifedaily.com “Death-row defense argues double jeopardy” The Washington Times“Powell v. Kelly” findlaw.com
Warning: This is an especially explicit episode. Blame Denver Fenton Allen. Brandi starts us off with an absolutely insane pre-trial hearing unlike anything you’ve ever heard of. Denver Fenton Allen’s went a little nuts in his pre-trial hearing. He accused everyone of wanting to “suck his dick.” Then, when it was clear things weren’t going his way, he threatened to murder the judge’s family and mastrubate in open court. The judge didn’t handle it well.     Then, who could forget the story of astronaut Lisa Nowak? When Lisa’s astronaut boyfriend Billy dumped her for another woman, she — how do we put this mildly? — didn’t take it well. She loaded up her car with trash bags, a knife, a steel mallet and other fun travel accessories, then drove from Houston to Orlando wearing a diaper. Once she got to Orlando, she attacked Billy’s new girlfriend, Colleen Shipman.  For what it’s worth, Lisa denies wearing the diaper. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Astronaut Charged With Attempted Murder,” The New York Times “Ex-Astronaut Wants Evidence Tossed Out,” Associated Press “Astronaut Love Triangle: Colleen Shipman Says of 2007 Attack by Romantic Rival, ‘I Thought I “Was Going to Be Okay. But It Was Never Okay After That,’” People Magazine “Astronaut Love Triangle: Lisa Nowak’s Life 10 Years Later,” People Magazine Plus, good ol’ wikipedia In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “Proctor calls Floyd County Jail death a homicide” by Doug Walker, Rome News-Tribune “Cartersville man charged in Floyd County Jail inmate death” by Doug Walker, Rome News-Tribune “Georgia v. Denver Fenton Allen” transcript of proceedings Fay Frankland “Judge criticized for vulgar courtroom exchange” by Bill Rankin, Atlanta Journal Constitution “Man who gained fame for crude “Rick and Morty” courtroom exchange gets life” by Joshua Rhett Miller, New York Post
When Jim Hildenbrand moved to the Avignon Villas in Olathe, Kansas, he thought he’d found the perfect place to live. But pretty soon, he started butting heads with the neighborhood’s home owners association. Then one day, he did the unthinkable. He installed some unapproved landscaping. What followed was a costly, lengthy legal battle that epitomized first world problems. Be ready to clutch your pearls. But they can’t all be lawsuits about landscaping. This week, Brandi tells about the hunt for Jennifer Jackson’s murderer. Her murder appeared so deeply personal that police quickly zeroed in on Jennifer’s teenage daughter, Noura. But did they catch Jennifer’s actual murderer? And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Olathe man’s war with HOA over landscaping: $400,000 at stake,” the Kansas City Star “Church deacon’s relative has cancer, but HOA says he can’t park extra car in driveway,” the Kansas City Star “$400,000 case pitting Olathe man, HOA needs more work, court rules,” the Kansas City Star In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “My Mother’s Murder” episode, 48 Hours “She Was Convicted of Killing Her Mother.  Prosecutors Withheld the Evidence That Would Have Freed Her.” by Emily Bazelon, New York Times  
Nancy Howard just wanted a quiet night at home. She pulled into the garage of her upscale home, got out of her car, and was about to head inside for dinner when an armed gunman grabbed her by the neck. The pair struggled. He shot her and left her for dead. But Nancy survived. Investigators were perplexed by the crime, but soon, the pieces came together. It was even stranger than they’d initially suspected. Then Brandi tells us about infamous teenaged spree killer Charles Starkweather. In just two months, Charles killed eleven people. His underaged girlfriend was with him the entire time. Starkweather’s horrific crimes won a place in pop culture. The crimes inspired the film Natural Born Killers, a truly terrible Bruce Springsteen song, and were mentioned in Billy Joel’s, “We didn’t start the fire.” And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “How to not get away with murder” by Michael J Mooney for D Magazine An episode of the podcast Swindled “‘They got you, didn’t they?’ Denton County woman tells prison-bound ex who tried to have her killed,” The Dallas Morning News “Love affair takes center stage in Carrollton murder-for-hire trial,” NBCDFW.com “Appeal denied in John Howard case,” Carrollton Leader “Trial begins for alleged hit man hired by North Texas man convicted of plotting to kill wife,” MySanAntonio.com In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “Charles Starkweather and Caril Fugate” by Marilyn Bardsley, Crime Library “Charles Raymond Starkweather” murderpedia.org “The Killing Spree that Transfixed a Nation: Charles Starkweather and Caril Fugate, 1958” by Lesley Wischmann, WyoHistory.org “Charles Starkweather And Caril Fugate Trials: 1958” encyclopedia.com  
Kelli Peters was the heart of Plaza Vista School in Irvine, California. She was the PTA president and the volunteer director of the after school program. But then, one day, as she was filling in for a teacher, a police officer said he needed to speak with her. He took her out to the parking lot and asked for her car keys. Kelli was puzzled, but she handed them over. The officer dug through her car, and eventually pulled out a bag of pot, a pipe, some Percocet and some Vicodin. Kelli dropped to her knees. She sobbed. She pleaded with the officer. The drugs weren’t hers, she said. But if they weren’t hers, then why the hell were they in Kelli’s car?   Then Kristin talks about two things she knows inside and out: fine wine, and the perils of having millions of dollars in spending money. In the early 2000’s, Rudy Kurniawan was just a young, geeky-looking guy bidding on California wines at high-end wine auctions. Hardly anyone paid attention to him. But then his bids got bigger. And bigger. He spent millions on wine, and then began selling it. But over time, the people who bought his wines got suspicious. The wines didn’t taste quite right. And some of the labels looked a little funny. Had they been duped? And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Chateau Sucker,” by Benjamin Wallace for New York Magazine The documentary “Sour Grapes” “Prosecutors reveal evidence against accused wine counterfeiter,” Wine Spectator “Counterfeit fine-wine dealer sentenced to 10 years,” Wall Street Journal “Kurniawan to tell all in $3M settlement with billionaire Koch, as sentencing is delayed,” Decanter “Rudy Kurniawan’s court date is set,” Wine Spectator “Alleged counterfeit wines go on trial,” Wine Spectator In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “Framed: A Mystery in Six Parts” by Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times “Former Irvine attorney convicted of planting drugs in the car of PTA volunteer disbarred” by Sean Emery, The Orange County Register “Jury awards $5.7 million to Irvine PTA mom in drug-planting case” by Kelly Puente and Sean Emery, The Orange County Register “Irvine mom Kelli Peters writes book about drugs being planted in her car” by Kelly Puente, The Orange County Register  
It’s divorce week! In this episode, we’ll talk about Kim Kardashian’s two divorces and we’ll hear about a guy who *really* didn’t want a divorce.It was 1988 and Susan Walters was ready for love. So she placed a personal ad in the Willamette Week. Her ad read, in part, “SWF, 33, overweight but not over life, seeks SM who wants more out of a relationship than just “slender.” Her ad went on to describe herself as an adventurous, active health care professional. That caught the attention of Mike Kuhnhausen. The pair hit it off immediately, and were married a short time later. But over the course of many years, the couple grew apart. Mike’s negative outlook on life didn’t mesh well with Susan’s sunny personality. After 17 years of marriage, Susan asked for a divorce. But Mike didn’t like that idea. Then Kristin wraps things up with the stories of Kim Kardashian’s two divorces. When she was just 19 years old and high on ecstasy, Kim and 29-year-old music producer Damon Thomas eloped in Las Vegas. Their marriage lasted just a few years. In documents that have since been made public, Kim alleged that Damon was physically and emotionally abusive. Damon denied physically abusing Kim. A few years later, Kim met NBA player Kris Humphries. The pair’s highly publicized, star-studded wedding drew international attention. But the wedding lasted just 72 days. The divorce, however, lasted almost two years. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from:“Exclusive: Kim Kardashian’s divorce scenes on ‘KUWTK’ were reshot and scripted” by Chantal Waldholz for Life and Style Magazine“Kim K/Kris H officially divorced,” TMZ“Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries divorce timeline,” US Magazine“Kanye bought his first phone because of Kris Humphries,” Kocktails with Khloe clip on YouTube“I never wanted to be that guy,” by Kris Humphries for the Players Tribune“In Touch Exclusive Interview: Kim Kardashian ex-husband tells all,” In Touch Weekly“Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries Wedding was 7 Years Ago: Remembering Their 72-Day Marriage,” by Natalie Stone for People Magazine“He punched me in the face and told me I needed liposuction: Kim Kardashian’s marriage hell revealed for first time,” Daily Mail“Kris Humphries talks marriage to Kim Kardashian, ‘brutal’ divorce: ‘I was in a dark place’” by Sara Moniuszko for USA Today“The Dark Secrets Behidn Kim Kardashian’s First Marriage that Everyone Forgot About,” byChelsea Leary for Showbiz CheatSheetIn this episode, Brandi pulled from:“A Hit Man Came to Kill Susan Kuhnhausen. She Survived. He Didn’t.” by Beth Slovic, Willamette Week“Intended Murder Victim Has Her Day In Court” The Oregonian“Woman Who Strangles Attacker Wins $1 Million From Estranged Husband” by Kathleen Glanville, The Oregonian“Portlander Michael Kuhnhausen, who hired hitman to kill wife (she strangled him), dies in prison” by Bryan Denson, The Oregonian“No Bigger Gamble” episode Who the (Bleep) Did I Marry“Susan/John and Jean/Penny” episode I Survived
In the summer of 1945, the USS Indianapolis was tasked with a top secret mission. The ship was to transport materials for the atomic bomb that the United States would later drop on Hiroshima, Japan. Under the leadership of Captain Charles B. McVay III, the ship accomplished its mission. From there, the ship headed off to Guam, and then to the Philippines. But before they left for the Philippines, Captain McVay requested a destroyer escort. The USS Indianapolis didn’t have submarine detection equipment, but destroyer escorts did. His request was denied. So, off he sailed into submarine infested waters.Then Brandi tells us the story of the Caffey family murders. Terry Caffey woke up to a blast, riddled with bullets. Two men were in his bedroom. They had guns. One had a samurai sword. The men murdered his wife, Penny, and left Terry for dead. Soon, Terry smelled smoke. The men had set his house on fire. Nearly dead but desperate to get help, Terry found the strength to get himself to a neighbor’s house. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.In this episode, Kristin pulled from:www.ussindianapolis.org“Captain, once a scapegoat, is absolved,” by David Stout for the New York Times“USS Indianapolis sinking: ‘You could see sharks circling’” by Alex Last for the BBC“USS Indianapolis,” entry on Wikipedia“Charles B. McVay III,” entry on WikipediaIn this episode, Brandi pulled from:“Flesh and Blood” by Pamela Colloff, Texas Monthly“Father Uses Family Massacre to Help Others” by David Lohr, AOLNews“Girl, 17, Gets 2 Life Terms In Family Slay” Associated Press, CBSNews“Family Slaughtered for Teen Love” episode Dr. Phil“Erin Caffey” episode Killer Women with Piers Morgan 
This week, Kristin starts us off with a case that’s as awful as it is important. Emmett Till was just fourteen years old in 1955, when he traveled from his home in Chicago to visit relatives in rural Mississippi. Before he left, his mother warned Emmett that Chicago and Mississippi were two different worlds. The culture was different -- the racism more intense. He’d have to be careful. But no warning could prepare Emmett for what lay ahead of him in Mississippi.  Then Brandi tells us the infuriating, but ultimately positive story of Cyntoia Brown. From the moment she was born, Cyntoia faced incredible obstacles. By the time she was a teenager, Cyntoia had been sex trafficked by an older man. When she was 16, a 43-year-old real estate broker named Johnny Michael Allen approached her in a Sonic, looking for sex. The two went back to his house, where Cyntoia felt increasingly afraid.  And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.In this episode, Kristin pulled from:“Emmett Till Murder Trial” by Douglas O. Linder for famous-trials.com“Emmett Till” entry on wikipedia“What happened to the key figures in the Emmett Till case?” by Devery S. Anderson for the Mississippi Clarion LedgerIn this episode, Brandi pulled from:“A timeline of the Cyntoia Brown case, conviction and successful bid for clemency” by Jon Garcia, The Tennessean“Who was Cyntoia Brown convicted of killing? A look at Johnny Allen.” by Jon Garcia, The Tennessean“Read Cyntoia Brown-Long's note to her 16-year-old self facing life in prison” by Juan Buitrago, The Tennessean“Cyntoia Brown wasn’t a victim, stole money after killing Johnny Allen: Prosecutors” by Christal Hayes, Newsweek“Cyntoia Brown, a trafficking victim jailed for killing a man using her for sex, was granted clemency following a social-media campaign. Here's everything you need to know.” by Benjamin Goggin, Insider“How The Justice System Failed Cyntoia Brown” by Leah Carroll, Refinery29“Attorneys seek new trial for teenage killer” Associated Press, The Oklahoman“Cyntoia Denise Brown v.  State of Tennessee” tncourts.gov “Cyntoia Brown Is Getting Back The Childhood She & So Many Young Black Girls Never Had” by Clarissa Brooks, Bustle“Cyntoia Brown” wikipedia.org “Cyntoia Brown” episode ExpediTIously Podcast
Happy Halloween, and welcome to a very spooky episode of Let’s Go To Court! This week, we discuss crimes so terrifying that they inspired horror films. Kristin starts us off with the most disgusting story of all time. Ed Gein was just a quiet bachelor who lived alone on his isolated Wisconsin farm. But there was more to Ed than met the eye. When police went to question him about a murder, they were horrified by what they discovered. Body parts littered his filthy home. There were lamp shades and chairs made of human skin. There was a collection of noses, and face masks on the walls. Ed’s story is so sickening that it inspired the movies Psycho, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and The Silence of the Lambs. Then Brandi tells us about an entire family who was killed in their sleep. Well… not an entire family. One family member, Ronald DeFeo, lived to tell the tale. A year later, a new family moved into the home. The disturbing story was the basis for the Amityville Horror movies. Brandi recommends the 2005 Amityville Horror remake, starring Ryan Reynolds. She’s a fan of his muscle definition. And his acting. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Ed Gein,” episode of A&E’s biography “Ed Gein Biography,” Wisconsinsickness.com “The Ultimate Ghoul,” Crime Library “10 skulls found in house of horror,” Oshkosh Daily Northwestern “Judge orders Ed Gein back to mental hospital,” The La Crosse Tribune “Order Ed Gein tried on murder, robbery,” The Oshkosh Northwestern “Ed Gein found guilty of murder,” Ironwood Daily Globe “Ed Gein,” Wikipedia In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “The Real Life Amityville Horror” by Douglas B Lynott, Cirme Library “Couple and 4 children killed in ‘Amityville Horror’ murders” by Jerry Schmetterer and Daniel Driscoll Ronald Defeo Jr. “The Amityville Horror” wikipedia.org AmityvilleFiles.com
Kristin starts us off with one of the trials of the Scottsboro Boys, a group of nine African American boys and young men who were accused of gang raping two white women in 1931. Their cases are infuriating and upsetting. The Scottsboro Boys were nearly lynched before their trials. At every turn, the justice system was unjust — so unjust that outside groups stepped in to help the young men. Then Brandi lightens things up with a story about the dangers of high school cheerleading. Wanda Holloway always wanted to be a cheerleader, but her dad wouldn’t let her. So when Wanda gave birth to her daughter Shanna, she knew exactly what Shanna would grow up to be — a cheerleader! But when it looked like another girl might take Shanna’s spot on the squad, Wanda did what any concerned parent would do. She hired a hitman. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Scottsboro Boys,” Famous-trials.com “Who were the Scottsboro Boys?”, PBS.org Scottsboro Boys, wikipedia In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “The Cheerleader Murder Plot” by Mimi Swartz, Texas Monthly “Cheerleader Plot Tape: Go For It” by Janet Cawley, Chicago Tribune “The Texas Cheerleader Case: A Daughter’s Painful Memory” by Anne Land and Kristen Mascia, People Magazine “Wanda Holloway Trial: 1991” encyclopedia.com “The Pom-Pom Hit: When Texas Was Struck By a Cheerleader Mom’s Murder Plot” by Jake Rossen, Mental Floss
We’re celebrating April Fools’ Day with some of our favorite pranks and hoaxes. Brandi starts us off by talking about Balloon Boy. This is the story of the six year old boy who floated off in his dad’s flying saucer. Or did he? This story captivated the nation, but if you’re anything like us, you’ll have forgotten like 95% of it. Then Kristin talks about three pranks that ended in lawsuits. There’s the waitress who was promised a Toyota, but given a toy Yoda. Then there’s the civil servant whose co-workers duped him into thinking he had a looming deadline. The poor guy cut his vacation short. He even developed heart palpitations. We end with a woman who spent five days thinking a criminal was stalking her. You’ll never guess who was behind the prank. Seriously. You’ll absolutely never guess. It’s insane. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Office joke backfires, city bans more pranks,” The Globe and Mail “City hall boss on stress leave after prank” London Free Press “Three top city managers named in Howlett prank” London Free Press “Court Approves Lawsuit Against Toyota Over Cyberstalking Ad Stunt,” Wired.com “Toyota Loses a Marketing Lawsuit in Ruling That May Chill Advertiser Pranks,” CBS News “Woman Sues Toyota Over ‘Terrifying’ Prank,” ABC News “Saatchi Sued Over “Terror Marketing Campaign” for Toyota,” CBS News “Former Hooters waitress settles toy Yoda suit,” USA Today In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “The Ballad of Balloon Boy” by Justin Peters, Slate.com “Doubts Came Early in Balloon Incident” by Brian Stelter and Dan Frosch “Heene family says ‘balloon boy’ headlines ‘wasn’t a hoax’” by Elizabeth Murray, Today.com
Jennifer Morey Caldwell was a cautious person. So when she picked out her apartment complex, she chose the Bayou Park Apartments. She was a young lawyer living alone in Houston, Texas, so she was drawn to the complex’s 24-hour security. The apartment complex was protected by Pinkerton Security. She’d heard of them. Surely they’d keep her safe.  Then, Kristin wraps things up with the explosive story of Olestra. Those of us who lived through the 90’s remember Frito-Lay’s Wow brand of chips. They were made using the chemical Olestra, which worked as a fat substitute. It was amazing! The chips tasted great! They had hardly any fat! There was just one tiny problem. They caused anal leakage. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Nutrition group seeks warning labels for olestra,” by Bruce Mohl for The Boston Globe “Frito-Lay agrees to label fake fat Olestra more clearly on its “Light” chips,” article by the Center for Science in the Public Interest Notice of intent to sue from the Center for Science in the Public Interest to Frito-Lay “Frito-Lay target of Olestra lawsuit,” article by the Center for Science in the Public Interest “Olestra: A Leaky History,” portablepress.com “FDA says Proctor & Gamble free to use fake fat,” medicinenet.com “Frito-Lay’s Wow chips hit Hoosiers hard,” press release by the Center for Science in the Public Interest In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “False Sense of Security” by Steve McVicker, Houston Press “Jennifer/Sampson/Norina” episode I Survived  
Ten years ago, Skechers Shape-Ups took the world by storm. The shoes were a miracle. They melted our fat, sculpted our hips buns and thighs. And the best part? We didn’t have to do any extra work. All we had to do was put on a pair of Skechers Shape-Ups, and BOOM! Instant workout! Except… well, the shoes didn’t quite live up to the hype.Then Brandi tells us an alarming tale (doesn’t she always?). When Tina Herrmann didn’t show up for work one day, her boss immediately sensed that something was up. She went to Herrmann’s home, broke in, and discovered a grisly scene. There was blood everywhere. Tina, her two children, and her friend Stephanie Sprang were missing. Investigators rushed to the scene. The clues led back to a man named Matthew Hoffman, whose home was filled with leaves.And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.In this episode, Kristin pulled from:“Skechers will pay $40 million over claims that its sneakers toned muscles,” by Ashley Lutz for Business Insider“Skechers Shape-Ups lawsuit: Woman sues saying ‘toning shoes’ caused hip fractures” by Elisabeth Leamy for ABC News“Skechers to pay $40 million for exaggerated shoe claims,” by Brett Barrouquere for the Christian Science Monitor In this episode, Brandi pulled from:“Killer Stuffed His House With Leaves, Kept Kidnapped Girl on Bed of Leaves” by Jessica Hopper, ABC News“What was in the home (and mind) of Matthew Hoffman?” by Allison Manning and Holly Zachariah, The Columbus Dispatch“Excerpts from Matthew Hoffman’s confession” The Columbus Dispatch“Missing Ohio Trio Were Stabbed to Death; Bodies Found Stuffed in Hollowed Out Tree” by Dean Schabner, ABC News“Ohio town grieves; hollow tree that held 3 bodies removed” Associated Press“Matthew Hoffman, Ohio Killer Who Hid Bodies in Tree, Pleads Guilty” by Edecio Martinez, CBS News
Here’s a tip: When a member of your spouse’s family asks to stay with you, just say no. That’s the lesson Brandi took from the murder of millionaire Jacques Mossler. When his younger, “toothpaste model” wife, Candy, suggested they let her nephew Melvin move into their sprawling Houston home, Jacques said sure. But over time, Candy and her nephew got close. Too close. Then Kristin tells us about the bizarre kidnapping of stay-at-home-mom Quinn Gray. Her kidnapping panicked and perplexed her husband, Reid Gray. Reid was wealthy. Super wealthy. But the ransom note indicated that the kidnappers only wanted $50,000. Why so little? And why did the kidnappers let Quinn make so many phone calls? As Quinn’s kidnapping dragged on, the case got more and more strange. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Ransom” episode of Dateline “Withhold of adjudication: What everyone needs to know,” Florida Bar Association “Bizarre saga of fake kidnapping of Quinn Hanna Gray reaches quiet end in court,” Jacksonville.com “Ponte Vedra woman who faked kidnapping accused of violating probation,” Jacksonville.com “Nancy Grace Investigates: The Quinn Gray Tapes Part 2,” CNN.com In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “A Million Dollar Murder” by David Krajicek, Crime Library “Lust and Death on Key Biscayne” by Matt Schudel, Sun Sentinel “Melvin Powers is Dead at 68” by Douglas Martin, The New York Times
Brandi starts us off with a wrongful conviction story unlike any we’ve ever covered. When Scott Hornoff was put on trial for the murder of Victoria Cushman, he had every conceivable advantage. The prosecution didn’t rely on junk science. There were no faulty eye witnesses. He had good legal representation. He was a police officer. He is white. But that didn’t stop the jury from finding against him. Then Kristin tells us about the infamous chocolate candy murders. Back in the late 1800’s, a married woman named Cordelia Botkin met a married man named John Preston Dunning. Cordelia was immediately smitten. John was hot, smart, a great writer, and an all-around good time. The two immediately struck up an affair. After a few years, John broke the news that he was leaving Cordelia. He wanted to go back to his candy-loving wife. Cordelia decided to stop him.And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.In this episode, Kristin pulled from:“The heinous crimes of Cordelia Botkin,” by Heather Monroe on medium.com “Murder by mail: The story of San Francisco’s most infamous female prisoner,” by Katie Dowd for the San Francisco Chronicle“Candy from a stranger: The Cordelia Botkin Case of 1898,” by Thomas Duke in 1910, posted on historicalcrimedetective.com “Cordelia Botkin” entry on Wikipedia“Mrs. Cordelia Botkin pleads with her judges for her life,” Dec. 23, 1898, The San Francisco CallIn this episode, Brandi pulled from:“Tangled Up in Blue: The Scott Hornoff Story” by Seamus McGraw, The Crime Library“Jeffrey Scott Hornoff’s Murder Conviction Is Exposed As A Sham When The Real Killer Confesses” by Hans Sherrer, Justice Denied“Killer's confession frees convicted man” by The Associated Press“State v. Hornoff” casetext.com  
Anthony Burns was born into slavery in Stafford County, Virginia. Despite laws that forbade him to do so, he learned to write and read. He became a preacher. As he got older, there was one thing he wanted more than anything: Freedom. So he boarded a ship to Boston and escaped. For a while, Anthony lived as a free man. But his former “owner,” Colonel Charles F. Suttle Douchelord the Third, wanted Anthony back. Unfortunately, Charles had the law on his side. Then Brandi finally ends the suspense by wrapping up her two-part series on the Beatrice Six. In last week’s episode, she told us about 68-year-old widow Helen Wilson, who was discovered raped and murdered in her apartment in Beatrice, Nebraska. Police initially suspected Bruce Allen Smith, but a blood test ruled him out. The case grew cold. But then, a hog farmer and former police officer named Burdette Searcey stepped in. He was determined to solve the crime — by any means necessary. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Anthony Burns Trial of 1854,” www.famous-trials.com “Anthony Burns and the Fugitive Slave Act,” www.longroadtojustice.org “Anthony Burns,” PBS The book, “Boston slave riot, and trial of Anthony Burns” Wikipedia entries for Anthony Burns, Twelfth Baptist Church, Boston Vigilance Committee, Fugitive Slave Act of 185, and Franklin Pierce In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “Presumed Guilty Part Four: Pointing Fingers” by Catharine Huddle, Lincoln Journal Star “Presumed Guilty Part Five: Threat of Death” by Joe Duggan, Lincoln Journal Star “Presumed Guilty Part Six: The Trial” by Catharine Huddle, Lincoln Journal Star “Presumed Guilty Part Seven: DNA Changes Everything” by Joe Duggan, Lincoln Journal Star “Presumed Guilty Part Eight: A New Investigation” by Joe Duggan, Lincoln Journal Star “Memories of a Murder” by Rachel Aviv, The New Yorker “Even in 1989, forensics didn’t point to men and women who went to prison for crime” by Joe Duggan, Omaha World-Herald InnocenceProject.org  
Brandi starts us off with a story that’ll have you giving the side-eye to good looking white guys everywhere. This horrible crime began when a well-dressed, charming man walked into a Los Angeles high school and politely informed the school’s registrar that he needed to speak with a wealthy banker’s daughter. It only took a little persuasion for him to walk out of the school with 12-year-old Marion Parker. Soon, Parker’s family received ransom notes from a man who identified himself as “the fox.” He promised to return the girl alive — as long as the Parkers did as they were told. Then Kristin tells us about the longest and most expensive criminal trial in American history. It all started when a mother suspected that her toddler had been molested at daycare. Police immediately took action. They sent letters to the hundreds of parents whose children attended the daycare. Police indicated that the children at McMartin Preschool could have witnessed or been victims of a number of traumatic experiences, including child pornography, sodomy, and oral sex. The parents were horrified. A social worker interviewed 400 of the children. In the end, she found that nearly all of them had been abused. But did she really uncover abuse? Or were her interview methods lkjflawed? Had anything actually happened at McMartin Preschool? And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: McMartin Preschool case, famous-trials.com “The Longest Trial – A Post-Mortem,” New York Times “McMartin Preschool: Anatomy of a Panic,” New York Times (video) In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “Aggie and The Fox” by Joan Renner, DerrangedLACrimes.com “Girl’s Grisly Killing Had City Residents Up in Arms” by Cecilia Rasmussen, Los Angeles Times “The Murder of Marion Parker” by Mark Gribben, murderpedia.org “Edgar Rice Burroughs Reports on the Notorious 1928 Hickman Trial” erbzine.com  
It was the winter of 2014, and Sue Duncan and her husband Leo Fisher were settling in for a quiet night at home. Sue had a chicken roasting in the oven, and Leo was reading on his recliner. Then, the doorbell rang. Leo opened the door to find a man in a long black jacket at his doorstep. The man fired a Taser at Leo’s chest and barged into the couple’s home. The man said he was with the “Virginia SEC,” and that he was there to arrest Leo. Right away, Sue sensed she didn’t have the full story. Then, in the mid-90’s, Pepsi launched a new ad campaign. It was pretty simple. Every time you bought a Pepsi, you earned points. With those points, you could buy items from the Pepsi catalogue. To advertise Pepsi Points, Pepsi aired a commercial aimed at showing off all of their sweet swag. You could buy a t-shirt. A leather jacket. And, as a funny little twist, they ended the commercial by saying that Pepsi drinkers could buy a Harrier jet for 7,000,000 points. It was clearly a joke. At the time, Harrier jets were worth $33.8 million. Plus, they were only available for military use. But you know who didn’t think they were joking? A 21-year-old business student named John Leonard. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: The commercial itself, which is available on YouTube Leonard v. Pepsico, Inc., 88 F. Supp. 2d 116 (S.D.N.Y. 1999) “Pepsi Harrier Giveaway,” Snopes.com John Leonard, Plaintiff-appellant, v. Pepsico, Inc., Defendant-appellee, 210 F.3d 88 (2d Cir. 2000) “Pentagon: ‘Pepsi ad not the real thing.’” CNN.com In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “A Home Invasion, A Torture Session, One Lawyer Nearly Killing Another—The Gruesome November Night in One of Washington’s Wealthiest Suburbs.” by Jason Fagone, The Washingtonian “Ex-Lawyer Sentenced to 45 Years in Home Invasion, Torture Attack of Former Boss, His Wife” by David Culver, NBC Washington    
Amy Anderton was concerned. Her boyfriend, Logan Storm, *seemed* like a good guy. He was a middle school math teacher. He talked a lot about trust and positivity. But something seemed off. So one day, when Logan left for work, Amy snooped through Logan’s stuff. That’s when she came across a thumbdrive. She plugged it into her computer, opened it, and was horrified by what she saw — hundreds of images of child pornography. Then, Brandi tells us about high school student Tyler Hadley’s massive party. When Tyler first told his friends about his plan to throw a party, they were a little skeptical.Tyler wasn’t the party-throwing type. His parents were super strict. But Tyler was determined to throw a party, and that’s exactly what he did. Tons of kids showed up from all over the sleepy town of Port St. Lucie, Florida. They had so much fun that they didn’t notice that Tyler’s house was a crime scene. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Still claiming innocence, Logan Storm sentenced to eight years in prison on child porn, failure-to-appear convictions,” by Helen Jung for The Oregonian “Logan Storm slips ankle bracelet, flees hours after verdict on child porn charge,” by Helen Jung for The Oregonian “Child porn convict dumps monitor,” Statesman Journal “Former teacher, Logan Storm, sentenced to prison for possessing child pornography and failing to appear in court,” press release for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon “Jury finds former teacher Logan Storm not guilty of groping girls in public pool,” by Aimee Green for The Oregonian “Why did seven years pass before former teacher Logan Storm was tried for child molestation,” by Aimee Green for The Oregonian The “Weathering the Storm” episode of “Who The Bleep Did I Marry?” In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “Tyler Hadley’s Killer Party” by Nathaniel Rich, Rolling Stone “Best Friend ‘Ruined My Life’ When He Killed His Own Parents” by Sean Dooley, Jenner Smith, and Alexa Valiente, ABC News “Murder of Blake and Mary Jo Hadley” wikipedia.org        
Fatty Arbuckle was a star. He could act. He could sing. He could make an audience roar with laughter. By the 1910s, he was one of the highest paid actors, and among the most popular stars of silent films. It seemed like nothing could stop his shine. But then, following a weekend of partying at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco, his friend Virginia Rappe died. It wasn’t immediately clear why Virginia died, but her friend supplied the answer: Virginia had been raped and killed by one of America’s most beloved stars.Then Kristin tells us about the ultimate old-timey kidnapping. If your parents ever warned you about taking candy from strangers, this is why. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross and his six-year-old brother Walter were playing in their front yard when two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. The men offered to buy the boys candy and fireworks. Naturally, the boys jumped at the chance. The men took the boys on a long, winding ride. They stopped at a store, and gave Walter 25 cents to buy fireworks. But after Walter made his purchase, he came back outside to find that the men were gone. They’d taken Charley with them.And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.In this episode, Kristin pulled from:“Charley Ross: Efforts to induce Westervelt to confess — he says, ‘search the Catholic Institutions,’” The Tennessean“Among the missing: Charley Ross,” by Jay Robert Nash for The Tampa Tribune“A notorious 19th century kidnapping in Brooklyn,” by Michael Pollak for The New York Times“‘JonBenet’ case of its time — 1874,” by Jeff Gammage for The Philadelphia Inquirer“Little Charley Ross,” The St. Albans Advertiser“The story of Charley Ross,” ushistory.org“The disappearance of Charley Ross,” by Steven Casale for The Lineup  In this episode, Brandi pulled from:“Fatty Arbuckle and the Death of Virginia Rappe” by Denise Noe, The Crime Library“The Skinny on the Fatty Arbuckle Trial” by Gilbert King, Smithsonian“Roscoe Arbuckle” wikipedia.org
This week, we discuss video game lawsuits with our special guest, Norman Caruso, the Gaming Historian. How did we get the Gaming Historian on this little dog and pony show? It’s hard to say. It could be that he’s a huge fan of obscure podcasts. … or it could be that he’s Kristin’s husband. What can we say? It’s a gigantic mystery. In this episode, Kristin starts us off with Devin Moore, a teenager who shot two police officers and a 911 dispatcher. When the police finally caught up with him, he said, “Life is like a video game. Everybody’s got to die sometime.” That mindset left a lot of people asking whether violent video games were to blame for his murder spree. Then Norman brings us our only non-violent crime of the day when he tells the fascinating story of Atari Games vs Nintendo. This lawsuit focused on the very first unlicensed games for the Nintendo Entertainment System. Brandi wraps things up with Daniel Petric, the 16-year-old boy who shot his parents after they took away his copy of Halo 3. His defense attorney said that Daniel’s recent infection made him more susceptible to the game’s violent themes…. But we’re a little skeptical. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “The Rise and Fall of Video Gamings Most Vocal Enemy,” Kotaku “Court Rejects Appeal in Alabama Suit Blaming Game for Slayings,” WSFA “Grand Theft Auto Player Gets Death Penalty,” The Inquirer “Can a Video Game Lead to Murder?” CBS News “Driven to Kill?” People Magazine In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “Game Over For Teen Who Killed Mother Over Video Game” by Edecio Martinez, CBS News “17-year-old Accused of Killing Mother Over Halo 3 Video Game May Get Verdict Soon” by Marvin Fong, The Plain Dealer “Petric Sentenced to 23 Years To Life: Father Says Son Regrets Shooting Mother Over Halo 3 Video Game” by Jordan Cravens, The Morning Journal In this episode, Norman pulled from: “Game Over” by David Sheff A History of AT Games (http://mcurrent.name/atarihistory/at_games.html) Atari Games Corp v Nintendo http://digital-law-online.info/cases/24PQ2D1015.htm
Chandra Levy had her life together. She was an intern at the Federal Bureau of Prisons and was just a few days shy of graduating with a master’s degree in public administration. She had dreams of working for the FBI. Maybe the CIA. So when she suddenly went missing in early May of 2001, her parents were alarmed. Their alarm swelled when they learned that Chandra’d been having an affair with Congressman Gary Condit. Was Condit to blame for Chandra’s disappearance? Had he done something to her? Despite a damn good alibi, suspicion enveloped Condit. In the winter of 2000, two men terrorized Wichita, Kansas. Over a short period, their random crimes escalated. First they robbed a man. Then they shot a woman. Then, they raped and terrorized a group of five, twenty-something friends. The men murdered four of the five friends. The lone survivor lived through the ordeal when the killers’ bullet deflected off her barrette. She played dead, then sought help. Ultimately, her testimony helped put the men behind bars. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Who Killed Chandra Levy?” Washington Post investigative series by Sari Horwitz, Scott Higham, Sylvia Moreno Season 38, Episode 48 of 20/20 “Chandra Levy,” Wikipedia “Gary Condit,” Wikipedia In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “The Wichita Horror” by Denise Noe, Crime Library “True Crime: The Wichita Massacre” by Kara Kovalchik, MentalFloss.com “High court overturns death penalty sentences for Carr brothers, upholds conviction” by Sherman Smith, The Topeka Capital-Journal “Supreme Court restores death sentences in heinous Kansas murder spree” by Richard Wolf, USA Today  
If Martin Frankel had one thing, it was confidence. Confidence in his own intelligence. As a young adult, Martin wanted to get ahead in life. He figured the easiest way to do that was to get involved in a brokerage business. He studied as hard as he could. He amassed an impressive amount of book smarts. But there was one thing he didn’t have: Ethics. Then Kristin scars Brandi for life with the story of Sara McBurnett. Sara was driving toward San Jose International Airport with her little dog Leo in the passenger’s seat when an SUV cut them off. Sara accidentally hit the SUV’s bumper. The driver of the SUV jumped out of his car and ran over to Sara. She tried to apologize, but it was no use. The man was livid. Then, he reached into her car, grabbed Leo, and flung him into oncoming traffic. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Can a little dog’s death end the road rage plague?” by Jeffrey Page, The Record “Jailed killer of dog sues dog’s owner,” Associated Press “Dog’s killer gets 3-year sentence,” by Ron Harris, Associated Press “Dog’s death leads to howls of anger,” by Ray Delgado and Annie Nakao, San Francisco Examiner “Nothing new yet in dog traffic killing,” San Jose Mercury News “California road rage trial begins,” by Ron Harris, Associated Press “New evidence permitted in dog’s traffic death,” Associated Press “New evidence in animal cruelty case,” Associated Press “Judge hands maximum sentence to dog killer,” Washington Post “California court rejects appeal by dog killer,” CNN.com “Dog-killing case gets stranger as trial halts,” Los Angeles Times In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “Martin Frankel: Sex, Greed and $200 Million Fraud” by Rachael Bell, Crime Library “Billion-Dollar Vanishing Act?” by CBS News Staff, CBS News “The Martin Frankel Case” episode American Greed “17-Year Sentence Affirmed for Investor Who Looted Insurers” by The Associated Press, The New York Times  
Brandi starts us off with a story from her Johnson County, Kansas, bubble. Ed and Tyler Patton seemed like the perfect couple. In many ways, they were opposites. He was a partier, while she was more straightlaced. Their friends figured that Ed and Tyler’s differences were what made them a good match. But less than a year after they got married, Ed was murdered. Despite her many protests, Tyler seemed like the obvious culprit.Then Kristin tells us about legendary comedian and actress Carol Burnett. Carol is well known for being a hollywood trailblazer, but she’s also a trailblazer when it comes to fighting back against tabloids. It all started with a fun night out in January of 1976. Carol was out with some colleagues. She shared her dessert with a few nearby tables. On her way out, she said hello to Henry Kissinger. A few months later, when the National Enquirer wrote about Carol’s night out, they told an entirely different tale. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.In this episode, Kristin pulled from:“Burnett v. National Enquirer, Inc.” wikipedia“Carol Burnett sued The National Enquirer and won!” clip from John Fugelsang’s ‘Tell Me Everything’ show on SiriusXM“Burnett Wins Enquirer Suit,” by Jay Mathews for The Washington Post“Tabloid Law,” by Alex Beam for The Atlantic“Carol Burnett given $1.6 million in suit against National Enquirer,” by Robert Lindsey for The New York Times“Carol Burnett launches trial balloon,” by Vernon Scott for UPIIn this episode, Brandi pulled from:“Kansas Woman Brutally Beats Husband To Death With Wooden Plank” by Benjamin H. Smith, oxygen.com “Greed led wife to kill husband, jurors told” by The Associated Press, Lawrence Journal-World“State v. Patton” findlaw.com “Widow found guilty of murdering husband” The Associated Press, Lawrence Journal-World  
When Abraham Shakespeare won a $30 million lottery, he was ecstatic. He bought himself a beautiful home and a new car. He was generous with nearly everyone he encountered. When friends needed a loan, he gave it to them. When they fell behind on their mortgages, he stepped in. But Abraham was quickly overwhelmed. He worried that people were taking advantage of him. Then he met Dee Dee Moore. She was a savvy businesswoman who wanted to help him with his money. Or so she said. Later, when Abraham went missing, his friends and family had a hunch who was to blame. Then Kristin tells us about one of the dumbest lawsuits of all time. Peter Wallis and Kellie Smith were in love, but that all changed when Kellie got pregnant. Peter proposed. She said no. Peter encouraged her to get an abortion. She said no to that too. Then like a real winner, he kicked her out of their apartment. Kellie moved in with her parents and eventually gave birth to a baby girl. A year after their daughter was born, Peter sued Kellie, claiming she lied about being on the pill. Kellie said she had been on the pill, and that the pregnancy was as surprising to her as it was to him. Peter told the world he was a victim of “contraceptive fraud.” And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Judge tosses man’s suit over ex-lover’s pregnancy,” Albuquerque Journal “Dismissal of Lawsuit over pregnancy upheld,” Albuquerque Journal “Man sues his ex-girlfriend for becoming pregnant,” Washington Post In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “The Lady Killer” episode American Greed “Dee Dee Moore” episode Snapped “Dorice ‘Dee Dee’ Moore” murderpedia.org  
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Podcast Details

Started
Feb 27th, 2018
Latest Episode
Jul 22nd, 2020
Release Period
Weekly
No. of Episodes
133
Avg. Episode Length
About 2 hours
Explicit
Yes

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