Longshot: Return Man

A weekly True Crime, Sports and Society podcast
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Hey listeners, today we're excited to introduce you to a brand new true crime show we think you'll love. It's called Camp Hell: Anneewakee, and it tells the story of The Anneewakee Treatment Center for Emotionally Disturbed Youth. This facility operated in Douglasville, Georgia for over 25 years and, purportedly, it was a place that parents could send their troubled kids for help. But in reality, it was a breeding ground for abuse. This is the story of Anneewakee, as never told before. If you liked this trailer, search for "Camp Hell: Anneewakee" in your podcasting app of choice and subscribe/follow, so you never miss an episode! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
An exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at basketball phenoms Anthony Edwards and Tyrese Maxey as they go from elite NCAA prospects to the 2020 NBA Draft. We go inside the life-changing journey of two top NBA draftees, and step into the closely-guarded world of their agents - Klutch Sports Founder and CEO Rich Paul and Klutch's Head of Basketball Omar Wilkes. Narrated by Keegan-Michael Key. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Seth Stoughton, whom listeners heard in the podcast, was a police officer before becoming a lawyer. Today, he teaches at the University of South Carolina School of Law, and is an expert in the evolution of policing tactics throughout American history. In this extended interview, Stoughton talks about lessons today's officers can learn from a case like Jim Duncan's, and the vital role of trust in the police-community relationship. To continue supporting work like this, visit heraldonline.com/podcasts and consider a digital subscription. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Paula Johnson, whom listeners heard in the podcast, is a professor at the Syracuse University College of Law, and co-director of the Cold Case Justice Initiative (CCJI). Her team at CCJI could soon begin investigating Jim Duncan's death from a legal perspective. In this extended interview, Johnson talks about how her team of student-volunteers approaches Civil Rights-era investigations, what could come next in Jim's case, and that elusive concept of closure. To continue supporting work like this, visit heraldonline.com/podcasts and consider a digital subscription. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
For some, including some of Jim Duncan's friends, the past is better left in the past. But for others, there will never be closure with so many open questions; and the chance to find answers is worth the pain of asking one last time. Late in our reporting, we learned that a legal team in New York could begin an independent investigation of this case, in the search for even more answers. To continue supporting work like this, visit heraldonline.com/podcasts and consider a digital subscription. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
In the weeks following Jim Duncan's death, conspiracy theories proliferated throughout the Black community in Lancaster. Was his death really about drugs? A woman? His skin color? Many other proposed versions of events seemed equally as implausible as the official narrative—but one scandalous theory came up time and time again, and it was one we could investigate. New episodes coming each Tuesday, through March 16. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Following Jim Duncan's death, the Lancaster County coroner called an inquest to determine what happened inside the police station. Seven witnesses were called to testify under oath; all worked at, or with, the Lancaster police department. After a short deliberation, the small jury concluded that Duncan died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. But the one Black member of the inquest panel didn't believe what became the official account, and doesn't to this day. New episodes coming each Tuesday, through March 16. To continue supporting work like this, visit heraldonline.com/podcasts and consider a digital subscription. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
According to officials, Jim Duncan walked into the Lancaster Police Station on Oct. 20, 1972, and crossed the lobby in just a few steps. Without saying a word, authorities allege, he ripped the revolver from the holster on an unsuspecting officer's hip, stepped back, and shot himself in the head. But what sort of investigation was done after the fact? What sort of investigation could have been done — and should have been done? New episodes coming each Tuesday, through March 16. To continue supporting work like this, visit heraldonline.com/podcasts and consider a digital subscription. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
After a series of injuries and bizarre behavior, Jim Duncan's last chance to catch on with a new NFL team fell short. By the fall of 1972, he was back in Lancaster; his career was over, his marriage wasn't much better off, and he was running out of money. On the morning of Oct. 20, 1972, Duncan left his family's house and drove downtown. It was the last time his loved ones saw him alive. New episodes coming each Tuesday, through March 16. To continue supporting work like this, visit heraldonline.com/podcasts and consider a digital subscription. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Following his Super Bowl win, Jim Duncan fell in love with a woman he met in South Carolina. But financial obligations soon sapped his joy for the game, and those who knew Jim say his personality began changing in unsettling ways. They speculate that for a rising star playing arguably the most dangerous position on the football field, head injuries might have begun to take their toll on Jim. New episodes coming each Tuesday, through March 16. To continue supporting work like this, visit heraldonline.com/podcasts and consider a digital subscription. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Jim Duncan's rare athleticism made him a star on the Maryland State College football team, where he played offense, defense and special teams. In 1968, he was a fourth-round draft pick by the Baltimore Colts, and soon became the leading kickoff return man in the NFL, enjoying a level of celebrity and status that friends and family back in Lancaster could hardly imagine. New episodes coming each Tuesday, through March 16. To continue supporting work like this, visit heraldonline.com/podcasts and consider a digital subscription. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Jim Duncan was one of eight children, growing up in a shotgun house on the poorest side of a small South Carolina milltown. There in Lancaster, the public facilities were segregated—but one of the few spots Blacks and whites both called home was the lone football field in town, shared by the Black and white high schools. There, Duncan began carving a path out of poverty for himself, and his family. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
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Podcast Details

Created by
iHeartRadio
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Jan 6th, 2021
Latest Episode
Apr 29th, 2021
Release Period
Weekly
Episodes
13
Avg. Episode Length
27 minutes
Explicit
Yes
Order
Serial
Language
English

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