The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish Podcast

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

A Business, Education and Investing podcast featuring Shane Parrish
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#18 Naval Ravikant: The  Angel Philosopher
Naval Ravikant is the CEO and co-founder of AngelList. He’s invested in more than 100 companies, including Uber, Twitter, Yammer, and many others. It’s difficult to nail down exactly what we discuss in our conversation because I had so many questions to ask him. Naval is an incredibly deep thinker who challenges the status quo on so many things. This is an interview you’ll want to listen to, think a bit, and then listen to again. Here are just a few of the many things we cover in this episode: What a “typical day” looks like (not the answer I expected, and not one you’ve likely heard before) How Naval developed his legendary reading habits and how he finds time to read no matter how busy life gets How the internet has impacted book reading (both good and bad) and how to make sure you’re getting the best information from the most reliable sources What popular habit advice Naval thinks is BS and why Naval’s habit stacking technique that helped him overcome a desire for alcohol and other potentially destructive habits How Naval’s core values give direction to his life and how those values developed over time Naval’s thoughts on the current education system and what we can do to facilitate better learning for our children Naval’s favorite mental models for making critical high-stakes decisions His brilliant two-factor calendar authentication concept to keep him focused on only the most important projects Naval’s definition for the meaning of life (buckle up for this one) His amazing response to the investor who wanted to be just like Steve Jobs And so, so much more. Just a heads up, this is the longest podcast I’ve ever done. While it felt like only thirty minutes, our conversation lasted over two hours! And although it is the longest, it’s also our most downloaded episode on the Knowledge Project, so make sure you have a pen and paper handy. There’s a lot of wisdom up for grabs here. Enjoy this amazing conversation. *** Follow FS on Twitter (https://twitter.com/farnamstreet) For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://www.fs.blog/podcast/ Upgrade your thinking with my free weekly email digest. Don't miss out, sign up at https://www.fs.blog/newsletter/
#19 Rory Sutherland: The Psychology of Advertising
In this info-packed and entertaining interview, Rory Sutherland, Vice Chairman of Ogilvy & Mather, and I dive deep on advertising, persuasion, and why humans do some of the silly things we do.
#50 Josh Wolfe: Inventing the Future
Josh Wolfe, co-founder of Lux Capital discusses how to unearth the unexplored ideas that will reshape our future. We also talk parenting, decision making, and which generation has the best rap. --- For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet on Twitter for mind-expanding content. 
#68 Daniel Kahneman: Putting Your Intuition on Ice
Psychologist and Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman shines light on the biases that cripple our decision-making, hamstring negotiations, and damper our thinking, and shares what limited actions we can take to combat their effects.  --- For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet on Twitter for mind-expanding content. 
#48 Adam Robinson: Winning at the Great Game (Part 2)
Author, educator, and hedge fund advisor, Adam Robinson returns for part 2 of our fascinating discussion. We talk chess, AI, handicapping horse races, and the secret to learning that nobody is teaching. --- For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet on Twitter for mind-expanding content. 
#73 Steven Strogatz: Exploring Curiosities
Mathematician Steven Strogatz reveals how math is the key to exploring and understanding the beauty of our world. --- For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet on Twitter for mind-expanding content.
#71 Esther Perel: Cultivating Desire
Relationship expert Esther Perel reveals her favorite strategies for “fighting” fair, rewriting stories that damage relationships, and breathing new life into our romantic partnerships. --- For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet on Twitter for mind-expanding content. 
#27 Chris Voss: The Art of Letting Other People Have Your Way
Negotiation expert Chris Voss teaches a masterclass on the art of negotiation. Chris is the former lead international kidnapping negotiator at the Federal Bureau of Investigation. *** For comprehensive show notes on this episode and more go to https://www.fs.blog/podcast/ Our free weekly email, Brain Food, helps you get better results through intelligent preparation and offers great reading recommendations. Don't miss out, sign up at https://www.fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow Shane on Twitter (https://twitter.com/ShaneAParrish) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FarnamStreet/) to go to bed smarter than you woke up. 
#25 Gary Taubes: Is Sugar Slowly Killing Us
It seems that nowadays, aside from religion and politics, one of the most hotly debated topics is that of nutrition. Should we eat high carb diets? Low carb? High fat? High protein? What about wheat or gluten? Should we eat meat or adopt a vegan diet? There are as many opinions as there are people — and books, magazines and websites are overflowing with information showing you the “right” way to eat and exercise to lose weight. But if “eating less and moving more” is all it takes to lose weight and enjoy a healthy lifestyle, why are so many of us fat and getting fatter? In this episode, I chat with Gary Taubes, bestselling author of three books, The Case Against Sugar (2016), Why We Get Fat and What to Do About It (2011) and Good Calories, Bad Calories (2007). We talk about the sharp rise of obesity and diabetes in America, the structural hurdles to effective nutrition research, and explore the common myth that a calorie is just a calorie. Here are a few other things you’ll learn in this interview: How diets shifted in the last century, and what impact it’s having on our bodies today. Why a carb isn’t just a carb — and why you should know the difference Is the sugar industry the new Big Tobacco? What role genetics play in our health, and how much is under our control Why humans are so attracted to sugar and how to break the habit Gary’s suggestions to improve your health, drop body fat and feel terrific The benefits of fasting and how you can try it out yourself And a bunch more. If you think at all about your health, give this podcast a listen.  *** For comprehensive show notes on this episode and more episodes go to https://www.fs.blog/podcast/ Our free weekly email helps you get better results through intelligent preparation and offers great reading recommendations. Don't miss out, sign up at https://www.fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow Shane on twitter @farnamstreet and Facebook to go to bed smarter than you woke up. 
#69 Stephen Schwarzman: What It Takes
Blackstone CEO Stephen Schwarzman gives advice on attracting and assessing strong talent, making smart decisions, and how to press forward when the chips are down. --- For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet on Twitter for mind-expanding content. 
Santorini Wine with Panayiota Kalogeropoulou
The island of Santorini has not only has breathtaking views but also a fascinating history. Traces of its first inhabitants have been linked back to 4500 BC. In 1613 BC the most powerful volcanic event in the last 10,000 years took place – completely destroying all the islands within a 60 km radius. It has been estimated that 90 billion tons of molten rock was injected into the air, the sea swallowed the volcano, and a massive tsunami swept across the Aegean Sea. Along with the obvious devastation of nature, it is believed that the eruption also sealed the deal for the most civilized nation on the island at the time, the Minoans. Thanks to the thick layer of ash cause by the event, the Bronze Age settlement of Akrotiri was so well preserved that we are able to see how prosperous the area had once been with an elaborate drainage systems, multi-storied buildings, incredible wall paintings, furniture and vessels. The site has as much of a significant importance as does Pompeii. The island’s main volcanic rock, its mineral rich soil, and the amazing climate, has produced some incredibly unique wines. Santorini is known for some of the oldest vineyards in the world. And we know that wine is one of my favourite topics. On today’s podcast I speak with Panayiota Kalogeropoulou about Santorini’s wines. Panayiota is the Director at the Domaine Sigalas vineyard. Paris Sigalas, a mathematician with a goal to make his Santorini vineyard a world heritage site, focuses on grapes that thrive in Santorini (these include the Aidani, Athiri, Plantana – and the prime Greek grape Assyrtiko).
Aristotle Koskinas on Greek History
This is one of 2 interviews that I conducted while visiting Greece this summer. Greek history is deep routed in many things as philosophy, democracy and culture and has laid the foundation of so much of what we know and how we live today. Today I speak with Aristotle Koskinas (@aristotlekoskin), a guide with Athens walking tours. He's one of the best guides you can find in Athens. In order to be a guide in Greece, an individual must complete a 2½ year program at the School of Tourist Guides in Greece - which is a state school under the Ministry of Development. Some of the courses in the curriculum include Ancient Greek history, Byzantine history, Prehistoric Archaeology, Mythology, Geology, history of Theater –and psychology of the tourist. Listen in for details on the history of Athens over the past 3000 years, the influence Greek culture has had across the world, and some insight on what surprises him meeting visitors from different countries.
#36 William MacAskill: The Science of Doing Good
On this episode of The Knowledge Project, I’m happy to have William MacAskill. William is the co-founder and President of the Centre for Effective Altruism (CEA) and an Associate Professor in Philosophy at Oxford University. He is also the founder and president of 80,000 Hours, the co-founder and vice-president of Giving What We Can, and the author of Doing Good Better: Effective Altruism and a Radical New Way to Make a Difference. William’s work is primarily focused on encouraging people to use reason and evidence to find the best possible ways they can use their resources to make the biggest possible impact in the world. We cover a lot of ground in this interview, including: Why good intentions aren’t enough when giving to charity and how we can do better How William's giving philosophy was formed and how it developed into The Centre for Effective Altruism The best metrics to assess how good a charity is before donating a dime How letting our emotions guide our charitable giving can lead to ineffective, and sometimes harmful outcomes. How many charities today unknowingly reward low dollar donors and sell themselves short millions of dollars in potential donations A powerful thought exercise to help you gain a different but valuable perspective about helping the poor and suffering in the world The one cognitive bias William believes is the most damaging to any business, organization or individual William’s foundational values that guide his day to day decisions and actions William’s take on “radical honesty” and when honesty can be taken too far and is no longer constructive William’s definition of success and the imaginary conversation he has with himself on his deathbed to make sure he’s on the right track (this is awesome) The most common mistake William sees people make over and over (and the embarrassingly simple way to avoid making it) And then to wrap up, I gave him a softball question: What is the purpose and meaning of life? If you’ve wanted to make more of a positive impact in the world around you, this insightful interview will give you plenty to think about. Your resources are precious and should be optimized to improve the lives of those you help. I don’t know of a better person to guide you than William. *** For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Upgrade your thinking with my free weekly email digest. Don't miss out, sign up at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/farnamstreet)  
#23 Ray Dalio: Life Lessons from a Self-Made Billionaire
Are you in love with your own ideas regardless of how good they are Would you like to make better decisions and fewer mistakes? Would you like to improve the most important relationships in your life? These are just some of the topics I discuss with my guest, Ray Dalio. Ray Dalio is the founder of the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, and is the author of the new book Principles: Life and Work. He is also a leading figure in the world of philanthropy, is an avid supporter of transcendental meditation, and has appeared on Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people in the world. Ray gave me over an hour and a half of his time, and I didn’t waste a minute of it.  *** For comprehensive show notes on this episode go to https://fs.blog/ray-dalio/ For more episodes go to https://fs.blog/the-knowledge-project/ Our free weekly email helps you get better results through intelligent preparation and offers great reading recommendations. Don't miss out, sign up at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow Shane on twitter @farnamstreet and facebook to go to bed smarter than you woke up. 
#22 Adam Grant: Givers, Takers, and the Resilient Mind
Are you a giver or a taker? Have you ever struggled to find work/life balance? How do you build resilience in yourself, your team, or your children? I tackle these topics and many more in this interview with my special guest, Adam Grant. In this interview, we cover a lot, including: How to tell if you are a giver or a taker (Spoiler: if you just told yourself you’re a giver, you might be in for a rude awakening) How Adam filters down hundreds of ideas and opportunities to the select few he focuses on How to tell if your business idea is a winner or a huge waste of time Why “quick to start and slow to finish” is great advice for budding entrepreneurs How to nurture creativity and resilience in your children (or team culture) How to create positive competitive environments that bring out the best in people Adam’s two core family values and how he instills them in his children “Mental time travel” and how it can make you resilient to any challenge or obstacle Why “how can I be more productive” is the wrong question to ask (and what to ask instead) How Adam and I each address the topic of work/life balance And so much more. *** For comprehensive show notes on this episode go to https://fs.blog/adam-grant/ For more episodes go to https://fs.blog/the-knowledge-project/ Our free weekly email helps you get better results through intelligent preparation and offers great reading recommendations. Don't miss out, sign up at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow FS on twitter @farnamstreet and Facebook to go to bed smarter than you woke up. 
#43 Jennifer Garvey Berger: The Mental Habits of Effective Leaders
In a world that changes at a dizzying rate, effective leaders need to develop the skills to keep up. Developmental coach and author Jennifer Garvey Berger shares 3 habits to ensure continual growth, accelerated learning and deepened relationships of trust. *** In this fast-paced digital economy, it’s impossible to see the changes that are on the horizon. That makes it difficult for leaders to prepare for what’s ahead. In her best-selling books, Changing on the Job, and Simple Habits for Complex Times, author and developmental coach Jennifer Garvey Berger teaches the skills and habits you can adopt today to make you more agile and adaptable to any scenario. During our discussion, we explore some of the methods Jennifer uses to help individuals become better listeners, better learners, and better leaders. There was so much wisdom in this interview that it was difficult to decide what excerpts to share. Here’s a small sampling of what you can expect: — So much of leadership ability is about how other people experience themselves in your presence. A great leader has a presence that makes other people bigger. History is filled with leaders, who were told in whispers that there was disaster ahead and who were so certain about their own perspective that they marched into disaster headlong. A curious leader listens to whispers and begins to make sense of them, not necessarily to believe them all, but to know that there's something going on to be attuned to. We have the possibility to always be growing. That's a glorious thing. For some people, they're into arrival.   One of the different questions adult development theory lets us ask is, "Who am I being right now and is that the person I want to be?" You bring that question into your everyday life and it moves you.   Over time, as we begin to ask different questions, they push out our thinking and feeling and experiencing because so much of what we're doing is the answer to a question. What you wear is the answer to, "What shall I wear today?" Our lives are living out answers to questions we don't notice that we're asking. Asking different questions helps us lead different lives.   Taking seriously the possibility that somebody else is right and you're wrong requires a mental yoga that you have to remember to do because what your system is going to deliver to you for free from most of our development is when somebody says something that you think is wrong, you just think, "Well, that's wrong." You don't think, "Oh, what am I missing?"   We tend to be looking for the root cause of something, but in complexity, there's no root cause. There's no root cause of a hurricane, right? There's no root cause of a tsunami. There's no root cause in nature. There are just many forces that interact together to get you a particular effect. Similarly, there's no root cause of trust. There's no root cause of leadership. These are all a series of things that happen together. You can't tell the difference in a brain scan between somebody having an opinion and somebody remembering a fact. Our brains think they're the same. So, we have to get really careful with what we think is an opinion and what we think is a fact.   One of the things I love about complexity is it can change from anywhere, right? You can change a system from anywhere. You don't actually need positional power. So, somebody who's locked in one of those patterns could begin to imagine ways to shift even if I'm just shifting my part of the pattern. What if I decided that the talk I'm going to do outside of meetings is going to be all praise for one another? How does that shift the system around me?   I am continually surprised by the power of genuine listening. I know it sounds fairly simple, but people who are led by their curiosity and who genuinely listen to the perspectives of others, they learn like crazy. Listen and Learn. --- For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet on Twitter for mind-expanding content.   
#45 Dan Kluger:  Taking Time to Get It Right
Dan Kluger, award winning chef and owner of NYC’s Loring Place joins me on the podcast to reveal what really happens behind the scenes of a bustling restaurant, why every detail of your craft matters, and how to create the perfect experience for every guest. --- For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet on Twitter for mind-expanding content. 
#39 Tyler Cowen: Thinking About Thinking
There are only a handful of websites that I read religiously. One of those is MarginalRevolution.com, started by my next guest, Tyler Cowen. Other than hosting one of the most popular economic blogs in the world, Tyler is also an economics professor at George Mason University, a regular New York Times columnist, and the author of over a dozen books, including Average is Over, and The Complacent Class. With such a prolific guest, it’s no wonder that we cover a lot of ground. In this episode, we discuss: How the future of labor will look drastically different than it does today, and what we can do to future-proof our livelihood The pros and cons of virtual reality and the impact it could have on society The fate of newspapers and how information will be more and more “bundled” according to our tastes and preferences Race relations in the world, and how in many ways we’ve taken discouraging steps backwards How we’re losing touch with the physical world, and some of the symptoms that indicate that we could be in for a rough ride What Tyler suggests doing to improve decision making and how important (and rare) that skill will be in the coming years Tyler’s advice to parents about how to foster resilience, tenacity and internal drive in their children Tyler’s “quake books” and the reading process he’s developed over the years that keeps him sharp Why giving books as gifts can be dangerous The one skill every person should possess before Googling anything What playing competitive chess as a child taught Tyler about how he thinks and views the world today And much more, including Tyler’s thoughts on minimum wage, bitcoin, and his favorite television programs. If you want to upgrade your thinking so you’re prepared for the brave new world that’s rapidly developing before our eyes, you won’t want to miss this fascinating episode. For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet for mind-expanding content. 
#8 Julia Galef: The Art of Changing Minds
On this episode of the Knowledge Project, I discuss rationality, changing minds (our own and others), filtering information, and a lot more with Julia Galef.
#9 Maestro Alexander Shelley: The Architecture of Music
In this incredible episode, I’m joined by Maestro Alexander Shelley. We dive deep into the architecture of music, the necessity of arts, and what makes Beethoven’s 5th Symphony is so popular.
#4 Jason Zweig: Elevate Your Financial IQ
WSJ columnist Jason Zweig and I tackle important topics like how to be a smarter investor, filtering out noise, why philosophy and history matters, and his new book, The Devil’s Financial Dictionary.
#3 Sanjay Bakshi: Why Mental Models
In this episode, I chat with professor and value investing genius Sanjay Bakshi about the power of mental models, multidisciplinary thinking, reading, and acquiring worldly wisdom.
#2 Michael Lombardi: Leadership on the Field
New England Patriots Coach Michael Lombardi and I discuss the four aspects of leadership, high stakes decision making, creating a winning culture at work and at home and much more.
#1 Michael Mauboussin: When To Trust Your Gut
Multiple best selling author and financial strategist Michael Mauboussin shares his wisdom on parenting, daily routines, reading, and how to make better decisions.
#51 Celeste Headlee: The Dying Art of Conversation
Speaker, author and radio journalist Celeste Headlee has had decades of experience fine tuning the recipe for engaging and rewarding conversation. She shares some tips to help us instantly improve our conversational skills and meaningfully connect with others. --- For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://fs.blog/podcast/ Is your brain hungry for more? Don't miss out! Sign up for our weekly "Brain Food" at https://fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow @farnamstreet on Twitter for mind-expanding content. 
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Podcast Details
Started
Apr 28th, 2015
Latest Episode
Jan 21st, 2020
Release Period
Weekly
No. of Episodes
75
Avg. Episode Length
About 1 hour
Explicit
No

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