The John Batchelor Show

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Photo:1904Supreme Court Room in the Capitol  http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShowNominate and confirm before the Election. @LizPeek
Photo:1944 New York, New York. A crowd watching the news line on the Times building at Times Square http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShowThe roaring economy of February 2020 kept America from falling into collapse.  @LizPeek
Image:   St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, Main Street, Westphalia, Osage County, MOFather Robert Sirico, Acton Institute; and pastor in Grand Rapids, in re:  Two practicing Roman Catholics, one of whom will be nominated to the Supreme Court. “Dogma” simply means teachings.  “Orthodox” means right teaching. Pelosi’s blame was for actually believing the teachings of the Church. Roman Catholics and Quakers have been the object of [reservati0ns] for centuries.  . . .  An egregious aspect of this is that the Jewish member of the Senate should so severely question the faith of a nominee.    The question for JFK was, do you believe in the [absolute] power of a foreign potentate, i.e., the Pope?  The Reverend Robert A Sirico.  ..  ..  ..    Father Robert A. Sirico was ordained a priest in 1989 and received his Master of Divinity degree from the Catholic University of America, following undergraduate study at the University of Southern California and the University of London. During his studies and early ministry, he experienced a growing concern over the lack of training religious studies students receive in fundamental economic principles, leaving them poorly equipped to understand and address today's social problems. As a result of these concerns, Fr. Sirico co-founded the Acton Institute with Kris Alan Mauren in 1990. He was appointed pastor of Sacred Heart in 2013 and has served in a variety of pastoral positions both in Michigan and elsewhere. His writings on religious, political, economic, and social matters are published in a variety of journals, including: the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, the London Financial Times, the Washington Times, the Detroit News, and National Review. Fr. Sirico is often called upon by members of the broadcast media for statements regarding economics, civil rights, and issues of religious concern, and has provided commentary for CNN, ABC, the BBC, NPR, and CBS' 60 Minutes, among others. In April of 1999, Fr. Sirico was awarded an honorary doctorate in Christian Ethics from the Franciscan University of Steubenville, and in May of 2001, Universidad Francisco Marroquin awarded him an honorary doctorate in Social Sciences. He is a member of the prestigious Mont Pèlerin Society, the American Academy of Religion, and the Philadelphia Society, and is on the Board of Advisors of the Civic Institute in Prague. Father Sirico also served on the Michigan Civil Rights Commission from 1994 to 1998. His pastoral ministry has included a chaplaincy to AIDS patients at the National Institutes of Health. Fr. Sirico is a native of Brooklyn, New York. https://www.sacredheartgr.org/staff-members/fr-robert-sirico/
Image:  P. & O. India-China-Australia Mail and Passenger Services.  S.S. Mongolia Gregory R Copley, Defense and Foreign Affairs, and The New Total War of the Twenty-first Century and the Trigger of the Fear Pandemic; in re:  The Indian military, frustrated by China’s aggression along the Line of Actual Control (high in the Himalaya where even breathing is difficult) and the deaths of officers at the hands of Chinese: enraged, and no longer just digging in and staving off Chinese, but now are set on liberating Tibet. Constraints on the practical aspects of this.  This is not just the Roof of the World, but the high spot whence the waters of all the main rivers of Asia. Tibet is critical to the survival of the PRC or any PRC government. The Indus Valley is the lifeline of Pakistan. This is an existential battle.  Pushing from Ladakh would be difficult right now: troops through a narrow pass to get to the region; very difficult.  My Indian sources are concerned that China may undertake an act of aggression before the US election.        China isn’t interested in a deal; just wants territory, India isn't interested, either, after what it did in Kashmir.  Rather, India is taking a route to the West of Ladakh into Pakistani-held Kashmir.   https://www.indiatoday.in/news-analysis/story/india-china-faceoff-worst-case-scenario-becoming-new-normal-in-eastern-ladakh-1724270-2020-09-22  
Image: Senate ofc. bldg.Bruce Thornton, David Horowitz Freedom Center, and Hoover, in re:  The Senate was given more power with the idea that it was constituted of people with more experience.          Key Largo:  gangster explains to Bogart how you hold elections in a 1930’s election: you keep counting till you get the result you want.  Murkowski and Collins.  Pelosi is threatening impeachment of the president to slow down the process.  Senate could wait, or could ignore the whole thing.   https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/2020/09/dont-go-wobbly-senate-republicans-bruce-thornton/?utm_source=Hoover+Daily+Report&utm_campaign=47ea3a97e7-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_09_21_06_51&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_21b1edff3c-47ea3a97e7-72527561
Image: California gardenBill McGurn, @wjmcgurn, WSJ editorial page and Main Street column; in re:  Discrimination.  The whole state of California is weighing the possibility that it’s OK with discrimination. Ward Connolly: a ban on race preferences in the State constitution. Proposition 16 is designed to remove that.  It got on the ballot easily, but a poll says about half of Californians oppose it.  Asian-Americans seem to be a focus of it. Median income of Asian-American families is $100,000?   The school system is scandalous. Let's also return to SATs.  Baffling to repeal language that bans discrimination.  LA Times article.    https://www.wsj.com/articles/an-anti-asian-proposition-11600729855
Photo: 1908 Washing copper ore at the mines in Corrocoro, Bolivia  http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShowNarco-terrorist fugitive Evo Morales presses to recapture  Bolivia at the poll. @jmhumire, @MariaFdaCabal https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/09/18/bolivian-interim-president-anez-withdraws-from-election-race/ 
Photo: Theodore Roosevelt standing among ships in harbor and digging and throwing dirt in direction of "Bogota," while small man on hill raises flag "new treaty." Probably in reference to Hay-Herran canal treaty of 1903.(DLC/PP-1932:0042).Forms part of: Cabinet of American illustration (Library of Congress).Published in: A World worthwhile.  New York : Harper & Bros., 1922, p. 164.Exhibit loan 4185-L.Exhibit loan 4408-L: The World of Teddy Roosevelt, Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, NY, 2002-2003. http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShowStateSec Pompeo bolsters Colombia's Duque in the struggle with rogue state Venezuela. @jmhumire, @MariaFdaCabal https://www.infobae.com/america/colombia/2020/09/19/mike-pompeo-visita-a-ivan-duque-con-el-foco-puesto-en-la-seguridad-regional-el-narcotrafico-y-la-crisis-en-venezuela/
Photo:1901 [England - London - Bank of England]  http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShowBoris Johnson orders a second lockdown in the UK. @JosephSternberg WSJOpinionhttps://www.ft.com/content/a714ac9d-7ab3-47d9-910d-ecc00acf1cf6
Photo:Entrance to St. Paul's London  http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShowBrexit deadline looms despite the virus and lockdown. @JosephSternberg @WSJOpinionhttps://www.ft.com/content/75e3b3aa-757a-4ad2-968d-103354a7d3e3
Image: Macbeth with Lady MacbethThe Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606,by James Shapiro  The preeminent Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro shows how the tumultuous events in 1606 influenced three of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies written that year: King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. “The Year of Lear is irresistible—a banquet of wisdom” (The New York Times Book Review). In the years leading up to 1606, Shakespeare’s great productivity had ebbed. But that year, at age forty-two, he found his footing again, finishing a play he had begun the previous autumn, King Lear, then writing two other great tragedies, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. It was a memorable year in England as well—a terrorist plot conceived by a small group of Catholic gentry had been uncovered at the last hour. The foiled Gunpowder Plot would have blown up the king and royal family along with the nation’s political and religious leadership. The aborted plot renewed anti-Catholic sentiment and laid bare divisions in the kingdom. It was against this background that Shakespeare finished Lear, a play about a divided kingdom, then wrote a tragedy that turned on the murder of a Scottish king, Macbeth. He ended this astonishing year with a third masterpiece no less steeped in current events and concerns: Antony and Cleopatra. “Exciting and sometimes revelatory, in The Year of Lear, James Shapiro takes a closer look at the political and social turmoil that contributed to the creation of three supreme masterpieces” (The Washington Post). He places them in the context of their times, while also allowing us greater insight into how Shakespeare was personally touched by such events as a terrible outbreak of plague and growing religious divisions. “His great gift is to make the plays seem at once more comprehensible and more staggering” (The New York Review of Books). For anyone interested in Shakespeare, this is an indispensable book.   https://www.amazon.com/Year-Lear-Shakespeare-1606/dp/1416541659
Image: The Historie of King Lear, by William Shakespeare (1564-1616)The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606,by James Shapiro  The preeminent Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro shows how the tumultuous events in 1606 influenced three of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies written that year: King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. “The Year of Lear is irresistible—a banquet of wisdom” (The New York Times Book Review). In the years leading up to 1606, Shakespeare’s great productivity had ebbed. But that year, at age forty-two, he found his footing again, finishing a play he had begun the previous autumn, King Lear, then writing two other great tragedies, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. It was a memorable year in England as well—a terrorist plot conceived by a small group of Catholic gentry had been uncovered at the last hour. The foiled Gunpowder Plot would have blown up the king and royal family along with the nation’s political and religious leadership. The aborted plot renewed anti-Catholic sentiment and laid bare divisions in the kingdom. It was against this background that Shakespeare finished Lear, a play about a divided kingdom, then wrote a tragedy that turned on the murder of a Scottish king, Macbeth. He ended this astonishing year with a third masterpiece no less steeped in current events and concerns: Antony and Cleopatra. “Exciting and sometimes revelatory, in The Year of Lear, James Shapiro takes a closer look at the political and social turmoil that contributed to the creation of three supreme masterpieces” (The Washington Post). He places them in the context of their times, while also allowing us greater insight into how Shakespeare was personally touched by such events as a terrible outbreak of plague and growing religious divisions. “His great gift is to make the plays seem at once more comprehensible and more staggering” (The New York Review of Books). For anyone interested in Shakespeare, this is an indispensable book.   https://www.amazon.com/Year-Lear-Shakespeare-1606/dp/1416541659
Image: Gunpowder PlotThe Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606,by James Shapiro  The preeminent Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro shows how the tumultuous events in 1606 influenced three of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies written that year: King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. “The Year of Lear is irresistible—a banquet of wisdom” (The New York Times Book Review). In the years leading up to 1606, Shakespeare’s great productivity had ebbed. But that year, at age forty-two, he found his footing again, finishing a play he had begun the previous autumn, King Lear, then writing two other great tragedies, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. It was a memorable year in England as well—a terrorist plot conceived by a small group of Catholic gentry had been uncovered at the last hour. The foiled Gunpowder Plot would have blown up the king and royal family along with the nation’s political and religious leadership. The aborted plot renewed anti-Catholic sentiment and laid bare divisions in the kingdom. It was against this background that Shakespeare finished Lear, a play about a divided kingdom, then wrote a tragedy that turned on the murder of a Scottish king, Macbeth. He ended this astonishing year with a third masterpiece no less steeped in current events and concerns: Antony and Cleopatra. “Exciting and sometimes revelatory, in The Year of Lear, James Shapiro takes a closer look at the political and social turmoil that contributed to the creation of three supreme masterpieces” (The Washington Post). He places them in the context of their times, while also allowing us greater insight into how Shakespeare was personally touched by such events as a terrible outbreak of plague and growing religious divisions. “His great gift is to make the plays seem at once more comprehensible and more staggering” (The New York Review of Books). For anyone interested in Shakespeare, this is an indispensable book.   https://www.amazon.com/Year-Lear-Shakespeare-1606/dp/1416541659
Image: William ShakespeareThe Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606,by James Shapiro  The preeminent Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro shows how the tumultuous events in 1606 influenced three of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies written that year: King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. “The Year of Lear is irresistible—a banquet of wisdom” (The New York Times Book Review). In the years leading up to 1606, Shakespeare’s great productivity had ebbed. But that year, at age forty-two, he found his footing again, finishing a play he had begun the previous autumn, King Lear, then writing two other great tragedies, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. It was a memorable year in England as well—a terrorist plot conceived by a small group of Catholic gentry had been uncovered at the last hour. The foiled Gunpowder Plot would have blown up the king and royal family along with the nation’s political and religious leadership. The aborted plot renewed anti-Catholic sentiment and laid bare divisions in the kingdom. It was against this background that Shakespeare finished Lear, a play about a divided kingdom, then wrote a tragedy that turned on the murder of a Scottish king, Macbeth. He ended this astonishing year with a third masterpiece no less steeped in current events and concerns: Antony and Cleopatra. “Exciting and sometimes revelatory, in The Year of Lear, James Shapiro takes a closer look at the political and social turmoil that contributed to the creation of three supreme masterpieces” (The Washington Post). He places them in the context of their times, while also allowing us greater insight into how Shakespeare was personally touched by such events as a terrible outbreak of plague and growing religious divisions. “His great gift is to make the plays seem at once more comprehensible and more staggering” (The New York Review of Books). For anyone interested in Shakespeare, this is an indispensable book.   https://www.amazon.com/Year-Lear-Shakespeare-1606/dp/1416541659
Image:  Second Globe Theatre, detail from Hollar's View of London, 1647. Hollar sketched the building from life, but only later assembled the drawings into this View; he mislabelled his images of The Globe and the nearby bear-baiting enclosure. Here, the correct label has been restored. The small building to the left supplied food- and ale-sellers at the theatreThe Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606,by James Shapiro  The preeminent Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro shows how the tumultuous events in 1606 influenced three of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies written that year: King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. “The Year of Lear is irresistible—a banquet of wisdom” (The New York Times Book Review). In the years leading up to 1606, Shakespeare’s great productivity had ebbed. But that year, at age forty-two, he found his footing again, finishing a play he had begun the previous autumn, King Lear, then writing two other great tragedies, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. It was a memorable year in England as well—a terrorist plot conceived by a small group of Catholic gentry had been uncovered at the last hour. The foiled Gunpowder Plot would have blown up the king and royal family along with the nation’s political and religious leadership. The aborted plot renewed anti-Catholic sentiment and laid bare divisions in the kingdom. It was against this background that Shakespeare finished Lear, a play about a divided kingdom, then wrote a tragedy that turned on the murder of a Scottish king, Macbeth. He ended this astonishing year with a third masterpiece no less steeped in current events and concerns: Antony and Cleopatra. “Exciting and sometimes revelatory, in The Year of Lear, James Shapiro takes a closer look at the political and social turmoil that contributed to the creation of three supreme masterpieces” (The Washington Post). He places them in the context of their times, while also allowing us greater insight into how Shakespeare was personally touched by such events as a terrible outbreak of plague and growing religious divisions. “His great gift is to make the plays seem at once more comprehensible and more staggering” (The New York Review of Books). For anyone interested in Shakespeare, this is an indispensable book.   https://www.amazon.com/Year-Lear-Shakespeare-1606/dp/1416541659
Image: Virginia in 1606.  Composite plate of reproductions of engravings featuring: John Smith, James I, Pocahontas, Capt. Newport, Bacon and Berkeley, Delaware, and Sandys.The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606,by James Shapiro  The preeminent Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro shows how the tumultuous events in 1606 influenced three of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies written that year: King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. “The Year of Lear is irresistible—a banquet of wisdom” (The New York Times Book Review). In the years leading up to 1606, Shakespeare’s great productivity had ebbed. But that year, at age forty-two, he found his footing again, finishing a play he had begun the previous autumn, King Lear, then writing two other great tragedies, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. It was a memorable year in England as well—a terrorist plot conceived by a small group of Catholic gentry had been uncovered at the last hour. The foiled Gunpowder Plot would have blown up the king and royal family along with the nation’s political and religious leadership. The aborted plot renewed anti-Catholic sentiment and laid bare divisions in the kingdom. It was against this background that Shakespeare finished Lear, a play about a divided kingdom, then wrote a tragedy that turned on the murder of a Scottish king, Macbeth. He ended this astonishing year with a third masterpiece no less steeped in current events and concerns: Antony and Cleopatra. “Exciting and sometimes revelatory, in The Year of Lear, James Shapiro takes a closer look at the political and social turmoil that contributed to the creation of three supreme masterpieces” (The Washington Post). He places them in the context of their times, while also allowing us greater insight into how Shakespeare was personally touched by such events as a terrible outbreak of plague and growing religious divisions. “His great gift is to make the plays seem at once more comprehensible and more staggering” (The New York Review of Books). For anyone interested in Shakespeare, this is an indispensable book.   https://www.amazon.com/Year-Lear-Shakespeare-1606/dp/1416541659
Image: The city of Amsterdam in 1606. The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606,by James Shapiro  The preeminent Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro shows how the tumultuous events in 1606 influenced three of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies written that year: King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. “The Year of Lear is irresistible—a banquet of wisdom” (The New York Times Book Review). In the years leading up to 1606, Shakespeare’s great productivity had ebbed. But that year, at age forty-two, he found his footing again, finishing a play he had begun the previous autumn, King Lear, then writing two other great tragedies, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. It was a memorable year in England as well—a terrorist plot conceived by a small group of Catholic gentry had been uncovered at the last hour. The foiled Gunpowder Plot would have blown up the king and royal family along with the nation’s political and religious leadership. The aborted plot renewed anti-Catholic sentiment and laid bare divisions in the kingdom. It was against this background that Shakespeare finished Lear, a play about a divided kingdom, then wrote a tragedy that turned on the murder of a Scottish king, Macbeth. He ended this astonishing year with a third masterpiece no less steeped in current events and concerns: Antony and Cleopatra. “Exciting and sometimes revelatory, in The Year of Lear, James Shapiro takes a closer look at the political and social turmoil that contributed to the creation of three supreme masterpieces” (The Washington Post). He places them in the context of their times, while also allowing us greater insight into how Shakespeare was personally touched by such events as a terrible outbreak of plague and growing religious divisions. “His great gift is to make the plays seem at once more comprehensible and more staggering” (The New York Review of Books). For anyone interested in Shakespeare, this is an indispensable book.   https://www.amazon.com/Year-Lear-Shakespeare-1606/dp/1416541659
Image: Book coverThe Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606,by James Shapiro  The preeminent Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro shows how the tumultuous events in 1606 influenced three of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies written that year: King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. “The Year of Lear is irresistible—a banquet of wisdom” (The New York Times Book Review). In the years leading up to 1606, Shakespeare’s great productivity had ebbed. But that year, at age forty-two, he found his footing again, finishing a play he had begun the previous autumn, King Lear, then writing two other great tragedies, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. It was a memorable year in England as well—a terrorist plot conceived by a small group of Catholic gentry had been uncovered at the last hour. The foiled Gunpowder Plot would have blown up the king and royal family along with the nation’s political and religious leadership. The aborted plot renewed anti-Catholic sentiment and laid bare divisions in the kingdom. It was against this background that Shakespeare finished Lear, a play about a divided kingdom, then wrote a tragedy that turned on the murder of a Scottish king, Macbeth. He ended this astonishing year with a third masterpiece no less steeped in current events and concerns: Antony and Cleopatra. “Exciting and sometimes revelatory, in The Year of Lear, James Shapiro takes a closer look at the political and social turmoil that contributed to the creation of three supreme masterpieces” (The Washington Post). He places them in the context of their times, while also allowing us greater insight into how Shakespeare was personally touched by such events as a terrible outbreak of plague and growing religious divisions. “His great gift is to make the plays seem at once more comprehensible and more staggering” (The New York Review of Books). For anyone interested in Shakespeare, this is an indispensable book.   https://www.amazon.com/Year-Lear-Shakespeare-1606/dp/1416541659
Photo:This untitled illustration by cartoonist Clifford Berryman, which appeared in the Washington Post on November 8, 1905, depicts William Randolph Hearst, who ran for mayor of New York in the 1905 election, sitting at his desk while being taunted by the Tammany Tiger as election results came in showing powerful Tammany-backed candidate George B. McClellan Jr. to be the winner.Berryman Political Cartoon Collection http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShowGOP conservative base would be content with either Barrett or Lagoa. @AndrewCMcCarthy @NRO @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatnesshttps://www.nationalreview.com/2020/08/history-is-on-the-side-of-republicans-filling-a-supreme-court-vacancy-in-2020/?utm_source=recirc-desktop&utm_medium=article&utm_campaign=right-rail&utm_content=top-stories&utm_term=first 
Photo:1888Illus. in: Harper's Weekly, v. 32, (1888 June 28), p. 61.Wood engraving after Carl Becter.Title and other information transcribed from caption card. http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShowDemocrat court-packing is more radical than anything the GOP proposes.  @AndrewCMcCarthy @NRO @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatnesshttps://www.nationalreview.com/2020/09/replacing-justice-ginsburg-politics-not-precedent/
Photo:1979Armed men crouching behind sandbag barricade in street, Tehran, Iran.Title from photographer. http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShowThe UN Security Council ignores the Islamic Republic of Iran's suspect nuclear weapons program and all other violations of arms sanctions. US says all UN sanctions on Iran restored, but world yawnshttps://apnews.com/8fe3bff342135cb4817629499e59964a
Photo:1750 InkwellMade in Mexico http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contacthttp://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedulesParler & Twitter: @BatchelorShow"Indiana" Hoenlein and the Lost Inkwell of the Second Temple Period. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatness Second Temple Era Inkwell Discovered in Gush Etzionhttps://www.newsbreak.com/news/2063650044795/second-temple-era-inkwell-discovered-in-gush-etzion
Image:  "The Thief Falls Through the Skylight in the Bedroom", Folio from a Kalila wa Dimna Rick Fisher, Intl Assessment and Strategy Center, and Gordon Chang, Daily Beast, in re: Shenzhen Zhenhua Data Technology, a so-called private corporation in China, gathers data, incl in the US: esp military targets.  Hoovers up vast amounts of data, share it with Chinese govt and military. Providing data to Ministry of State Security or PLA, or the like.  Aerospace, automotive, energy: all industries in which to gather data and target enemies.   (https://www.foxnews.com/world/chinese-tech-company-collects-data-of-prominent-americans-and-military-social-media-posts) and the TikTok deal.
Image:  Arrest of criminals in old China Michael Yon, East Asia correspondent, and Gordon Chang, Daily Beast, in re: PRC arrests and detains without habeas corpus.  https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/china-confirms-12-hong-kong-activists-detained-jw956gshs 
Image:  During a search and destroy mission members of a US Navy (USN) Seal Team discover a large cache of Al Qaeda and Taliban forces munitions in a cave in the Zhawar Kili area of Eastern Afghanistan. USN Special Operations Forces (SOF) are conducting missions in Afghanistan in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM Tom Joscelyn, Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies; & Senior Editor for FDD's Long War Journal; and Bill Roggio, Long War Journal and FDD; in re:   Al Qaeda is not on the road to defeat.
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Podcast Details

Created by
Audioboom
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Mar 15th, 2017
Latest Episode
Sep 23rd, 2020
Release Period
Daily
Seasons
#4
Episodes
11181
Avg. Episode Length
13 minutes
Explicit
No
Order
Episodic

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