Super Awesome Science Show (SASS)

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It’s time for the Super Awesome Science Show SASS Class on vaccines. I want to thank everyone who reached out to me. We received quite a few Emails and DMs about the episode although as we saw with airborne spread, most of them centred on a similar theme or topic. Then there was one that seemed to come from everyone - will a vaccine get us back to normal? You’ll definitely want to hear the answer.   Our guest is again Peter Hotez, who is the Dean for the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and the co-Director for the Center for Vaccine Development at the Texas Children’s Hospital.  If you didn’t hear your question, make sure to contact me on Twitter, by Email and now, via voice message at Speakpipe.com/SASS. Just follow the link below and send me your thoughts.   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comGuest:Peter Hotezhttps://www.bcm.edu/people-search/peter-hotez-23229   Books by Peter Hotezhttps://www.amazon.com/Books-Peter-Hotez/s?rh=n%3A283155%2Cp_27%3APeter+Hotez   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
There’s no doubt vaccines have changed our world for the better. We’ve been able to save countless lives from several infectious diseases and managed to eradicate one of the deadliest, smallpox, off the planet. Now people are calling for a vaccine to fight COVID-19 to ensure it is controlled, eliminated and eventually eradicated. For this episode, we reached out to Peter Hotez. He’s spent decades developing vaccines and has been a leader in the COVID vaccine movement. He’s the Dean for the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and the co-Director for the Center for Vaccine Development at the Texas Children’s Hospital.  While this discussion will be enlightening, I’m sure you will have questions. Which is why I hope you reach out to me on Twitter, by Email, or via voice message at Speakpipe.com/SASS. Just follow the link below and send me your thoughts.   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comVoice Message: https://speakpipe.com/SASS  Guest:Peter Hotezhttps://www.bcm.edu/people-search/peter-hotez-23229   Books by Peter Hotezhttps://www.amazon.com/Books-Peter-Hotez/s?rh=n%3A283155%2Cp_27%3APeter+Hotez   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
It’s time for the Super Awesome Science Show SASS Class on panic.. I want to thank everyone who reached out to me. We received several questions, many of which were asked more than once. And then there was one that it seems everyone wanted to ask.  Our guest is again Mark Honigsbaum at the City University of London, author of the book, “The Pandemic Century: One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria and Hubris.”    If you didn’t hear your question, make sure to contact me on Twitter, by Email and now, via voice message at Speakpipe.com/SASS. Just follow the link below and send me your thoughts.   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comVoice Message: https://speakpipe.com/SASS  Guest:Mark Honigsbaumhttps://www.city.ac.uk/people/academics/mark-honigsbaum  “The Pandemic Century: One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria and Hubris”https://www.hurstpublishers.com/book/the-pandemic-century/  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
When infections strike, it’s normal for people to be concerned. Depending on the extent of spread within a community, that concern can deepen leading to individual panic and mass hysteria. Whie this is rare for most outbreaks, it is almost guaranteed when large scale epidemics and pandemics occur.  This week, we’re going to explore the science behind the panic with Mark Honigsbaum, a Senior Lecturer in Journalism at the City University of London. Last year, he wrote “The Pandemic Century: One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria and Hubris” and it offers a fascinating glimpse into how pandemics affect us.  While we do tackle a number of topics, when it comes to the way society reacts to a contagion, there are always questions  If you have any questions, reach out to me on Twitter, by Email, or via voice message at Speakpipe.com/SASS. Just follow the link below and send me your thoughts.   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comVoice Message: https://speakpipe.com/SASS  Guest:Mark Honigsbaumhttps://www.city.ac.uk/people/academics/mark-honigsbaum  “The Pandemic Century: One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria and Hubris”https://www.hurstpublishers.com/book/the-pandemic-century/  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
It’s time for the Super Awesome Science Show SASS Class, mask edition. Once again, I was thrilled to see so many questions and want to thank everyone who reached out to me on Twitter, by Email, and also at speakpipe.com. This is definitely a controversial topic and I’m glad we’ll be able to discuss this topic further. I have M. Taher Saif with me to help answer those questions. He’s the he Edward William and Jane Marr Gutgsell Professor at the Grainger College of Engineering at the University of Illinois who studied the effectiveness of homemade masks. We had quite a few questions this week and I hope we can continue this trend. I’d also love to put you on the show. Send me a voice message at https://speakpipe.com/SASS  and tell me what is on your mind. Especially if you didn’t hear your question on this episode.  I do hope you enjoy this new style of The Super Awesome Science Show SASS Class and ask that you take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts and be sure to tell a friend about the show. Thanks to you, we are a two-time Canadian Podcast Award winner. Keeping the awesome momentum going is more important than ever as we need to work together to fight off this pandemic. In the meantime, stay calm, stay safe, stay informed, and as always, make sure to show ‘em some SASS. Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comVoice Message: https://speakpipe.com/SASS  Guest:M. Taher Saifhttps://mechanical.illinois.edu/directory/profile/saif See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
When dealing with a respiratory virus like the common cold, influenza, and SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19, a mask is without a doubt one of the best ways to protect yourself. But, masks are not perfect. You need to be sure you have enough of them for one. And then you have to make sure they work to protect you. After all, why wear something that is just going to let the droplets in.  We’re going to explore how masks work and why homemade masks may be better for you than those medical ones you see in healthcare facilities..  Our guest is M. Taher Saif and he is the Edward William and Jane Marr Gutgsell Professor at the Grainger College of Engineering at the University of Illinois. He’s studied the effectiveness of masks and is here to explain the science behind masks.  I’ll try to hit as many topics as possible but am sure you will have more questions. To ask our guest or maybe me, just reach out on Twitter, by Email and now, via voice message at Speakpipe.com/SASS. Just follow the link below and send me your thoughts.   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comVoice Message: https://speakpipe.com/SASS  Guest:M. Taher Saifhttps://mechanical.illinois.edu/directory/profile/saif Study: Performance of fabrics for home-made masks against the spread of COVID-19 through droplets: A quantitative mechanistic studyhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352431620301802 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
It’s time for the Super Awesome Science Show SASS Class, airborne spread edition. I have to admit, I was taken aback by the questions and want to thank everyone who reached out to me on Twitter, by Email, and also at speakpipe.com. I know this subject is both scary and surprising and appreciate that we need answers. It’s why I have Steven Rogak with me to answer those questions. He’s a mechanical engineering professor at the University of British Columbia and a world expert on the morphology, transport properties and dynamics of aerosol nanoparticles, which happen to include viruses like SARS-CoV-2. Most of the questions happen to fall into one of a few categories so for this class, I’ve taken the most popular and am asking them. In the future, we’ll be playing some of your voice messages at speakpipe.com/SASS so be sure to reach out to me and tell me what is on your mind. Especially if you didn’t hear your question on this episode.  I do hope you enjoy this new style of The Super Awesome Science Show SASS Class and ask that you take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts and be sure to tell a friend about the show. Thanks to you, we are a two-time Canadian Podcast Award winner. Keeping the awesome momentum going is more important than ever as we need to work together to fight off this pandemic. In the meantime, stay calm, stay safe, stay informed, and as always, make sure to show ‘em some SASS. Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comVoice Message: https://speakpipe.com/SASS    Guest:Steven Rogakhttps://mech.ubc.ca/steven-rogak/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
We are back for Season 2 of the Super Awesome Science Show! It’s been a year unlike any other thanks to, COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019) and the virus that causes this illness, SARS-CoV-2. We’ve received numerous questions over the course of the year and want to answer as many of them as possible. And this week, we’re going into one of the most confusing and hotly debated topics of this pandemic: how does the virus spread in the air? Our guest for the entire show is Steven Rogak. He is a mechanical engineering professor at the University of British Columbia. He is a world-leading expert on the morphology, transport properties and dynamics of aerosol nanoparticles, which happen to include viruses like SARS-CoV-2. If there is anyone who can guide us through the strange world of airborne spread, it’s him and trust me, you are in for a treat. This year, giving you the chance to ask questions. Reach out to me on Twitter, by Email and now, via voice message at Speakpipe.com/SASS. Just follow the link below and send me your thoughts.   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comVoice Message: https://speakpipe.com/SASS    Guest:Steven Rogakhttps://mech.ubc.ca/steven-rogak/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
It’s time for the Super Awesome Science Show SASS Class on the second wave.. I want to thank everyone who reached out to me on Twitter, by Email, and also at speakpipe.com. I know this subject is not only present in our minds but also under much debate. It’s why I have Patrick Saunders-Hastings with me to answer those questions. He is an epidemiologist and risk scientist who teaches at Carleton University. He has expertise in global health, infectious disease epidemiology and emergency preparedness and his research interests include pandemic influenza preparedness This year, we’re giving you the chance to ask questions. Reach out to me on Twitter, by Email and now, via voice message at Speakpipe.com/SASS. Just follow the link below and send me your thoughts.   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comVoice Message: https://speakpipe.com/SASS  Guest:Patrick Saunders-Hastingshttps://carleton.ca/healthsciences/people/patrick-saunders-hastings/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
We are back for Season 2 of the Super Awesome Science Show! It’s been a year unlike any other thanks to, COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019) and the virus that causes this illness, SARS-CoV-2. We’ve received numerous questions over the course of the year and want to answer as many of them as possible. And this week, we’re going into one of the most troubling issues facing us at this very moment: the second wave. It has been looming ever since the pandemic began but despite the focus on it over the last months, it still remains to many a mystery.  Our guest has been looking at pandemics of the past and why these second waves happen. He’s Patrick Saunders-Hastings and he is an epidemiologist and risk scientist who teaches at Carleton University. He has expertise in global health, infectious disease epidemiology and emergency preparedness and his research interests include pandemic influenza preparedness This year, we’re giving you the chance to ask questions. Reach out to me on Twitter, by Email and now, via voice message at Speakpipe.com/SASS. Just follow the link below and send me your thoughts.   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.comVoice Message: https://speakpipe.com/SASS  Guest:Patrick Saunders-Hastingshttps://carleton.ca/healthsciences/people/patrick-saunders-hastings/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
After an awesome first season, we took a well-deserved break. In that time, the world has changed and as much as we want to talk about the science of love, food, and even UFOs, we cannot ignore the massive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.  So that’s what we’ll focus at the start of our second season… We’re going to deal with  topics that are in the news but maybe need more explanation like what does it really mean that the virus is airborne spread,  what is the second wave and we’ll even look at the science of grieg.  We’re also going to answer your questions by dedicating SASS Class  episodes to doing just that… so please get your questions into me via twitter @JATetro A new season of  the Super Awesome Science Show starts September 28th so head over to Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts or wherever you get your streaming audio and make sure to subscribe so you don’t miss an episode.  It’s almost time to get started…let’s show them some SASS! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Today, we’re joined by scientist and host of the Super Awesome Science Show Jason Tetro to talk about what we know about how the coronavirus spreads and how to properly practice social distancing. As we’re at the point now where health officials are saying the only way to slow the spread of COVID-19 is through social distancing. But the thing is, in order for us to have any kind of impact and get back to our normal lives, experts are stressing that we have to do it properly. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
This week, we’re going to explore the problems associated with lead exposure and lead poisoning that you may not have heard in the news. We’ll learn about how it impacts intelligence and also may affect the mental health not of just the exposed, but also their children. And in our SASS Class, we’re going to find out why it is so difficult to remove lead from our modern world and how you may still be able to stay safe Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: - Gina Muckle - Sidney Kennedy - Adrienne KatnerSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
It’s something that we all encounter. No matter how hard we try, we can’t seem to think straight. Our thoughts get jumbled and before we know it, we’re lost. We tend to call it being scatterbrained and for the most part, that’s considered a bad thing. On this week’s show, we’re going to look at the science behind this apparent flaw in our mental machinery and why it may be good for us when it comes to learning and understanding. Our guest for the entire show is Henning Beck, a neuroscientist, science slammer, consultant, and the author of the new book, Scatterbrain. We first explore why this problem occurs in the first place. It turns out that our brains can only do so much especially when it is learning and committing thoughts to memory. It’s impossible to collect a large number of individual pieces and so our brains tend to forget almost as fast as we learn. But as Beck explains, there is a better approach in the form of understanding. Putting items into context can help us develop links and that improves both memory and our actions in the future. We next discuss the issue of distractions. In our modern world, we are surrounded by them and this can quickly take us off any mental path. Beck reveals the reasons behind our inability to stay focused due to boredom, fear, and the ever present reality of fake news. We also find out whether isolation is the best option to ensure mental success.   In our SASS Class, Beck offers us ideas on how we can improve our brain function through a variety of different tactics he discusses in his book. We learn about curiosity, creativity, framing, and focusing mechanisms such as meditation and mindfulness. Some work, others don’t but in the end, Beck reveals that information for the brain is like food for our stomach. As long as we take the time to learn and digest the information, we can achieve great things.  If you enjoy The Super Awesome Science Show, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts and be sure to tell a friend about the show. Thanks to you, we won the Canadian Podcast Award for Outstanding Science and Medicine Series. Let’s keep the awesome momentum going together!  We have just completed our first year and we look forward to bringing you even more awesome science in the year ahead. Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: Henning BeckWeb: https://www.henning-beck.com/english/ Twitter: @HenningBeck1See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
We tend to go overboard on spending. If we are not careful, our celebrations of December can become a January curse that may last for the rest of the year. This week, we’re going to explore our tendency to spend money and how we can keep ourselves from falling into debt. Our guest for the entire show is Gail Vaz Oxlade, who is one of Canada’s best financial experts. She’s been an author, radio host, and the star of internationally acclaimed television programs such as Til Debt Do Us Part and Princess. If anyone can help us to understand how to ensure our bank accounts are as happy as we are during the Holidays, it’s her. We first start off by learning about her background and how she became Canada’s super nanny for money. We then learn about the science behind the tendency to go into debt. It’s a combination of psychological as well as societal factors. She also reveals some of the warning signs that can signal trouble is on the way including the one item most of us have in our wallets or purses that can make shopping easier and far more dangerous:  the credit card.    With the science set, we venture into the problems associated with shopping during the Holidays. Since we are hardwired to believe we can spend throughout the season, we need to be aware of the dangers that could lead us into debt. Gail shares with us her tips on how to enjoy yourself while making sure you don’t go overboard with the purchases. More importantly, she makes it clear that we need to focus not just on the joy of making a purchase, but also the pain of losing our money in the process. In our SASS Class, we discuss Gail’s newest venture in helping us to be financially smart. It’s a new master class she is providing on Twitter. Her hope is to convey the necessary steps and then let us optimize it to find a personal fit that will last. Because as she makes clear, it’s not hard to be economically secure, but you need to be committed to it. Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: Gail Vaz OxladeTwitter: @GailVazOxladeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
As we get ready for the holidays we thought we would share with you this episode about the smells of the Holiday Season in case you missed it in the hustle and bustle of the most wonderful time of the year. On this week’s episode of the Super Awesome Science Show, we stick our noses into the science of smelling, scientifically known as olfaction, and find out how certain scents can draw out attention, bring back memories, and even affect our buying behaviour. We first talk with Dr. Leslie Cameron at Carthage College. She’s been studying how we detect and recognize odours throughout life and how we can equate some aromas with the festive season. Next we hear from renowned smellosopher, Dr. Ann-Sophie Barwich at Indiana University Bloomington. She’s examining how certain odours can be autobiographical in nature leading us to open up memories of times of past Holidays and other moment long gone by. In our SASS Class, we speak with Dr. Jenny Lin at California State University Monterey Bay. She’s researching how the sense of smell affects our brains through what is known as event-related potential. As she tells us, the right combination of odours may prompt us to stick around in a store and inevitably buy more.  If you enjoy The Super Awesome Science Show, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts, tell us what you think and please tell a friend about the show. Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests:Dr. Leslie Cameron, Carthage CollegeWebsite: https://www.carthage.edu/live/profiles/261-leslie-cameron Dr. Ann-Sophie Barwich, Indiana University BloomingtonTwitter: @smellosopherWebsite: http://www.smellosophy.com/ Dr. Jenny Lin, California State University Monterey BayWebsite: https://csumb.edu/directory/people/jenny-linSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
This week we're introducing you to a new podcast called Issue Zero to answer the questions what makes Aliens and the Xenomorph, so terrifying? and could a scenario like Alien happen here on earth? Taking you on this voyage of discover is your host, not in a parasitic way, Fred Kennedy, and he'll share with you the backstory on the Alien film franchise…and more specifically, its star player…the Xenomorph. He's joined by Johnnie Christmas, who just adapted the original William Gibson screenplay for Alien 3 into a comic for Darkhorse…and is a guy who’s knee deep in the ORIGINAL source material to find our what makes these creatures so terrifying. To answer whether humanity could survive a xenomorph invasion he looks to an actual scientist, Dan Riskin, former host of Daily Planet and a Canadian evolutionary biologist, television personality and producer.  Spoiler alert! both guests will not let you sleep at night. Host: Fred Kennedy Twitter @Fearless_Fred Facebook @fearlessfredontheradio Guests: Johnnie Christmas - @j_xmas Dan Riskin - @riskindanSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
This week, we’re going to look at one of the most revolutionary ideas to improve our planet. It’s called the zero emission vehicle – better known as ZEV – and it may be able to reduce our contribution to air pollution and possibly climate change. Most people may know the name Tesla, which is one of the first truly zero emission vehicles on the market. It runs on batteries like many others that are in the pipeline. But there are other types that exist including an engine that runs on hydrogen. Our first guest takes us on a guided tour of the hydrogen engine and why it may represent the real future of ZEVs. His name is Xianguo Li and he is a Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering Professor at the University of Waterloo. While ZEVs may seem like an excellent purchase, the reality is that there isn’t much of a demand for them. However, when people are asked about their perception of these vehicles, they are quite high. This is known as latent demand and our next guest reveals to us how we may be able to turn that interest into actual sales. She is Zoe Long and she is the Research Manager for the Sustainable Transport Action Research Team at Simon Fraser University. In our SASS Class, we learn about how governments and people who like ZEVs can improve sales. Our guest teacher is Scott Hardman and he is a professional researcher in the Plug-in Hybrid & Electric Vehicle Research Center, in the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California Davis. We learn about the different types of government incentives that exist and which country happens to have the greatest success in getting people to adopt ZEVs. We also find out that governments can only do so much and that word of mouth may still be the best way to increase purchases. If you enjoy The Super Awesome Science Show, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts and be sure to tell a friend about the show. Thanks to you, we won the Canadian Podcast Award for Outstanding Science and Medicine Series. Let’s keep the awesome momentum going together!  Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: XianGuo Li Web: https://uwaterloo.ca/mechanical-mechatronics-engineering/profile/x6li Zoe Long Web: https://sustainabletransport.ca/our-team/ Scott Hardman Web: https://its.ucdavis.edu/people/scott-hardman/ Twitter: @scottiehardman See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Cancer continues to be one of our greatest health concerns. According to the Canadian Cancer Society, nearly 1 in 2 Canadians will develop one form of cancer in their lifetimes. But treatments are getting better and more lives are being saved thanks to new treatments. On this week’s show, we’re going to take a closer look at three new strategies that may soon lead to cures and also vaccines. Our first guest is one of Canada’s premier cancer researchers, John Bell at the Ottawa Hopsital Research Institute. He has been working on ways to combat cancer for decades and his work is showing promise in clinical trials. But rather than chemotherapy or radiation, his approach is to use viruses and our own immune system. We first talk about the use of viruses to destroy cancer. Viruses are known to kill human cells and Bell has been programming certain types to target cancer cells while leaving our healthy cells alone. We explore how this is performed in the lab and how the process works in the human body. We also explore how viruses may one day be used as a vaccine to alert the immune system that something has gone wrong. We then discuss how cancer the immune system can also be used to improve the fight against cancer. Usually, cancers can avoid being detected by our immunity and grow without any worry for attack. Bell had found ways to develop immune cells that specifically look for tumours and kill them. They are known as Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cells, or CAR-T cells. This approach has been effective at tackling leukemia and research is showing we may be able to battle other cancers as well. As for making a vaccine, Bell suggests that we may be able to use these CAR-T cells as a means to train the immune system to identify cancers when they start and destroy them before they can cause harm. In our SASS Class, we look at an upcoming treatment that unfortunately is surrounded by hype. The use of stem cells. Our guest teacher is Riam Shamaa, who has been studying the effect of stem cells on various diseases including cancer. We explore how stem cells can be used to fight the disease and also why we are not yet at a stage when people should put their trust in this approach. It may be useful in the future but for the moment, you shouldn’t believe the hype. If you enjoy The Super Awesome Science Show, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts and be sure to tell a friend about the show. Thanks to you, we won the Canadian Podcast Award for Outstanding Science and Medicine Series. Let’s keep the awesome momentum going together!  Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: John BellWeb: http://www.ohri.ca/profile/jbell  Riam ShammaaWeb: www.Intellistemtech.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
We all have our mother tongue but over forty percent of the world’s population also can speak a second language. Bilingualism is a natural part of many people’s lives and research has tried to explore what this does to the brain and what the benefits happen to be for our lives. On this week’s show, we’re going to learn why having that second language can be good for your life and also your health.   Our first guest has been studying bilingualism for decades and is here to help us understand how it helps our lives. She is Judith Kroll and she is a Distinguished Professor of Language Science at the University of California, Irvine. Before we get into what bilingualism gives us, we learn about the process of learning a second language and why it is beneficial to learn earlier than later. We also explore the concept of codeswitching which allows a person to immediately change languages even in the middle of a sentence. We also explore how being immersed in a multilingual environment can be good for both your learned language as well as your mother tongue.   We then move on to the benefits that come with knowing more than one language. While this certainly allows us to travel and possibly increase our job potential in many sectors, some of the best benefits come in the way of improved health. We hear about how one the effects of our greatest concerns with aging, cognitive decline, can be helped by knowing that second language. The research reveals a that while our brains age, we may still be able to hold on to our abilities.   In our SASS Class, we take a different approach to knowing a second language. While we may tend to think of French, Spanish, Italian, Chinese, Russian, Hindi, and others as that bilingual choice, there are large segments of the population who focus on speaking fictional languages such as Klingon and Sindarin. Our guest teacher is David Peterson and he is the creator of two languages, Dothraki and High Valyrian from Game of Thrones. We learn about his experience becoming a language creator and how these dialects are formed. We also learn that these languages are just as useful to have as any other…as long as you are in a population hat speaks it. If you enjoy The Super Awesome Science Show, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts and be sure to tell a friend about the show. Thanks to you, we won the Canadian Podcast Award for Outstanding Science and Medicine Series. Let’s keep the awesome momentum going together!   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: Judith KrollWeb: https://bilingualismmindbrain.com/lab-members/judith-f-kroll/  David PetersonWeb: http://www.artoflanguageinvention.com/ Twitter: @Dedalvs See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
We all experience fear but few of us understand it. It  usually happens when we feel unsafe or threatened. It is both instinctual and learned. And for some, it can take over their lives while for others, it can be a source for excitement. On this week’s show, we’re going to take a closer look at fear and why it's such a strange and fascinating aspect of our existence. Our first guests are studying how fear exists in the brain and how it impacts our lives, They're Jacob Raber and Sydney Weber Boutros. He’s a professor of behavioural neuroscience at the Oregon Health and Science University and she is earning her doctorate in this field. They are taking the lead on a worldwide project known as Neuroqualia, which seeks to understand how our emotions affect us. We learn of the nature of fear from a biological perspective and the process of experiencing fear is far more complicated than you might think. It’s not simply a matter of being scared, it’s how we interpret the situation and respond based on our pasts. We explore the concept of fear memory and one of the most troubling consequences, post traumatic stress disorder, PTSD. We also find out how we may be able to extinguish certain fears by keeping our bodies and our minds in a safe place. Our next guest explores one of the side effects of fear – seeing things that don’t exist, scientifically called false agency detection. His name is Adam Tratner and he is a doctoral student at Oakland University. His research focuses on finding out what situations can lead to this phenomenon and whether it is fear rather than belief that causes us to experience the supernatural and paranormal.     In our SASS Class, we take a different look at fear – as entertainment. Our guest teacher is Glenn Sparks and he is a Professor of Communication at Purdue University. He’s explored why some people tend to love horror films and other fear-inducing violence and mayhem. We discuss what gives people that urge to venture into a theatre and get scared out of their minds. The answer happens to be less about the fear and more about the joy that comes with being safe.    Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: Jacob RaberWeb: https://www.ohsu.edu/people/jacob-raber/831E0CC1C990434DA01DB6D91753AD75 Sydney Weber BoutrosWeb: https://www.ohsu.edu/school-of-medicine/behavioral-neuroscience/sydney-weber-boutros Twitter: @SydWeberBoutros Adam TratnerWeb: https://adamtratner.com/ Glenn SparksWeb: https://cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/glenn-sparks.html Twitter: @purduesparSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Synthetic biology was once considered little more than science fiction. But with the rise of genetic engineering and the ability to make living cells in the lab, there is a real potential for this technology to change our lives for the better. Not surprisingly, this has led to much debate about whether we should use it or not. On this week’s show, we discover how “synbio” can help to improve our food security.   Our first guest is Lenore Newman and she is the Canada Research Chair in Food Security and Environment at the University of the Fraser Valley. She has been exploring the continual decline in our food supply and has authored the book, Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food. We first discuss the problems with our current food supply and the issues that need to be addressed. While we may believe climate change is the most important factor, Newman reveals many issues that can lead to a dwindling food supply. We next focus on the use of synthetic biology to help resolve some of these troubles. But rather than explore the use of genetically modified organisms, Newman explains that synthetic biology is better used to develop alternatives to our natural sources. From enzymes in milk needed to make cheese to meat alternatives, we learn about how synthetic biology isn’t just the future, it’s also happening right now. In our SASS Class, we learn about how synthetic biology is being used to transform food security in the developing world. Our guest teacher is Sabrina Marecos and she is a research associate at the National University of Asuncion in Paraguay. We hear how the technology is helping to transform the food economy and how one particular plant considered to be a staple in the natural health community is being helped by synbio. If you enjoy The Super Awesome Science Show, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts and be sure to tell a friend about the show. Thanks to you, we won the Canadian Podcast Award for Outstanding Science and Medicine Series. Let’s keep the awesome momentum going together!  Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: Lenore NewmanWeb: https://www.ufv.ca/geography/faculty-and-staff/faculty-members/newman-lenore.htm Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food - https://ecwpress.com/products/lost-feast Twitter: @DrLenoreNewman Sabrina Marecos Web: https://www.sabrinamarecos.com/  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Food security is a major concern as our populations increases and our food supply dwindles. Although efforts around the world are focused on trying to sustain our ability to eat, efforts in Africa tend to go unnoticed. This week, we’re going to look at the work being done in various regions across the continent and more importantly, how they are being led by women. Our first guest is Esther Ngumbi, who is originally from Eastern Kenya and is now a professor at the University of Illinois School of Integrative Biology. She focuses on drought and insects and is trying to develop ways to help crops stay viable in harsh conditions. Using a combination of genetics and microbes, she hopes to ensure that the farms where she was raised continue to offer significant yields to keep the population fed. We next travel to the Ivory Coast to talk with Virginie Mfegue, who is a Program Manager at the World Cocoa Foundation. We have heard in the past that our chocolate supply may end up disappearing in the coming decades thanks to several cocoa plant diseases. We hear about the efforts she is leading to tackle these problems and to ensure that we will be able to enjoy this guilty pleasure long into the future. Our third guest is Ruramiso Mashumba and she is the first ever woman Chairperson of the Zimbabwe Farmer’s Union Youth. Zimbabwe is an agricultural nation although it is underproducing. We learn of the work that is being done to improve farm yields and also to empower those who are most involved – women – in ensuring that the country will continue to be a significant contributor to our food supply. In our SASS Class, we look at the influence women are having on men to help ensure everyone gets involved in sustainable agriculture. Our guest teacher is Pacifique Nshimiyimana and he is the co-owner of Real Green Gold Limited, which works with banana famers to increase their market share in the industry. He explains how women inspired him to switch his focus from purely economic advancement to one that helps everyone through a better food supply.   If you enjoy The Super Awesome Science Show, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts and be sure to tell a friend about the show. Thanks to you, we won the Canadian Podcast Award for Outstanding Science and Medicine Series. Let’s keep the awesome momentum going together!   Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: Esther NgumbiWeb: https://sib.illinois.edu/profile/enn Twitter: @EstherNgumbiVirginie MfegueWeb: https://www.worldcocoafoundation.org/experts/virginie-crescence-mfegue/ Ruramiso MashumbaWeb: https://globalfarmernetwork.org/author/rmashumba/ Twitter: @RuramisoM Pacifique NshimiyimanaWeb: https://www.facebook.com/realgreengold/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
In a 24/7 news environment, stories sometimes get the facts wrong. But normally, these lapses are not intentional. But recently, there has been an explosion in false, inaccurate, and harmful stories that are made with the sole purpose of convincing the public that a different reality exists. It’s known as fake news and on this week’s show, we’re going to explore its nature, how to diagnose it, and also how not to be fooled by it.      Our first guest is Amber Day, a professor at Bryant University. She reveals that fake news has a base in satire and parody although it has devolved into something more troubling. We learn about how the goals have evolved from bringing humour to bringing trust. What makes fake news so difficult is that many of the tactics used mimic tried and true modes of satire and parody such that we may be unable to judge between what is and what is not real. Because fake news is hard to identify, our next guest has developed software that can detect different types of fake news. Her name is Victoria Rubin and she is an associate professor at the University of Western Ontario. She has developed the LiT.RL news verification browser that can identify fake news and highlights it so you are informed before you click. We discuss how this browser was developed and how accurate it is compared to the human eye. In our SASS Class, we learn about one of the main reasons people fall for fake news. Our guest teacher is Gordon Pennycook and he an assistant professor at the University of Saskatchewan. He has tried to understand why people tend to believe these falsified stories and has come up with a rather unexpected result. While partisan beliefs do play a role, the most important factor is one we can all appreciate. It’s laziness.If you enjoy The Super Awesome Science Show, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts and be sure to tell a friend about the show. Thanks to you, we won the Canadian Podcast Award for Outstanding Science and Medicine Series. Let’s keep the awesome momentum going together!  Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: Amber DayWeb: https://departments.bryant.edu/english-and-cultural-studies/faculty/day-amber Victoria Rubin Web: https://victoriarubin.fims.uwo.ca/ Twitter: @vVctoriaRubinLiT.RL Browser: https://victoriarubin.fims.uwo.ca/2018/12/19/release-for-the-lit-rl-news-verification-browser-detecting-clickbait-satire-and-falsified-news/ Gordon PennycookWeb: https://www.uregina.ca/arts/psychology/faculty-staff/faculty/pennycook%20gordon.html Twitter: @GordPennycookSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
We tend to believe that morality is knowing the difference between right and wrong. But it's so much more. It's the basis for how we live, because each of us has a unique sense of morality. This week, we look at how morality is developed in children and how we can ensure they become moral adults. Our guest for the entire episode is Melanie Killen. She's a professor of human development and quantitative methodology and the associate director for the Center for Children, Relationships, and Culture at the University of Maryland. She's been studying morality for decades and has shared her knowledge in academic papers, books, and even network television. But what's the origin of morality? There’s no set age but it is thought to have a few phases. One happens to be the terrible twos. While we may think children are simply acting out to get attention, we find out that they are attempting to develop their own sense of self along with their morality. We also explore another notable phase, the teenage rebel. This time is necessary for a child to develop their own independence and start the path to adulthood. We then explore the process of developing morality in children. We know authority is an important part of this growing process. However, our interactions with our peers drives how those lessons are absorbed and eventually used in our own sense of morality. From bargaining and compromise to threats and bribes, children identify what they believe is not just right and wrong, but also fair and just. Depending on how these interactions occur, morality may become inclusive or exclusive, leading to prejudice and discrimination later in life.   In our SASS Class, we learn how to help develop good morality in children through Killen’s project known as Developing Inclusive Youth. It’s a program that allows children to witness various social inequalities and then provides them the opportunity to talk about their viewpoints based on personal experience. The goal is to give children a chance to develop morality as a part of society and the results have shown to be quite positive. Contact: Twitter: @JATetroEmail: thegermguy@gmail.com Guests: Melanie KillenWeb: www.killenlab.umd.eduSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
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Podcast Details

Created by
Curiouscast
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Nov 30th, 2020
Latest Episode
Nov 30th, 2020
Release Period
Weekly
Episodes
73
Avg. Episode Length
29 minutes
Explicit
No
Order
Episodic
Language
English

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