Lit to Lens

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In the second episode of our "2021 Oscar Bait" season, the guys discuss "Nomadland". The nonfiction book, written by Jessica Bruder and published in 2017, was adapted for the screen in 2020. The film, written and directed by Chloé Zhao, stars Frances McDormand and debuted at the Venice and Toronto Films Festivals in September 2020. The conversation in this episodes ranges from the book's shortcomings to the adaptation's key differences, which include the creation of Fern as a main character, the clever filmmaking from Chloé Zhao, the incredible cinematography, and whether or not the "cut-to-grilled-meat" editing technique was done on purpose. Listen to the episode for yourself and let us know which you enjoyed more, the book or the movie. We want to find more fine listeners like yourself, but we can't do it without your help. All you have to do is listen, rate, & review! Find us elsewhere on the internet for more content --> Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode, the guys discuss "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," the first episode of our "2021 Oscar Bait" season. The play was written by August Wilson and debuted at the Cort Theatre on Broadway in 1984. The film was directed by George C. Wolfe, written for the screen by Ruben Santiago-Hudson, and stars Viola Davis and Chadwick Boseman. The conversation in this episode ranges from the racial and religious undertones of the story, the benefits of adapting a play, and whether or not it's okay to take action after your shoes get stepped on twice. Listen to the episode for yourself and let us know which you enjoyed more, the book or the movie. We want to find more fine listeners like yourself, but we can't do it without your help. All you have to do is listen, rate, & review! Find us elsewhere on the internet for more content --> Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode, the guys introduce the newest season of the podcast: 2021 Oscar Bait. What does that mean? Well, this season we'll be reading and discussing the (likely?) Best Adapted Screenplay nominees for 2021. The adaptations include 'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom', 'Nomadland', 'One Night in Miami', 'News of the World', and 'The Father'. The conversation ranges from why we decided to take on this season, what excites us most about the upcoming adaptations, and whether or not Erik has an unhealthy relationship with 'Entourage'. Listen to the episode for yourself and let us know which you enjoyed more, the book or the movie. We want to find more fine listeners like yourself, but we can't do it without your help. All you have to do is listen, rate, & review! Find us elsewhere on the internet for more content --> Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode, the guys discuss the 1998 novel 'Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets' and its feature film adaptation released in 2002. The novel was written by J.K. Rowling and was adapted for the screen by Steve Kloves, directed by Chris Columbus, and stars Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Kenneth Branaugh, John Cleese, Richard Harris, Jason Isaacs, Alan Rickman, and Maggie Smith. The conversation ranges from the changes made in the film, where the book and film stand in comparison with the rest of the series, and why there aren't more boosters for Quidditch athletics. Listen to the episode for yourself and let us know which you enjoyed more, the book or the movie. We want to find more fine listeners like yourself, but we can't do it without your help. All you have to do is listen, rate, & review! Find us elsewhere on the internet for more content --> Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
One last conversation before we bid adieu to 2020, a year I think we all would like to forget. But nonetheless, we discuss our Top 3's. Our favorite movies, books, and Lit to Lens episodes of the year. Cheers to 2020, may 2021 be infinitely better. Happy New Year! Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode, the guys in discuss the 1998 novel, 'The Orchid Thief', and its aptly named feature film adaptation, 'Adaptation', released in 2002. The novel 'The Orchid Thief', written by Susan Orlean, was adapted for the screen by Charlie (and Donald) Kaufman, directed by Spike Jonze, and stars Nicolas Cage, Meryl Streep, and Chris Cooper with cameos from John Malkovich, Maggie Gyllenhaal, John Cusack, Curtis Hanson, and David O. Russell. The conversation covers from the big changes made in the film including Charlie Kaufman's voice-over, the addition of Donald Kaufman, Susan Orlean's extended character arc, and whether the word "meta" can be stated too many times in one episode. Listen to the episode for yourself and let us know which you enjoyed more, the book or the movie. Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode, Mr. Charlie joins the guys in discussing the 2009 novel, 'Inherent Vice' and its feature film adaptation of the same name in 2014. The novel, written by Thomas Pynchon, was adapted for the screen by Paul Thomas Anderson (Writer/Director) and stars Joaquin Phoenix, Katherine Waterston, Josh Brolin, Reese Witherspoon, Owen Wilson, Benicio del Toro, and Martin Short. The conversation in this episode ranges from the changes made in the film including the addition of Sortilège's narration, the importance of the mystery propelling the narrative, casting choices, and whether you should smoke Red Apple cigarettes. Listen to the episode for yourself and let us know which you enjoyed more, the book or the movie. Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode, the guys discuss the 2004 novel, "Cloud Atlas", which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and eventually adapted into a feature film of the same name in 2012. The novel, written by David Mitchell, was written for the screen by The Wachowskis and Tom Twyker, directed by The Wachowskis and Tom Twyker, and stars Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent, Hugo Weaving, Jim Sturgess, Susan Sarandon, and Hugh Grant. The conversation in this episode ranges from the changes made in the film including the stark difference in the narrative structure, the over-inclusion of love, themes of cannibalism, and if Jim Sturgess breathes too much. Listen to the episode for yourself and let us know which you enjoyed more, the book or the movie. Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode, a longstanding disagreement gets resolved. Mr. Erik and Mr. Charles stand at opposite ends of the 83rd Academy Awards Best Picture debate. On one side is The Social Network, backed by Mr. Erik, while on the other side is film that ultimately took home the ultimate prize, The King's Speech, backed by Mr. Charles. The two discuss the significant impact each film has had on their lives, their worthiness the Best Picture recognition, why each film was so good, and, finally, ask the important question: Do these awards really even matter? Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode the guys discuss the 2011 novel, "The Devil All the Time", which was adapted into a film of the same name for Netflix in September 2020. The novel, written by Donald Ray Pollock, was written for the screen by Antonio and Paulo Campos, directed by Antonio Campos, and stars Tom Holland, Robert Pattinson, Jason Clarke, Sebastian Stan, Riley Keough, Bill Skarsgard, Haley Bennett, and Mia Wasikowska. The conversation in this episode ranges from the changes made in the film including the addition and subtraction of certain character plots, the gruesome nature of the story, and the potential that the movie unfortunately didn't live up to. Listen to the episode for yourself and let us know which you enjoyed more, the book or the movie. Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode the guys discuss the 2009 novel, "The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook, a Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal", which was adapted the following year into the highly-celebrated film, "The Social Network". The novel, written by Ben Mezrich, was adapted for the big screen by The King Of Speeches Aaron Sorkin, and stars Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Armie Hammer, Justin Timberlake, and Rooney Mara. The conversation ranges from the changes made in the film, including narrative restructuring, Zuckerberg's motivations for creating Facebook, and whether or not Erik likes chairs with armrests. Listen to the episode for yourself and let us know which you enjoyed more, the book or the movie. Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode the guys discuss the Netflix adaptation of the 2014 novel "Bird Box". Written by Josh Malerman, the novel was adapted for the small screen in 2018, and stars Sandra Bullock, John Malkovich, Trevante Rhodes, and Sarah Paulson. The conversation ranges from the problems writing and adapting a dual-narrative structure, confusing aspects in the film adaptation, and other goodies from the film. Listen to the episode for yourself and decide whether or not you'd like to be stuck in a box with a bunch of birds. That's what happens in this film, right? We don't really know. Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode the guys discuss the novel "To All The Boys I've Loved Before". The 2014 novel by Jenny Han spent 40 weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list for Young Adult Fiction, before it was adapted by Netflix in 2018 into a film directed by Susan Johnson and starring Lana Candor and Noah Centineo. Our conversation ranges from the unique circumstances that thrust the narrative forward, the change in Peter Kavinsky's likability, and common romance tropes which ring loudly throughout. Hopefully listening to this episode will prevent you from having secret letters sent out to your former crushes. Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode, the guys discuss the Haruki Murakami short story "Barn Burning", and its 2018 film adaptation, "Burning", directed by Lee Chang-dong. The conversation ranges from the ambiguous nature of Murakami brought to screen, social class divides, and whether or not Ben (played by Steven Yeun) is a serial killer. Hopefully listening to this episode will prevent you from burning down barns or greenhouses. No promises though. Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: www.littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode the guys chat with Neil Clarke, publisher and editor-in-chief of "Clarkesworld". The popular (and three-time Hugo-award winning) monthly science fiction and fantasy magazine has hosted stories from the likes of N.K. Jemisin, Ken Liu, and Jeff VanderMeer, among many other great writers. It's also become a showcase for some great artists, as well. The conversation ranges from the seeds that sprouted Clarkesworld, the struggles with gaining a foothold in the literary community, and the efforts being taken to include science fiction stories from all over the world. Of course, we ask Neil to give us his favorite (and least favorite) sci-fi film adaptations. Give it a listen! If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: @littolens Instagram: @littolens Blog: littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode the guys chat with Trevor Quachri, editor of "Analog" the perennial classic science fiction (and fact) magazine which has published stories from the likes of Frank Herbert, Joe Haldeman, Orson Scott Card, among many others. The conversation ranges from the magazine's beginnings as "Astounding," science fiction's expanded role today, the genre's diversity issues, and some of Trevor's favorite adaptations. If you have time, please rate and review! We want to find more listeners like you! Twitter: twitter.com/littolens Instagram: instagram.com/littolens Blog: littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In this episode, the guys discuss the classic science fiction novel and its less-classic film adaptation, released in 2005. We talk narration/voice over, the lack of central narrative, gooey love triangle's, and Zooey Deschanel's online shopping habits. Hopefully listening to this episode won't make you as depressed as our friend Marvin here. No promises though. If you like what you hear, please rate and review us! It helps us find new listeners. Twitter: twitter.com/littolens Instagram: instagram.com/littolens Blog: littolensblog.wordpress.com Email: littolens@gmail.com
In the second episode of our fifth season (all classic sci-fi if you haven't figured that out already) we discuss Solaris. The gist: it's the story of a planet that fucks with your mind. The novel, written by Stanislaw Lem, has been adapted thrice (!) but we focus our conversation on the 1972 Russian film, directed by Andrei Tarkovsky, and the 2002 film, directed by Steven Soderbergh and starring George Clooney. There's a lot to unpack here but don't worry, we brought our box cutters. Come for a conversation about the limits of human knowledge; stay for a discussion of Clooney's booty. Take a listen.
The Pod is back, baby. In this episode Erik and Will kick-off Season 5 (Classic Sci-Fi) by discussing the recent film adaptation of the famed H.G. Wells novel, 'The Invisible Man'. Hope you tune in.
Erik and Will have Christa Avampato back on to discuss the publication of her first novel, 'Emerson Page and Where the Light Enters'. Christa talks with the guys about the difficulties of the publication process, the importance of having the rights to her own work, and what's next for Emerson Page.
Erik and Will discuss the film ‘It' and its eponymous source material by Stephen King. Erik embarrassingly stumps Will in this week's quiz question. Will gets something off his chest, and Erik delves deep into the crazy world of Stephen King's novel and compares it against the relatively well-received film adaptation. Listen and enjoy.
Erik and Will have their roommate Corey on to discuss the film ‘The Dark Tower’ and part of it’s source material ‘The Gunslinger’. They discuss their frustrations with how the film played out, how much of the seven (eight?) novels was fit into the 95-minute film, and if it’s possible to make a good adaptation of the Stephen King series. He who does not listen to this podcast has forgotten the face of his father. Listen and enjoy.
Will and Erik drop into Fantom Comics in Washington, D.C. to talk to Jake, an avid comic book reader and cinephile. Erik and Will ask Jake about how he got into reading comics, what some of his favorites are, and how comic book film adaptations can often fall short.
Erik and Will discuss the film ‘V for Vendetta’ and it’s eponymous graphic novel source material. They talk about the differences between the film and the graphic novel, the morality of V, and the story’s themes of fascism, anarchy, chaos, and rebuilding. Will quizzes Erik on director James McTeigue’s other work. Listen and enjoy.
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Podcast Details

Created by
Lit to Lens
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Aug 31st, 2016
Latest Episode
Feb 25th, 2021
Release Period
Weekly
Episodes
39
Avg. Episode Length
About 1 hour
Explicit
Yes
Language
English

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