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MuscleCarOfTheWeek

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An Automotive, Games and Hobbies podcast featuring Kevin Oeste
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2000 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra R Muscle Car Of The Week Episode 319
It’s loaded with hot performance parts, but it’s a factory built Mustang Racer! The 2000 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra R is not just regular Mustang with a wing and a set of wheels. Oh no, buddy. The Cobra R was completely engineered with hand picked parts to be a great performer on the street or track. While the stock Mustang GT was powered by a 4.6 liter V8 and remained true to the same basic formula since it’s introduction, the 2000 SVT Cobra R represented the closest factory-built racer ever. It used a special 5.4 liter V8 engine, a 6-speed manual transmission, and a parts catalog full of goodies to go fast, turn hard, and stop like a track car should. It didn’t look like your typical Mustang under the hood. Air is sucked in through the hi-ram intake, compressed in the 5.4 liter engine by forged pistons, Carillo rods, and a forged crank. High-flow 32 valve heads and shorty headers send the smoke down the pipes, leaving 385 HP in its wake. That 385 HP peaked at 5700 RPM, with it’s 385 lbs. ft torque rating coming in at 4250 RPM. Cylinder heads were Lincoln Navigator units, and the engine required a revised domed hood for clearance. A Tremec T-56 6-speed manual is the only transmission offering in the R, and the 3.55:1 rear gear spins the independent rear suspension… a first in a Mustang. These cars were good for 0-60 times in the mid 4-second range, with the quarter mile flags waving in just 12.9 seconds with 110 MPH trap speeds. Cobra R drivers didn’t need or want luxury items weighing down their ride, so the Cobra R is fitted with necessities only. You won’t find a high-powered stereo, air conditioning, or other fancy stuff inside; just the needed instrumentation and controls to rock the track. The dash features a 180 MPH speedo and 8000 rpm tach, but interestingly, non-numbered gauges for temp, oil pressure, fuel, and volts. I guess Ford figured you’d add a set of numbered gauges if you were serious about racing. Recaro seats keep the driver’s keester in place when wheeling the R around the track, but the rear seat was ditched to save weight. The 2000 Cobra R sits low thanks to dropped Eibach springs and twist-resistant oversize sway bars, and Bilstein shocks and struts. Adding to the outstanding handling is a 2000 Cobra R exclusive independent rear suspension… something standard Mustangs didn’t get until 2015. Cobra R’s rolled on 18x9.5” aluminum wheels wrapped in BF Goodrich g-ForceKD 265/40ZR-18 tires that were specially designed for the car. Retina-detaching brakes were 13” vented rotors with 4-piston Brembo calipers up front, with 11.65” rear rotors out back. Braking performance is a great match to the acceleration capabilities of the R. The rear spoiler is the obvious indicator of a Cobra R, but these cars have several other body mods as well. We mentioned the Power Dome hood, and the lower front fascia is also unique to the Cobra R. Side exhaust tips peek out of the Ford only built 300 2000 Cobra R’s, and this is one of the newest remaining, with less than 2000 miles on the odometer. The wing might look a little extreme, but it has a purpose on this 170 MPH capable Cobra R. Is this Cobra your speed? Share your thoughts on this one or any of the cars here in The Brother’s Collection, we’re happy to hear ‘em. Thanks for watching, and we’ll see you next time! #CobraR #MustangCobraR #musclecaroftheweek 2000 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra R Muscle Car Of The Week Episode 319 SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
1967 Ford Galaxie 7-Litre R Code 427 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 317
By 1967, the baby boomers were starting to have families of their own, and big, full-size cars like Ford Galaxies were flying off the showroom floors by the hundreds of thousands. Performance car enthusiasts now had a variety of smaller, powerful pony cars to choose from, like the Ford Mustang and Chevrolet Camaro. And while Ford offered high-performance versions of it’s full-size family cars for years, the sales numbers of the big-inch big cars was declining. Our ‘67 Galaxie 500 XL is fitted with the 7-Litre Sports Package and hides a legendary V8 under the hood, and is one of only a handful and a half ever built. The 7-Litre Sport Package started with the 345 HP 428 cubic inch V8 as the cornerstone, available with an automatic or a 4-speed manual transmission. However, this just one of 8 made with the R-code 427, a 425 HP specially built powerplant that sucked air and gas through 2 4-barrel carburetors, smashed the mixture in high compression heads, and blew out the smoke through header-like cast iron manifolds. It wringed out nearly 500 ft. lbs of torque and sent it through the toploader 4-speed down to the 3.50 gear equipped rear axle, ready to launch this XL sized XL off the line with authority. The plush interior of this 7 Litre is like a high-speed rumpus room, all jazzed up with the XL series bucket seats and wood grain steering wheel, and more red landscape than the surface of mars. Cool vertical wood grain inserts run up and down the door panels, and the long center console is capped with a spacy 4-place indicator light set. There are surprisingly few gauges, but the curious speed redline still graces the speedometer.. it was a Ford thing of the mid ‘60s. It’s a big, roomy, comfortable place to mash the gas and row the gears. The long, sleek lines of this swingin’ ‘60s luxo cruiser are highlighted by the fastback rear design, and how everything else leans forward, suggesting speed and power. 7-Litres rolled on wider steel wheels with mag-style caps snapped in place, and front disc brakes have the unenviable task of stopping the big ride. Redline tires accent the bright red paint, their stripe echoed in the 7-Litre’s thin white pinstripe that runs the whole length of the car. There are a few exterior badges, but nothing blatantly obvious like a billboard stripe to warn the others of a 427 lurking in their midst. Driving this car is an experience like few others, as the suspension is soft, and you can really feel the car’s size as you wheel it through the turns. Lifting the clutch and stomping the gas creates a fore-aft rocking as the super 7 squats under the torque, and you better have a clear road head, because this car is going to own it. #7Litre #427Galaxie #musclecaroftheweek 1967 Ford Galaxie 7-Litre R Code 427 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 317 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
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1968 was the second year for the Pontiac Firebird, a car originally marketed to compete in the still fairly-new Pony car segment started by the insanely popular Ford Mustang.   All the American OEs jumped on the bandwagon, and Pontiac’s Firebird was intended to be a bit more upscale to compete with other luxury pony car entries like the Mercury Cougar.   The lesson here is that fast cars can look unassuming and still be potent performers! #PontiacFirebird #Firebird #MuscleCaroftheWeek SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.v8tvshow.com - 314.783.8325 - http://www.v8speedshop.com FACEBOOK PAGE: https://www.facebook.com/V8TVshow/ SHOP FACEBOOK PAGE: https://www.facebook.com/V8SpeedShop/ http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com -
1968 Chevrolet El Camino 396 SS Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 316
Some people consider the Chevrolet El Camino to be somewhat of a novelty item, especially in the SS versions. Originally built as a competitor to Ford’s original “mini truck” - the Ranchero - the ElCamino served dutifully to those who needed a helping hand carrying small payloads but didn’t need , or want, a pickup regular pickup truck. But this one is the real deal when it comes to performance, style, and yes… practicality! Chevrolet boasted about the ElCamino having stamina and style.. the perfect choice for “right now” people who need a versatile vehicle for work, recreation, and around-town errands.” With a 1500 lb payload and over 6 feet of bed length with the tailgate down, an ElCamino is a hard worker. Base models came with a 230 HP 6 cylinder engine, but that’s not why we’re here. This is Muscle Car Of The Week for cryin’ out loud. To attract more buyers, Chevrolet adapted the SS trim and performance package from the Chevelle to the ElCamino, which now gave buyers a way to drive a high-powered muscle car nearly guilt free! After all, it was a work vehicle, why not add a big block, 4-speed, and performance suspension? Who says you shouldn't make your work environment a bit more fun? S1: Doesn’t need a trailer.. This particular ‘68 Elky SS is rocking the highest output 396 available, the RPO code L78 375 HP 396 backed by a Muncie 4-speed transmission. L78 specs read more like a race engine than a work truck plant, with and 11.5:1 compression ratio and a solid lifter cam. The cylinder heads featured oversized valves and large rectangular ports for heavy breathing, and a forged crank secured by 4-bolt main caps kept the special connecting rods swinging at high rpm. Power was rated at 375hp at 5600 rpm and 415 lb-ft of torque at 3600 rpm. A Muncie M22 4-speed and 12-bolt rear end equipped with 3.55:1 gears spin the wheels. You’ll have no excuse to be late to the jobsite with one of these. The L78 package also included the F41 heavy-duty suspension, consisting of higher-rate coil springs and shocks matched to them, a larger front sway bar, and braced and boxed rear control arms to keep the 4-link rear suspension system for twisting into a ribbon under hard launches. A rear sway bar was also part of the package, as were 14” rally wheels and F70-14” tires. The ElCamino SS has a great look, like it’s lazier, no-job-having brother, the Chevelle SS. This one is finished in a sweet Seafrost Green with a black lower accent and black vinyl top. We really dig the color contrast with the black, green, silver Rally wheels, and redline tires… it’s just enough of each color to play along without clashing. The SS badges are present, along with the little 396 box on the marker light. Subtle, for sure, but they’re there. The tailgate frames a satin-black stripe, and Chevy fans know that black band means big-block lurks under the hood. It’s a warning to those looking to pick on our little pickup on it’s way home from work. Inside, you’d never know you weren't in a Chevelle SS unless you looked in the rear view mirror. It’s got all the goodies… strato bucket seats, wood wheel, full console, Hurst-shifted 4-speed, and the full gauge panel in the dash. We love the drum-style tachometer. Am tunes and a heater keep you company on the way to the jobsite… or drag strip! The exact production number of L78 ‘68 ElCaminos isn’t known, but a figure of 393 has been estimated. We’re happy to see one in The Brothers Collection, and trust that it’s working days are over, but it’s definitely not retired. 1968 Chevrolet ElCamino 396 SS Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 316 V8TV #musclecaroftheweek #ElCamino #SS396 http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com - FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MuscleCarOfTheWeek/
1968 Chevrolet El Camino 396 SS Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 316
Some people consider the Chevrolet El Camino to be somewhat of a novelty item, especially in the SS versions. Originally built as a competitor to Ford’s original “mini truck” - the Ranchero - the ElCamino served dutifully to those who needed a helping hand carrying small payloads but didn’t need , or want, a pickup regular pickup truck. But this one is the real deal when it comes to performance, style, and yes… practicality! Chevrolet boasted about the ElCamino having stamina and style.. the perfect choice for “right now” people who need a versatile vehicle for work, recreation, and around-town errands.” With a 1500 lb payload and over 6 feet of bed length with the tailgate down, an ElCamino is a hard worker. Base models came with a 230 HP 6 cylinder engine, but that’s not why we’re here. This is Muscle Car Of The Week for cryin’ out loud. To attract more buyers, Chevrolet adapted the SS trim and performance package from the Chevelle to the ElCamino, which now gave buyers a way to drive a high-powered muscle car nearly guilt free! After all, it was a work vehicle, why not add a big block, 4-speed, and performance suspension? Who says you shouldn't make your work environment a bit more fun? S1: Doesn’t need a trailer.. This particular ‘68 Elky SS is rocking the highest output 396 available, the RPO code L78 375 HP 396 backed by a Muncie 4-speed transmission. L78 specs read more like a race engine than a work truck plant, with and 11.5:1 compression ratio and a solid lifter cam. The cylinder heads featured oversized valves and large rectangular ports for heavy breathing, and a forged crank secured by 4-bolt main caps kept the special connecting rods swinging at high rpm. Power was rated at 375hp at 5600 rpm and 415 lb-ft of torque at 3600 rpm. A Muncie M22 4-speed and 12-bolt rear end equipped with 3.55:1 gears spin the wheels. You’ll have no excuse to be late to the jobsite with one of these. The L78 package also included the F41 heavy-duty suspension, consisting of higher-rate coil springs and shocks matched to them, a larger front sway bar, and braced and boxed rear control arms to keep the 4-link rear suspension system for twisting into a ribbon under hard launches. A rear sway bar was also part of the package, as were 14” rally wheels and F70-14” tires. The ElCamino SS has a great look, like it’s lazier, no-job-having brother, the Chevelle SS. This one is finished in a sweet Seafrost Green with a black lower accent and black vinyl top. We really dig the color contrast with the black, green, silver Rally wheels, and redline tires… it’s just enough of each color to play along without clashing. The SS badges are present, along with the little 396 box on the marker light. Subtle, for sure, but they’re there. The tailgate frames a satin-black stripe, and Chevy fans know that black band means big-block lurks under the hood. It’s a warning to those looking to pick on our little pickup on it’s way home from work. Inside, you’d never know you weren't in a Chevelle SS unless you looked in the rear view mirror. It’s got all the goodies… strato bucket seats, wood wheel, full console, Hurst-shifted 4-speed, and the full gauge panel in the dash. We love the drum-style tachometer. Am tunes and a heater keep you company on the way to the jobsite… or drag strip! The exact production number of L78 ‘68 ElCaminos isn’t known, but a figure of 393 has been estimated. We’re happy to see one in The Brothers Collection, and trust that it’s working days are over, but it’s definitely not retired. 1968 Chevrolet ElCamino 396 SS Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 316 V8TV #musclecaroftheweek #ElCamino #SS396 http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com - FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MuscleCarOfTheWeek/
1971 Dodge Super Bee 426 Hemi Sunroof Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 314
1971 saw a completely new Dodge Charger. Out was the long, sharp, boxy Charger and “in” was the new curvier model for ‘71. The new design featured a more pronounced long nose / short deck look, and although it was about 2 inches shorter than the 68-70 model, it was also wider than it’s predecessor. The design remains controversial, with the interestingly up-swept pillarless side window design and fastback-ish rear roofline. A new bumper design split the nose in half, and our Charger Super Bee features a clean look with hidden headlights. You could order all kinds of engines in your 1971 Charger, but our featured Super Bee is fitted with the one everyone talks about… the 425 HP 426 Hemi V8, and it’s coupled to a 4-speed manual transmission. And while a Hemi Orange ‘71 Super Bee with a 426 and a stick might be tops on any muscle car wish list, it’s the top of this one that makes it even more special. If you’ve never seen a factory installed power sunroof like this one, you’re not alone. Chrysler didn’t sell very many of the nearly $500 options, which mandated the full vinyl top as well. When you add in the code E74 426 Hemi engine at over $880.00, and you were looking at an expensive Super Bee back in ‘71 even before you start adding the rest of the options. Which do you think had lower production, the Hemi or the Sun Roof? We’ll answer that one later. But if you DID spring for all these goodies, you got one heck of a ride, man. Ours features a sprawling white bench seat interior, complete with power windows, a 150 MPH speedo, 8000 RPM tach, and a pistol grip shifter for workin’ the 4-speed gearbox. Looking out over the long hood is a trip from any angle, as the Ramcharger scoop comes to life letting the 2 Carter AFB 4-barrels fill the Hemi with air. We’re envisioning a clear day, turning up the Music Master AM radio, hitting the power overhead switch to let the sun shine in, and dumping the clutch to let the 490 ft. lbs. of torque launch us straight into the 5th dimension. These cars drive really nicely when in this kind of condition. Power steering and brakes ease the driver effort, and the heavy duty clutch is quite tolerable, even in traffic. The famous Chrysler torsion bar front suspension is taught but comfortable, with a sway bar to keep things on the level in the turns, and the 15 inch rally wheels and Goodyear Polyglas GTs hold the road. A Dana 60 rear axle can stand up to the torque as the leaf springs try to hold it in place. These cars have some of the coolest exhaust tips ever… many call them Machine Gun tips, but the red and chrome ends are officially called “Exhaust Bright Tips”. We call them awesome. This is a love it or hate it design, and we’re leaning towards the love it, especially drenched in Hemi Orange with the white vinyl top and blacked-out hood to break it all up. The thin black stripe looks like the car just crossed the finish line with a black ribbon wrapped around the base of the windshield. Dual painted racing mirrors look cool, too. All tolled, there were 5,054 1971 Super Bees built. 22 came equipped with the 426 Hemi engine, and only 9 of those were 4-speed manual cars. Coincidentally, there were also 9 known power sunroof 1971 Super Bees built with any of the available engines. But how many Hemi 4-speed cars had sunroofs? I’m not sure, but this one in the Brothers Collection is the Super Bee’s Knees, for sure. #SunroofMopar #HemiSuperBee #musclecaroftheweek 1971 Dodge Super Bee 426 Hemi Sunroof Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 314 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
1971 Dodge Super Bee 426 Hemi Sunroof Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 314
1971 saw a completely new Dodge Charger. Out was the long, sharp, boxy Charger and “in” was the new curvier model for ‘71. The new design featured a more pronounced long nose / short deck look, and although it was about 2 inches shorter than the 68-70 model, it was also wider than it’s predecessor. The design remains controversial, with the interestingly up-swept pillarless side window design and fastback-ish rear roofline. A new bumper design split the nose in half, and our Charger Super Bee features a clean look with hidden headlights. You could order all kinds of engines in your 1971 Charger, but our featured Super Bee is fitted with the one everyone talks about… the 425 HP 426 Hemi V8, and it’s coupled to a 4-speed manual transmission. And while a Hemi Orange ‘71 Super Bee with a 426 and a stick might be tops on any muscle car wish list, it’s the top of this one that makes it even more special. If you’ve never seen a factory installed power sunroof like this one, you’re not alone. Chrysler didn’t sell very many of the nearly $500 options, which mandated the full vinyl top as well. When you add in the code E74 426 Hemi engine at over $880.00, and you were looking at an expensive Super Bee back in ‘71 even before you start adding the rest of the options. Which do you think had lower production, the Hemi or the Sun Roof? We’ll answer that one later. But if you DID spring for all these goodies, you got one heck of a ride, man. Ours features a sprawling white bench seat interior, complete with power windows, a 150 MPH speedo, 8000 RPM tach, and a pistol grip shifter for workin’ the 4-speed gearbox. Looking out over the long hood is a trip from any angle, as the Ramcharger scoop comes to life letting the 2 Carter AFB 4-barrels fill the Hemi with air. We’re envisioning a clear day, turning up the Music Master AM radio, hitting the power overhead switch to let the sun shine in, and dumping the clutch to let the 490 ft. lbs. of torque launch us straight into the 5th dimension. These cars drive really nicely when in this kind of condition. Power steering and brakes ease the driver effort, and the heavy duty clutch is quite tolerable, even in traffic. The famous Chrysler torsion bar front suspension is taught but comfortable, with a sway bar to keep things on the level in the turns, and the 15 inch rally wheels and Goodyear Polyglas GTs hold the road. A Dana 60 rear axle can stand up to the torque as the leaf springs try to hold it in place. These cars have some of the coolest exhaust tips ever… many call them Machine Gun tips, but the red and chrome ends are officially called “Exhaust Bright Tips”. We call them awesome. This is a love it or hate it design, and we’re leaning towards the love it, especially drenched in Hemi Orange with the white vinyl top and blacked-out hood to break it all up. The thin black stripe looks like the car just crossed the finish line with a black ribbon wrapped around the base of the windshield. Dual painted racing mirrors look cool, too. All tolled, there were 5,054 1971 Super Bees built. 22 came equipped with the 426 Hemi engine, and only 9 of those were 4-speed manual cars. Coincidentally, there were also 9 known power sunroof 1971 Super Bees built with any of the available engines. But how many Hemi 4-speed cars had sunroofs? I’m not sure, but this one in the Brothers Collection is the Super Bee’s Knees, for sure. #SunroofMopar #HemiSuperBee #musclecaroftheweek 1971 Dodge Super Bee 426 Hemi Sunroof Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 314 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
421 Pontiac Vs. 427 Ford 4 Doors  Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 313 V8TV
It’s 1965, and the family is shopping for a new car. Dad is torn between the sharp new full size Fords, with their angular design and new suspension systems. However, he’s been a Pontiac man for years, and the entire Pontiac line had just been awarded Motor Trend’s Car of The Year! It’s a tough choice, especially when he learns that the Ford Galaxie and the Pontiac Catalina can both be had with the hottest engines of the day. You see, even though there’s a wife, kids, and practicality to consider, Dad’s a hot rodder at heart, and the thought of wheeling a high-powered 4-door sleeper is fun for Pops. Both of these two unassuming family sedans are locked and loaded with engines normally associate with racers… the a tri-carbed Pontiac 421 and a dual quad Ford 427! In Pontiac’s corner, we find a giant white 4-door Catalina hiding the 10 3/4:1 compression 421 High Output Trophy “Thunderer” V8 under the hood. The 421 H.O. was rated at 376 HP and 466 foot-pounds of twist, gulping down the gas through 3-two barrel carbs. A family car with an axe to grind, for sure. The Ford is no slouch, either… with a 427 cubic-inch 10.25:1 compression R-Code V8, a 425 HP bruiser with 480 ft. lbs. of torque on hand to launch this 4-door when the light turns green. Dual 4-barrels allow for as much air and fuel as the 427 can stomach. Both cars are backed with 4-speed manual transmissions, the Pontiac uses a Muncie box, while the Ford spins a Toploader. We dig that they are both bench-seat 4-speed cars… you know, to provide as much room as possible for the kids to fit in the front seat while street racing! The Pontiac Safe-T-Track provides torque to both rear wheels, and the Ford follows suit with a 9” rear end stuffed with a 3.50:1 gearset. Style wise, the Ford is a bit more crisp with it’s brand new design for ‘65, complete with Pyrex-covered stacked headlights and a pillarless 4-door hardtop design. It’s very conservative and contemporary, and they were selling like hotcakes. The Catalina is a bit swoopier looking, but the bright-trimmed window frames don’t let you forget this one is a 4-door sled. The white doesn’t help accentuate the shape, but it does help this car’s disguise. You’d never expect the fury that lies within. It’s interesting to note that all the performance options on this car were regular options on the full-size ‘65 Pontiac line, so anyone could order one up at their local Pontiac dealer. The Galaxie, however, is believed to be the only ‘65 4-door ever built with the R-Code 427 and 4-speed factory installed. It’s exceptionally rare for sure. We’ve featured both of these cars individually in the past, but viewers suggested a comparison video would be interesting. You can see the Galaxie in episode #51, and the Catalina in episode #251 of Muscle Car Of The Week. #427galaxie #catalina421 #musclecaroftheweek 421 Pontiac Vs. 427 Ford 4 Doors Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 313 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
421 Pontiac Vs. 427 Ford 4 Doors  Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 313 V8TV
It’s 1965, and the family is shopping for a new car. Dad is torn between the sharp new full size Fords, with their angular design and new suspension systems. However, he’s been a Pontiac man for years, and the entire Pontiac line had just been awarded Motor Trend’s Car of The Year! It’s a tough choice, especially when he learns that the Ford Galaxie and the Pontiac Catalina can both be had with the hottest engines of the day. You see, even though there’s a wife, kids, and practicality to consider, Dad’s a hot rodder at heart, and the thought of wheeling a high-powered 4-door sleeper is fun for Pops. Both of these two unassuming family sedans are locked and loaded with engines normally associate with racers… the a tri-carbed Pontiac 421 and a dual quad Ford 427! In Pontiac’s corner, we find a giant white 4-door Catalina hiding the 10 3/4:1 compression 421 High Output Trophy “Thunderer” V8 under the hood. The 421 H.O. was rated at 376 HP and 466 foot-pounds of twist, gulping down the gas through 3-two barrel carbs. A family car with an axe to grind, for sure. The Ford is no slouch, either… with a 427 cubic-inch 10.25:1 compression R-Code V8, a 425 HP bruiser with 480 ft. lbs. of torque on hand to launch this 4-door when the light turns green. Dual 4-barrels allow for as much air and fuel as the 427 can stomach. Both cars are backed with 4-speed manual transmissions, the Pontiac uses a Muncie box, while the Ford spins a Toploader. We dig that they are both bench-seat 4-speed cars… you know, to provide as much room as possible for the kids to fit in the front seat while street racing! The Pontiac Safe-T-Track provides torque to both rear wheels, and the Ford follows suit with a 9” rear end stuffed with a 3.50:1 gearset. Style wise, the Ford is a bit more crisp with it’s brand new design for ‘65, complete with Pyrex-covered stacked headlights and a pillarless 4-door hardtop design. It’s very conservative and contemporary, and they were selling like hotcakes. The Catalina is a bit swoopier looking, but the bright-trimmed window frames don’t let you forget this one is a 4-door sled. The white doesn’t help accentuate the shape, but it does help this car’s disguise. You’d never expect the fury that lies within. It’s interesting to note that all the performance options on this car were regular options on the full-size ‘65 Pontiac line, so anyone could order one up at their local Pontiac dealer. The Galaxie, however, is believed to be the only ‘65 4-door ever built with the R-Code 427 and 4-speed factory installed. It’s exceptionally rare for sure. We’ve featured both of these cars individually in the past, but viewers suggested a comparison video would be interesting. You can see the Galaxie in episode #51, and the Catalina in episode #251 of Muscle Car Of The Week. #427galaxie #catalina421 #musclecaroftheweek 421 Pontiac Vs. 427 Ford 4 Doors Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 313 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
1955 Chevrolet Corvette Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 312
Modern Corvettes are known as sleek, powerful machines with an equal dose of speed and style. But back in the early days of production, the Corvette was an oddity… a neat looking car built with new composite construction technology, but seriously underpowered by a straight-six engine, and a wobbly suspension system that was far from confidence inspiring. But thankfully, all that would change. For the first two years of production, the Chevrolet Corvette was much more of a looker than a go-er. But for 1955, the Corvette’s engine bay was upgraded with the all new Chevrolet 265 cube V8, giving the ‘Vette some much needed power to chase down Ford’s new Thunderbirds. The 265 overhead valve V8 engine was the first version of one of the most popular V8 engines ever produced. The 3.8750” bore and 3” stroke made for a favorable bore to stroke ratio, and the little “Turbo Fire” V8 easily outpaced the previous “Blue Flame” 6-cylinder. The 2 barrel version developed 160 HP, but Corvettes received the Rochester 4-barrel, making 195 HP. Finally, the Corvette had some guts under the hood, and was no longer just a pretty poseur. A subtle 1955-only tattle tale was the big “V” in the Corvette script… if you saw that, you were probably on your way to seeing tail lights, as you were lined up against a powerful new V8 roadster! The new V8 shaved 2.4 seconds off the six cylinder car’s 0-60 time, and set the stage for a high-performance future. Only 700 were sold, but Corvette was changing from a good looking but quirky novelty to a true American sports car. But the 265 had some issues… stress cracks in pistons became a thing, and the engine was designed without and oil filter, so one had to be added on if you didn’t want to change your oil every week. But those shortcomings were resolved in the 1956 version. And although the big news was the Turbo Fire V8, the 1955 Corvette was the first year for the new close-ratio 3-speed manual transmission, with the 2-speed Powerglide being optional. While the ‘55 Corvette finally got some much-needed power and innovation, suspension Improvements to the Corvette were coming along a bit slower. The ‘55 still rode on the basic design as the ‘54 and ‘53 cars, and it’s handling was less than stellar. A sneek peek into the future saw the involvement of racer and engineer Zora Arkus Duntov getting his mits on the chassis, with the resulting improvements giving Corvette power and road holding performance. But the ‘55 cars just weren’t quite there yet, and they pushed in the turns and tail-wagged out back when the power was on in the turns. However, most of that was forgiven thanks to the amazing styling worn by these cars. This one is apparently dipped in Gypsy Red, set off by just enough brightly chromed trim and white walled tires. The first year for tubeless tires in a Corvette, by the way. Race inspired mesh headlight guards flank the toothy grin up front, and spacy little fins lead into simple taillights tipping the quarters. Cool exhaust tips through the rear bumper were a Corvette thing, as were the wispy chrome bumpers. We dig the rear license plate greenhouse. It’s a great looking car from all angles. The interior remains simple and elegant, with gauges and the radio all neatly centered in the dash. It almost looks more like a speedboat inside, but then again, that’s kind of what a Corvette is by definition. The 6000 RPM tach was legit for the 265 V8, and the rev counter meter is a cool and unusual display. The seats appear more comfortable than they are, but this car was all about looking cool, not all-day ergonomic correctness. The giant steering wheel offsets the tiny shifter in manual cars. The 265 cube V8 grew to become the stuff of legends, and it’s offspring power many of the Chevrolet muscle cars here in The Brothers Collection. We’ve enjoyed looking back to the beginning, and hope you did as well. Thanks for joining us, and we’ll wheel out another one next time on Muscle Car Of The Week! #Corvette #1955Corvette #musclecaroftheweek 1955 Chevrolet Corvette Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 312 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
1955 Chevrolet Corvette Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 312
Modern Corvettes are known as sleek, powerful machines with an equal dose of speed and style. But back in the early days of production, the Corvette was an oddity… a neat looking car built with new composite construction technology, but seriously underpowered by a straight-six engine, and a wobbly suspension system that was far from confidence inspiring. But thankfully, all that would change. For the first two years of production, the Chevrolet Corvette was much more of a looker than a go-er. But for 1955, the Corvette’s engine bay was upgraded with the all new Chevrolet 265 cube V8, giving the ‘Vette some much needed power to chase down Ford’s new Thunderbirds. The 265 overhead valve V8 engine was the first version of one of the most popular V8 engines ever produced. The 3.8750” bore and 3” stroke made for a favorable bore to stroke ratio, and the little “Turbo Fire” V8 easily outpaced the previous “Blue Flame” 6-cylinder. The 2 barrel version developed 160 HP, but Corvettes received the Rochester 4-barrel, making 195 HP. Finally, the Corvette had some guts under the hood, and was no longer just a pretty poseur. A subtle 1955-only tattle tale was the big “V” in the Corvette script… if you saw that, you were probably on your way to seeing tail lights, as you were lined up against a powerful new V8 roadster! The new V8 shaved 2.4 seconds off the six cylinder car’s 0-60 time, and set the stage for a high-performance future. Only 700 were sold, but Corvette was changing from a good looking but quirky novelty to a true American sports car. But the 265 had some issues… stress cracks in pistons became a thing, and the engine was designed without and oil filter, so one had to be added on if you didn’t want to change your oil every week. But those shortcomings were resolved in the 1956 version. And although the big news was the Turbo Fire V8, the 1955 Corvette was the first year for the new close-ratio 3-speed manual transmission, with the 2-speed Powerglide being optional. While the ‘55 Corvette finally got some much-needed power and innovation, suspension Improvements to the Corvette were coming along a bit slower. The ‘55 still rode on the basic design as the ‘54 and ‘53 cars, and it’s handling was less than stellar. A sneek peek into the future saw the involvement of racer and engineer Zora Arkus Duntov getting his mits on the chassis, with the resulting improvements giving Corvette power and road holding performance. But the ‘55 cars just weren’t quite there yet, and they pushed in the turns and tail-wagged out back when the power was on in the turns. However, most of that was forgiven thanks to the amazing styling worn by these cars. This one is apparently dipped in Gypsy Red, set off by just enough brightly chromed trim and white walled tires. The first year for tubeless tires in a Corvette, by the way. Race inspired mesh headlight guards flank the toothy grin up front, and spacy little fins lead into simple taillights tipping the quarters. Cool exhaust tips through the rear bumper were a Corvette thing, as were the wispy chrome bumpers. We dig the rear license plate greenhouse. It’s a great looking car from all angles. The interior remains simple and elegant, with gauges and the radio all neatly centered in the dash. It almost looks more like a speedboat inside, but then again, that’s kind of what a Corvette is by definition. The 6000 RPM tach was legit for the 265 V8, and the rev counter meter is a cool and unusual display. The seats appear more comfortable than they are, but this car was all about looking cool, not all-day ergonomic correctness. The giant steering wheel offsets the tiny shifter in manual cars. The 265 cube V8 grew to become the stuff of legends, and it’s offspring power many of the Chevrolet muscle cars here in The Brothers Collection. We’ve enjoyed looking back to the beginning, and hope you did as well. Thanks for joining us, and we’ll wheel out another one next time on Muscle Car Of The Week! #Corvette #1955Corvette #musclecaroftheweek 1955 Chevrolet Corvette Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 312 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
Behind The Scenes Paint Tech Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 311
This week, we’re taking you behind the scenes at The Brothers Collection for a look at how the team checks to see if cars are wearing their original paint using a digital paint mil thickness gauge. #paint #Musclecar #original Behind The Scenes Paint Tech Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 311 SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
Behind The Scenes Paint Tech Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 311
This week, we’re taking you behind the scenes at The Brothers Collection for a look at how the team checks to see if cars are wearing their original paint using a digital paint mil thickness gauge. #paint #Musclecar #original Behind The Scenes Paint Tech Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 311 SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
1969 Pontiac Trans Am Ram Air IV Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 310
1969 was the first year for the Pontiac Firebird Trans Am model, which took the basic Firebird platform and pushed it towards the moon in both style and performance. There are lots of things to like about these cars, and this particular car has ‘em all. The most obvious difference between a base model Firebird and the racy Trans Am is the styling. Pontiac designers added all the right elements in all the right places to make this car stand out. The nose features clean, body colored headlight bezels and a narrow chrome bumper that doubles as the grille surround. Trans Am cars received their own special dual-snorkel hood with a functional ram air system to feed the 400 cube V8 all the fresh air it could handle. Functional air extractors are mounted on the fenders to help heat escape from under the hood… and these Pontiacs were capable of making some heat on the street! The rear view is crowned by a sleek 2 pedestal rear spoiler that wraps down on the ends to follow the contours of the quarter panels, a look that is far more integrated than many bolt-on spoilers of the time. In fact, all the Trans Am additions to the body appear “designed in” and not just added on, but one of the coolest features are the stripes. These cars were only available in Cameo White with two Tyrol Blue stripes that start at the nose of the car, and go up over the roof… then back down the rear deck ending in the solid blue tail panel. Now factory applied stripes were pretty unusual in 1969, especially stripes going over the roof of a car. The look is like nothing else on the road, and to me, this Firebird almost appears to have aerospace theme to the design. And because these cars were all the same in appearance… you couldn’t get a green one with silver stripes, for example.. they have great uniformity, almost like the Air Force Thunderbirds for the street. You almost expect the driver to step out in a matching flight suit, helmet in hand and aviator shades in place. You don't just own a 1969 Trans Am, you’re a member of an elite street squadron. Of course, the hairy Ram Air IV V8 and close ratio 4-speed make up the other half of this car’s awesome personality. And I have to tell you, I drove this car a bit, and it all lives up to the hype. The car has the right sound, the Hurst shifter feels great, and the suspension is smooth and tight. Trans Ams got stiffer springs and shocks, a bigger front sway bar, and this one rolls on Rally II wheels, although steelies and caps were standard. The car makes smooth power that pours on as you demand, and the Trans Am dashboard gauges keep you well informed of what’s going on under the long hood. This one has a matching blue interior with comfy bucket seats, and we dig the no-console look of the 4-speed stick on the floor. The car looks like a hero, and you feel like one when you drive it! From The Brothers Collection. #1969TransAm #Musclecar #transam 1969 Pontiac Trans Am Ram Air IV Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 310 SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
1969 Pontiac Trans Am Ram Air IV Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 310
1969 was the first year for the Pontiac Firebird Trans Am model, which took the basic Firebird platform and pushed it towards the moon in both style and performance. There are lots of things to like about these cars, and this particular car has ‘em all. The most obvious difference between a base model Firebird and the racy Trans Am is the styling. Pontiac designers added all the right elements in all the right places to make this car stand out. The nose features clean, body colored headlight bezels and a narrow chrome bumper that doubles as the grille surround. Trans Am cars received their own special dual-snorkel hood with a functional ram air system to feed the 400 cube V8 all the fresh air it could handle. Functional air extractors are mounted on the fenders to help heat escape from under the hood… and these Pontiacs were capable of making some heat on the street! The rear view is crowned by a sleek 2 pedestal rear spoiler that wraps down on the ends to follow the contours of the quarter panels, a look that is far more integrated than many bolt-on spoilers of the time. In fact, all the Trans Am additions to the body appear “designed in” and not just added on, but one of the coolest features are the stripes. These cars were only available in Cameo White with two Tyrol Blue stripes that start at the nose of the car, and go up over the roof… then back down the rear deck ending in the solid blue tail panel. Now factory applied stripes were pretty unusual in 1969, especially stripes going over the roof of a car. The look is like nothing else on the road, and to me, this Firebird almost appears to have aerospace theme to the design. And because these cars were all the same in appearance… you couldn’t get a green one with silver stripes, for example.. they have great uniformity, almost like the Air Force Thunderbirds for the street. You almost expect the driver to step out in a matching flight suit, helmet in hand and aviator shades in place. You don't just own a 1969 Trans Am, you’re a member of an elite street squadron. Of course, the hairy Ram Air IV V8 and close ratio 4-speed make up the other half of this car’s awesome personality. And I have to tell you, I drove this car a bit, and it all lives up to the hype. The car has the right sound, the Hurst shifter feels great, and the suspension is smooth and tight. Trans Ams got stiffer springs and shocks, a bigger front sway bar, and this one rolls on Rally II wheels, although steelies and caps were standard. The car makes smooth power that pours on as you demand, and the Trans Am dashboard gauges keep you well informed of what’s going on under the long hood. This one has a matching blue interior with comfy bucket seats, and we dig the no-console look of the 4-speed stick on the floor. The car looks like a hero, and you feel like one when you drive it! From The Brothers Collection. #1969TransAm #Musclecar #transam 1969 Pontiac Trans Am Ram Air IV Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 310 SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com
1963 Ford 300 427 4-Speed 4 Door Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 309
We normally don’t associate high-performance 1960s cars with having 4 doors, but we also don’t see many 1960s 4-door sedans powered by high-compression, dual-quad fed 427s with 4-speed hanging on them from the factory! Well this is just such a machine. And we have to correct ourselves already… we called this one a “Custom 300” in the intro, but in fact, Ford’s low-price entry in the full size field was just named the 300 for 1963, a name used for a single year model, even though low-price full size Fords had been around for decades. The 300 shared the chassis, suspension, drivetrains, and other basic structural elements with the flashier Galaxie and Galaxie 500, but it was far more bare-bones, without fancy trim or other luxury items. Most were straight six or small V8 powered with manuals on the column. 300s were slab-sided sleds sold in several solid skins set off by 3 selections of seat stain. Some suggest it’s short on style, but we think simple is solid when it’s served with serious steam. 300s were also used largely in fleet vehicle trim, ranging from taxicabs to police cars. Interestingly, Ford had several levels of Police Car trim offerings in ‘63, ranging from the 138 HP six-cylinder Deputy model designed for “General Purpose” police work, the Police Sentinel, with it’s small block 260 V8 making 164 HP of law enforcement power, the 352 powered Guardian, for “all around” police work, up to the 330-hp 390 powered Interceptor versions, far more capable of chasing down bad guys on their way out of Mayberry. But our 300 is even more than that, although we really don’t know if it ever served in a municipal capacity. The black and blue color scheme sure looks official. 300s could be ordered with any of the Ford V8s, including the 425 HP 427, no matter how many doors it had. We’re not exactly sure how many of these were built, but it’s not many. Inside, this 4-door 300 is as bare as they come, with giant flat bench seats, crank-up windows, minimal trim, and very few amenities. This one sports an AM radio and a heater, but perhaps the most important feature is the 4-speed shifter in front of the bench seat. Outside, the only indicator of this beasts potential is the little 427 badge on the fender, which almost seems like a gag when you look at this basic 4 door box. But opening the hood is no laughing matter, as you are stared-down by a high-strung big block Ford FE engine breathing through dual 4 barrels atop a mid-rise aluminum intake, high-flow heads, a solid lifter cam, and snarling through header-like cast iron exhaust manifolds. This one has a few chrome touches beyond the valve covers, like the radiator expansion tank and the fan shroud, but nothing looks upgraded from stock. Manual brakes and steering add to the experience of keeping this flying brick on course. It does have heavy duty suspension and oversized drum brakes behind 14” stamped steel wheels wearing conservative hubcaps. The rear axle is a tough 9” unit managed by heavy leaf springs and shock absorbers, but a canon-carver she ain’t. But that park bench seat discourages high-speed turning maneuvers, no matter how hard you white knuckle the steering wheel. But this one shines in a straight line, and no doubt ranks as one of the top sleepers in The Brothers Collection. #1963Ford #Musclecar #Sleeper 1963 Ford 300 427 4-Speed 4 Door Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 309 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MuscleCarOfTheWeek/
1963 Ford 300 427 4-Speed 4 Door Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 309
We normally don’t associate high-performance 1960s cars with having 4 doors, but we also don’t see many 1960s 4-door sedans powered by high-compression, dual-quad fed 427s with 4-speed hanging on them from the factory! Well this is just such a machine. And we have to correct ourselves already… we called this one a “Custom 300” in the intro, but in fact, Ford’s low-price entry in the full size field was just named the 300 for 1963, a name used for a single year model, even though low-price full size Fords had been around for decades. The 300 shared the chassis, suspension, drivetrains, and other basic structural elements with the flashier Galaxie and Galaxie 500, but it was far more bare-bones, without fancy trim or other luxury items. Most were straight six or small V8 powered with manuals on the column. 300s were slab-sided sleds sold in several solid skins set off by 3 selections of seat stain. Some suggest it’s short on style, but we think simple is solid when it’s served with serious steam. 300s were also used largely in fleet vehicle trim, ranging from taxicabs to police cars. Interestingly, Ford had several levels of Police Car trim offerings in ‘63, ranging from the 138 HP six-cylinder Deputy model designed for “General Purpose” police work, the Police Sentinel, with it’s small block 260 V8 making 164 HP of law enforcement power, the 352 powered Guardian, for “all around” police work, up to the 330-hp 390 powered Interceptor versions, far more capable of chasing down bad guys on their way out of Mayberry. But our 300 is even more than that, although we really don’t know if it ever served in a municipal capacity. The black and blue color scheme sure looks official. 300s could be ordered with any of the Ford V8s, including the 425 HP 427, no matter how many doors it had. We’re not exactly sure how many of these were built, but it’s not many. Inside, this 4-door 300 is as bare as they come, with giant flat bench seats, crank-up windows, minimal trim, and very few amenities. This one sports an AM radio and a heater, but perhaps the most important feature is the 4-speed shifter in front of the bench seat. Outside, the only indicator of this beasts potential is the little 427 badge on the fender, which almost seems like a gag when you look at this basic 4 door box. But opening the hood is no laughing matter, as you are stared-down by a high-strung big block Ford FE engine breathing through dual 4 barrels atop a mid-rise aluminum intake, high-flow heads, a solid lifter cam, and snarling through header-like cast iron exhaust manifolds. This one has a few chrome touches beyond the valve covers, like the radiator expansion tank and the fan shroud, but nothing looks upgraded from stock. Manual brakes and steering add to the experience of keeping this flying brick on course. It does have heavy duty suspension and oversized drum brakes behind 14” stamped steel wheels wearing conservative hubcaps. The rear axle is a tough 9” unit managed by heavy leaf springs and shock absorbers, but a canon-carver she ain’t. But that park bench seat discourages high-speed turning maneuvers, no matter how hard you white knuckle the steering wheel. But this one shines in a straight line, and no doubt ranks as one of the top sleepers in The Brothers Collection. #1963Ford #Musclecar #Sleeper 1963 Ford 300 427 4-Speed 4 Door Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 309 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MuscleCarOfTheWeek/
1968 Dodge Hemi Dart 426 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 308
There were about 80 Dodge Darts factory upfitted with the 426 Hemi V8 back in 1968, and this one is a very well known example. Mickey Weise started off drag racing a big-block Camaro back in the day, but when the 426 Hemi cars were passing him at the big end of the drag strip, he eventually made the move to Dodge, first in a bigger ‘65 A990, and finally taking over his partner’s ‘68 Hemi Dart that we see here today. Hemi Darts are a special breed, for sure. They were pulled from the Hamtramck, Michigan assembly line as unfinished 383 powered Dart GTS cars, then were sent to the Hurst Performance Research Facility for the option code LO23 conversion into the lightweight dragstrip warriors you see here today. They were designed to compete in the white-hot NHRA Super Stock drag class, and were put on a healthy diet to remove excess weight wherever possible. The new fenders and hood were fiberglass, and the doors and bumpers were submerged in Nitric Acid, a process which thins and lightens the steel panels. Glass was swapped for lexan panels, and the standard Dodge van seats were swapped after the interior was gutted of everything from the radio and heat to sound deadeners and even window regulators. The weight savings was substantial, as a Hemi Dart tipped the scales right at 3000 lbs. The quarter panel wheel openings were enlarged to accommodate oversized racing slicks, and the work was done quickly and fairly crudely. The rear leaf springs were moved inboard to make even more room, and the Dana rear axle was stuffed with 4.86:1 gears when coupled with the 727 Torqueflite automatic transmission like this car has. Manuals were also built, but the 2600 RPM stall converter in the strong and reliable torqueflite made for consistent passes, and minimized the risk of over-revving the Hemi while wrestling with the New Process 4-speed manual. The cars were delivered in gray primer with the fiberglass parts in black gelcoat, allowing racers to paint them as they wished. This one evolved from being painted gold and white - the beginning of a candy-red paint job, but they ran out of time after spraying the gold base and didn’t get the red done in time. After a few seasons, it was completed in red and white with some cool lace graphics, but today has been repainted solid red and white. Hemi Darts were powered by the 12.5:1 compression race 426 Hemi V8 engine, complete with dual 4-barrel carbs on a cross-ram style intake manifold. These cars did what they set out to do, and Mickey recalls going 10.19 at 132 in 1972. Chrysler backing dried up at that time, so Mickey stored and eventually sold the car, but got it back in the 1980s and ran it again until 2000 when it landed a spot in the NHRA Museum in Pomona, CA, and also a Hot Wheels car tribute. 50 Hemi Darts were slated for production, but sources say there might have been 82 actually built. Today, Mickey’s Dart is a revered rock star of The Brothers Collection. #426 #HemiDart #Musclecar 1968 Dodge Hemi Dart 426 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 308 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MuscleCarOfTheWeek/
1968 Dodge Hemi Dart 426 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 308
There were about 80 Dodge Darts factory upfitted with the 426 Hemi V8 back in 1968, and this one is a very well known example. Mickey Weise started off drag racing a big-block Camaro back in the day, but when the 426 Hemi cars were passing him at the big end of the drag strip, he eventually made the move to Dodge, first in a bigger ‘65 A990, and finally taking over his partner’s ‘68 Hemi Dart that we see here today. Hemi Darts are a special breed, for sure. They were pulled from the Hamtramck, Michigan assembly line as unfinished 383 powered Dart GTS cars, then were sent to the Hurst Performance Research Facility for the option code LO23 conversion into the lightweight dragstrip warriors you see here today. They were designed to compete in the white-hot NHRA Super Stock drag class, and were put on a healthy diet to remove excess weight wherever possible. The new fenders and hood were fiberglass, and the doors and bumpers were submerged in Nitric Acid, a process which thins and lightens the steel panels. Glass was swapped for lexan panels, and the standard Dodge van seats were swapped after the interior was gutted of everything from the radio and heat to sound deadeners and even window regulators. The weight savings was substantial, as a Hemi Dart tipped the scales right at 3000 lbs. The quarter panel wheel openings were enlarged to accommodate oversized racing slicks, and the work was done quickly and fairly crudely. The rear leaf springs were moved inboard to make even more room, and the Dana rear axle was stuffed with 4.86:1 gears when coupled with the 727 Torqueflite automatic transmission like this car has. Manuals were also built, but the 2600 RPM stall converter in the strong and reliable torqueflite made for consistent passes, and minimized the risk of over-revving the Hemi while wrestling with the New Process 4-speed manual. The cars were delivered in gray primer with the fiberglass parts in black gelcoat, allowing racers to paint them as they wished. This one evolved from being painted gold and white - the beginning of a candy-red paint job, but they ran out of time after spraying the gold base and didn’t get the red done in time. After a few seasons, it was completed in red and white with some cool lace graphics, but today has been repainted solid red and white. Hemi Darts were powered by the 12.5:1 compression race 426 Hemi V8 engine, complete with dual 4-barrel carbs on a cross-ram style intake manifold. These cars did what they set out to do, and Mickey recalls going 10.19 at 132 in 1972. Chrysler backing dried up at that time, so Mickey stored and eventually sold the car, but got it back in the 1980s and ran it again until 2000 when it landed a spot in the NHRA Museum in Pomona, CA, and also a Hot Wheels car tribute. 50 Hemi Darts were slated for production, but sources say there might have been 82 actually built. Today, Mickey’s Dart is a revered rock star of The Brothers Collection. #426 #HemiDart #Musclecar 1968 Dodge Hemi Dart 426 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 308 V8TV SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/RIkdDS http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MuscleCarOfTheWeek/
New Features from Muscle Car Of The Week Episode 307 V8TV
This week, we’re answering a few viewer mail questions as well as previewing some new features on Muscle Car Of The Week from The Brothers Collection Topics include: - Viewer Mail - V8TV vs. Muscle Car Of The Week - The Steven Juliano Collection - Muscle Car and Corvette Nationals - New Personalities on Muscle Car Of The Week - The V8 Radio Podcast Listen and subscribe to V8 Radio: http://bit.ly/V8Radio http://www.v8radio.com And more! #MuscleCar #TheBrothersCollection #MCACN New Features from Muscle Car Of The Week Episode 307 V8TV
New Features from Muscle Car Of The Week Episode 307 V8TV
This week, we’re answering a few viewer mail questions as well as previewing some new features on Muscle Car Of The Week from The Brothers Collection Topics include: - Viewer Mail - V8TV vs. Muscle Car Of The Week - The Steven Juliano Collection - Muscle Car and Corvette Nationals - New Personalities on Muscle Car Of The Week - The V8 Radio Podcast Listen and subscribe to V8 Radio: http://bit.ly/V8Radio http://www.v8radio.com And more! #MuscleCar #TheBrothersCollection #MCACN New Features from Muscle Car Of The Week Episode 307 V8TV
1967 Ford Fairlane 427 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 306 V8TV
A car so hot, it came with a warning letter! We take modern car reliability for granted, but back when this ‘67 Fairlane was new, Ford actually included a letter to the new owner stating that this monster wasn’t intended for highway or general passenger car use! The mid 60s saw the light weight Galaxies racing in superstock, aerodynamic Galaxies competing on NASCAR speedways, Shelby Cobras and GT 350s winning on road race tracks, and no one can ever forget the historic 123 win at the 1966 Le Mans where ford GT 40s beat Ferrari on the world stage. That racing technology truly trickled down to the streets, directly resulting in our 1967 Fairlane 500 feature car, and average guy version of an NHRA superstock drag car for the street. The Fairlane is a mid-size car, bigger than the Falcon, but not as heavy as the Galaxie. Their accommodating underhood space allowed for the installation of any of the Ford V8s of the day, and only 229 ended up like this one, stuffed with the notorious R-code 427. It's the drivetrain that is so special on these cars. Starting with the 427 in.³ FE series engine, a thin wall, high compression, tight tolerance racing V8 topped with 2 4 barrel carburetors perched on a medium rise intake manifold, high flow cylinder heads, high compression pistons, a solid lifter camshaft, and free-flowing exhaust manifolds. The factory tune claimed 425 hp and 480 pound feet of torque. This one is hooked to a heavy duty clutch and a four-speed transmission. A stout 9 inch rear end is loaded with 3.89:1 gears and the limited slip differential allowing for hard launches on the dragstrip, or the street. The dealer warning letter warned of decreased fuel economy, increased oil consumption, and high idle. When I was a kid, a neighbor had a Fairlane like this one, even the same color, but it was a 390 car. I’ll never forget my bigwheel-eye view of this thing, and how the dual exhaust rumble nearly literally blew me away. Today, this whole car blows me away. The stacked headlights and pronounced grille are popular styling language for the time, and it still looks great today. We dig the red, white, and blue crest in the grille. The headlights suggestively lean forward giving a speedy appearance, and the sloping rear roofline makes for a slick profile. Painted steel wheels topped with dog-dish caps and white pinstripe tires add to the classy look. The lower side trim almost looks stripe-ish, but this car is devoid of anything that suggests its performance capabilities… save for the 427 badges on the fenders. Interior styling is the definition of “clean”, with acres of blue vinyl to match the outside, only interrupted by the occasional slab of woodgrain door trim and chrome dash trim. This car has an interesting redline on the speedo, warning that you’ve crossed the 70 MPH mark, but there is no tachometer. Heater controls are tucked in below the AM radio, and the 4-speed stick pops up through the floor, without the need for a console to pretty things up. Bench-seat 4-speed cars are all business. This one is one of the nicest examples of an R-code 1967 Ford Fairlane, and it’s wearing most of it’s original Brittany Blue paint. It drives, and runs, like new. From The Brothers Collection. #427 #Fairlane #Musclecar 1967 Ford Fairlane 427 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 306 V8TV
1967 Ford Fairlane 427 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 306 V8TV
A car so hot, it came with a warning letter! We take modern car reliability for granted, but back when this ‘67 Fairlane was new, Ford actually included a letter to the new owner stating that this monster wasn’t intended for highway or general passenger car use! The mid 60s saw the light weight Galaxies racing in superstock, aerodynamic Galaxies competing on NASCAR speedways, Shelby Cobras and GT 350s winning on road race tracks, and no one can ever forget the historic 123 win at the 1966 Le Mans where ford GT 40s beat Ferrari on the world stage. That racing technology truly trickled down to the streets, directly resulting in our 1967 Fairlane 500 feature car, and average guy version of an NHRA superstock drag car for the street. The Fairlane is a mid-size car, bigger than the Falcon, but not as heavy as the Galaxie. Their accommodating underhood space allowed for the installation of any of the Ford V8s of the day, and only 229 ended up like this one, stuffed with the notorious R-code 427. It's the drivetrain that is so special on these cars. Starting with the 427 in.³ FE series engine, a thin wall, high compression, tight tolerance racing V8 topped with 2 4 barrel carburetors perched on a medium rise intake manifold, high flow cylinder heads, high compression pistons, a solid lifter camshaft, and free-flowing exhaust manifolds. The factory tune claimed 425 hp and 480 pound feet of torque. This one is hooked to a heavy duty clutch and a four-speed transmission. A stout 9 inch rear end is loaded with 3.89:1 gears and the limited slip differential allowing for hard launches on the dragstrip, or the street. The dealer warning letter warned of decreased fuel economy, increased oil consumption, and high idle. When I was a kid, a neighbor had a Fairlane like this one, even the same color, but it was a 390 car. I’ll never forget my bigwheel-eye view of this thing, and how the dual exhaust rumble nearly literally blew me away. Today, this whole car blows me away. The stacked headlights and pronounced grille are popular styling language for the time, and it still looks great today. We dig the red, white, and blue crest in the grille. The headlights suggestively lean forward giving a speedy appearance, and the sloping rear roofline makes for a slick profile. Painted steel wheels topped with dog-dish caps and white pinstripe tires add to the classy look. The lower side trim almost looks stripe-ish, but this car is devoid of anything that suggests its performance capabilities… save for the 427 badges on the fenders. Interior styling is the definition of “clean”, with acres of blue vinyl to match the outside, only interrupted by the occasional slab of woodgrain door trim and chrome dash trim. This car has an interesting redline on the speedo, warning that you’ve crossed the 70 MPH mark, but there is no tachometer. Heater controls are tucked in below the AM radio, and the 4-speed stick pops up through the floor, without the need for a console to pretty things up. Bench-seat 4-speed cars are all business. This one is one of the nicest examples of an R-code 1967 Ford Fairlane, and it’s wearing most of it’s original Brittany Blue paint. It drives, and runs, like new. From The Brothers Collection. #427 #Fairlane #Musclecar 1967 Ford Fairlane 427 Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 306 V8TV
1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda : Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 305 V8TV
This well-known ‘71 Hemi Cuda has nearly everything going for it! Ordering a brand-new 1971 Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda was an exciting experience, especially if you had the means to check lots of option boxes at the dealer. Well the original purchaser of this car had a lot of lead in his pencil. This amazing 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda was ordered new by a man named Zach Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco tycoon R.J. Reynolds. Zach grew up in an enviable position, with nearly unlimited financial resources, and could have easily carried himself above the common man. But that couldn’t be farther from the truth, as Zach was not just a gearhead with a bank account… he was more hands-on than most of us could ever dream to be. For example, he didn’t just own a plane, he was a national champion aerobatic pilot many years over. He didn’t just collect guns, he was a national pistol champion. He defused bombs for the U.S. Navy, raced cars and motorcycles all over the world, and operated a HAM Radio station when he wasn’t on the road. In fact, he used his HAM reach to help locate organs and donors for people in need all over the country… no doubt helping land his “Dr. Zach” nickname. He possessed high-intelligence, but could also take his cars and bikes apart, repair or modify them, and put them back together… often times just to show people how the things worked. Zach Reynolds was a unique kind of dude for sure. So it’s no wonder that he hand-picked this ‘71 Cuda for his collection. It’s powered by the legendary 426 Hemi V8 twisting a torqflite 727 automatic transmission, with the super track pak Dana 60 rear end and firm ride suspension. It looks fast thanks to the optional spoiler package, complete with lower front air dam and the pedestal mount rear spoiler. The red is balanced by the black HEMI billboard stripes on the quarters, and even more so by the vinyl top and black rear window slats. But there are many more add ons that are not quite as obvious. Inside, you’ll find a rally dash, with the 150 MPH speedo and 8000 RPM tach, oil pressure gauge, clock, and resettable trip meter. That’s all lit up with optional time-delay dash floodlighting and a time-delay ignition key light. Zach enjoyed the ride from the unusual bench-seat interior. The AM / FM Stereo tape system goes one further with the optional recording function and microphone, allowing you to leave yourself some voice notes, or maybe record your favorite song while you burn up the quarter mile. That hi-fi rig added $347 to the bottom line. Zach added his own feature in the illuminated ash tray… those Winston cigarette buts are believed to be his. Today, this proud fish shows just over 2100 miles on the odometer, and stands as one of the most original and highest-optioned example of the breed. We’ve been told it still has factory-filled fluids on board. Cars like these don’t come around very often, much like Mr. Reynolds. His life was unfortunately cut short in 1979 at the age of 41, as he perished as a passenger in a plane crash flown by a young new pilot. With as many cars, trucks, and bikes as he had, it’s no wonder this one only racked up a couple thousand miles on the odometer. Today, the ‘Cuda and it’s story live on in The Brothers Collection. This ‘Cuda would be one of the most interesting Muscle Cars in the world even if it didn’t have an interesting owner as well. We’re glad you took the time to check it out, what do you think? #hemicuda #426hemi #Musclecar 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda : Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 305 V8TV http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com - FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MuscleCarOfTheWeek/
1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda : Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 305 V8TV
This well-known ‘71 Hemi Cuda has nearly everything going for it! Ordering a brand-new 1971 Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda was an exciting experience, especially if you had the means to check lots of option boxes at the dealer. Well the original purchaser of this car had a lot of lead in his pencil. This amazing 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda was ordered new by a man named Zach Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco tycoon R.J. Reynolds. Zach grew up in an enviable position, with nearly unlimited financial resources, and could have easily carried himself above the common man. But that couldn’t be farther from the truth, as Zach was not just a gearhead with a bank account… he was more hands-on than most of us could ever dream to be. For example, he didn’t just own a plane, he was a national champion aerobatic pilot many years over. He didn’t just collect guns, he was a national pistol champion. He defused bombs for the U.S. Navy, raced cars and motorcycles all over the world, and operated a HAM Radio station when he wasn’t on the road. In fact, he used his HAM reach to help locate organs and donors for people in need all over the country… no doubt helping land his “Dr. Zach” nickname. He possessed high-intelligence, but could also take his cars and bikes apart, repair or modify them, and put them back together… often times just to show people how the things worked. Zach Reynolds was a unique kind of dude for sure. So it’s no wonder that he hand-picked this ‘71 Cuda for his collection. It’s powered by the legendary 426 Hemi V8 twisting a torqflite 727 automatic transmission, with the super track pak Dana 60 rear end and firm ride suspension. It looks fast thanks to the optional spoiler package, complete with lower front air dam and the pedestal mount rear spoiler. The red is balanced by the black HEMI billboard stripes on the quarters, and even more so by the vinyl top and black rear window slats. But there are many more add ons that are not quite as obvious. Inside, you’ll find a rally dash, with the 150 MPH speedo and 8000 RPM tach, oil pressure gauge, clock, and resettable trip meter. That’s all lit up with optional time-delay dash floodlighting and a time-delay ignition key light. Zach enjoyed the ride from the unusual bench-seat interior. The AM / FM Stereo tape system goes one further with the optional recording function and microphone, allowing you to leave yourself some voice notes, or maybe record your favorite song while you burn up the quarter mile. That hi-fi rig added $347 to the bottom line. Zach added his own feature in the illuminated ash tray… those Winston cigarette buts are believed to be his. Today, this proud fish shows just over 2100 miles on the odometer, and stands as one of the most original and highest-optioned example of the breed. We’ve been told it still has factory-filled fluids on board. Cars like these don’t come around very often, much like Mr. Reynolds. His life was unfortunately cut short in 1979 at the age of 41, as he perished as a passenger in a plane crash flown by a young new pilot. With as many cars, trucks, and bikes as he had, it’s no wonder this one only racked up a couple thousand miles on the odometer. Today, the ‘Cuda and it’s story live on in The Brothers Collection. This ‘Cuda would be one of the most interesting Muscle Cars in the world even if it didn’t have an interesting owner as well. We’re glad you took the time to check it out, what do you think? #hemicuda #426hemi #Musclecar 1971 Plymouth Hemi Cuda : Muscle Car Of The Week Video Episode 305 V8TV http://www.musclecaroftheweek.com - FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MuscleCarOfTheWeek/
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Podcast Details
Started
Mar 24th, 2017
Latest Episode
Aug 16th, 2019
Release Period
Weekly
No. of Episodes
183
Avg. Episode Length
10 minutes
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