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The director of "Mother!" and "Black Swan" talks about the new VR series, "Spheres," which he produced.
WIRED's editor in chief Nick Thompson talks to Yuval Noah Harari and Tristan Harris about how social platforms expertly manipulate our thinking.
The same tech and gadgets that keep us up at night might also help us get better sleep. Well…maybe.
WIRED writer Tom Simonite explains quantum computing to us. Kinda.
It has 512 GB of storage, a huge battery, Fortnite, and a stylus that doubles as a selfie assist. Samsung has gone all out with the new Galaxy Note 9. Why?
This week, WIRED's product reviews editor Brendan Nystedt joins the show to run down the particulars of the 2018 MacBook Pro.
This week, special guest Nitasha Tiku charts Juul's ever-changing relationship with its consumers, its investors, and those who oppose its product.
Google plans to start publicly testing Duplex, its uncanny robot-phone-calling technology, within the next couple weeks.
On this week's show, Arielle Pardes charts Silicon Valley's growing fascination with technology for enabling women to track their fertility.
"Bikes" Calore makes a case for why everyone should bike more-and tells you the gear you need to do it right.
Google I/O, the company’s annual developer conference, is clearly no longer just about the newest version of Android. This year Google used the keynote stage to show off some of its advancements in artificial intelligence, including a demo of an eerily-human-like robot caller that can call the hair salon or a restaurant and make appointments on your behalf. We also learned more about Google’s vision for the future of visual search, saw glimpses of its new Material Design theme, and, as expected, learned more about Android P. But really, the bot-calling demo was the one that blew everyone away, and also happens to be the thing that is still the most fraught with unanswered questions. Some notes: You can find all of our I/O coverage here, including this exclusive look at the new Google Lens, the questions Google still needs to answer about its Duplex technology, and the history of JOMO (AKA the Joy of Missing Out), as well as the research behind Google’s new features that encourage you to take breaks from technology. Recommendations this week: Arielle recommends the Netflix series “Wild Wild Country,” Lauren suggests the new “Caliphate” podcast from The New York Times, and Mike is all about bike-sharing services this week. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, Lauren Goode is @laurengoode, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
F8, Facebook’s annual developers conference, was earlier this week, so we decided to host this week’s Gadget Lab podcast entirely in VR, which means you’ll need an Oculus Go headset to listen to it as well. Just kidding, but really, that might be the future if Facebook’s vision for social VR comes to fruition. We also heard a lot about Facebook’s plans for a more social Instagram–think live video-chatting with your friends while you browse their vacation photos–and more AR filters. And if you ever happened to think that Facebook creeping on potential dates should just become an Official Thing, Facebook has you covered there: it used the F8 stage to announced a new service called “Dating,” one that lets Facebook users make a separate profile and use a dedicated inbox specifically for that activity. Really, what better way to get to the heart of privacy concerns than by going straight to users’ hearts. But in all seriousness, Facebook’s prowess in technology was on full display this past week, Congressional testimonies be damned. Behind the $200 headset and the dating app and the bunny rabbit AR filters exists a company that is working frantically to not just keep up but actually lead on things like artificial intelligence, machine learning, and advanced optical displays. At the end of the day, Facebook still makes money off of advertising. But for a couple days a year, it gets to pretend its whole reason for existence is to connect the world while playing in a fun R&D sandbox. Some notes: You can find all of our F8 coverage right here, including Steven Levy’s interview with Mark Zuckerberg ahead of the big event; Tom Simonite’s story on how Facebook is using #puppy hashtags on Instagram to feed its computer vision AI; Peter Rubin’s review of Oculus Go; Lauren’s story about Facebook’s need to crack down on VR apps before VR suffers the same issues as the main Facebook platform; and Arielle’s recap of the biggest news from the F8 Day One keynote. Recommendations this week: Michael says run, don’t walk to check out the new Lenovo Mirage Solo virtual reality headset, which at $400 is double the cost of the Oculus Go but also offers a better overall viewing experience (his full review is here); Arielle recommends WIRED staffer Peter Rubin’s new book, Future Presence: How Virtual Reality is Changing Human Connection, Intimacy, and the Limits of Ordinary Life; and Lauren recommends this episode of the Tim Ferriss show, which features WIRED editor-in-chief Nick Thompson (clearly we are very proud of our colleagues). Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, Lauren Goode is @laurengoode, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
Oh Snap: The next generation of Snapchat Spectacles has arrived, and they look a lot like…the first pair of Spectacles. But Snap has made some notable changes to the guts of the glasses, even if they still have that I-just-came-back-from-Coachella aesthetic, so Arielle and I took both the old and the new Spectacles to a theme park and tried them on for size. On this week’s episode we discuss why Snapchat is still committed to making hardware despite an unspectacular first attempt, why Arielle should probably replace Evan Spiegel as Snap’s CEO, and what the ephemerality of photos in 24-hour “stories” will mean for people who someday might want those snaps and grams for posterity. Some notes: You can find all of our Snapchat coverage right here, including Lauren’s first impressions of the new product, a wild roller coaster ride with Spectacles, and Arielle’s piece on why Snap needs Spectacles right now. Also, we’re getting ready to dive into developer conference season, with Facebook, Microsoft, Google, and Apple all hosting their annual conferences in the coming weeks, so get ready for a lot of pod-chats about apps, AI, AR, VR, and privacy issues. Recommendations this week: Sandra, a new podcast from Gimlet Media about an AI of the same name; Janelle Monae’s Dirty Computer, the artist’s latest album (and accompanying short film); this episode of Recode Media with Peter Kafka, in which Peter interviews Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Emily Steel about the story that took down Bill O’Reilly. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, Lauren Goode is @laurengoode, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
Lauren’s new around here, and she wants to get to know Mike and Arielle a little better. So she came up with the prompt for this episode: What’s the stuff you can’t live without? In this hour, we go deep into our personal relationships with inanimate objects. Which, as you surely know, isn’t weird at all. Some notes: There are no recommendations this week. The entire show is filled with recommendations, so get our your pen and your highlighter and give Amazon a heads up. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, Lauren Goode is @laurengoode, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
Even though Facebook’s massive success will likely continue unabated after this week’s Congressional hearings, things are going to be very different for the social networking company in the future. One of the most impactful things this week’s hearings did was expose millions of Americans to the depth and scope of Facebook’s data collection efforts. The company’s practices were mysterious going into the hearings, and while many still can’t grasp every detail, they are less mysterious now that they’ve been picked apart by Congress and the mainstream media for a full week. We discuss what this week’s drama means for Facebook’s future relationship with its users, and the governments who seek to regulate it. We’re joined by special guest Nitasha Tiku, and our new permanent co-host (!!), Lauren Goode. Some notes: WIRED published more than a dozen Facebook headlines this week, and you can read all of them at the Facebook tag on our website. Nitasha catalogs Facebook’s broken data-sharing promises of the past. Also see the 43 things Mark Zuckerberg promised Congress he’d follow up on. Recommendations this week: The Slow Burn podcast about Nixon, the new Kronos Quartet documentary, Doing Harm, and The Vanity Fair Diaries. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, Nitasha Tiku is @nitashatiku, Lauren Goode is @laurengoode, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
There’s a new push in the industry toward computers that are always connected and don’t need Wi-Fi. They also have insane battery life and exceedingly thin hardware profiles. Sounds like an iPad right? Or maybe a phone? Correct; These devices have mobile processors in them. Microsoft and its partners are bringing these mobile-like computers, called Always Connected PCs, to market this spring. We also learned of new rumors this week that Apple will start making its own processors to go inside Macs, and we can guess that those chips will have a few things in common with the mobile chips Apple already makes. WIRED’s market editor Brendan Nystedt joins us this week to discuss these exciting times ahead for mobile computing. Some notes: Microsoft’s vision for Always Connected PCs. New iPads. The rumors about Apple’s switch from Intel chips to its own custom silicon. Recommendations this week: Steven Levy’s Hackers. The Fortune BroadSheet newsletter. And Drag City is now on Spotify. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, Brendan Nystedt is @bnystedt, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
Apple released new iPads this week at a splashy event in Chicago. Actually, the new iPads are very much like the old iPads, and even priced the same at $329. But the new 2018 iPad has an updated processor, and Apple has added support for the Pencil, so now you can draw stuff on it. One other thing you’ll get on the new iPad is a more robust toolset for teachers and students. We go over what’s new and what’s old with the iPad, and we talk about Apple’s place in the education space and how it’s aiming to win back some hearts and minds from Google and Microsoft. Some notes: New iPads, read all about ’em. Arielle’s story about Apple’s place in the education market. Our roundup of Apple hardware for schools. The Verge‘s Paul Miller on the Xcode cliff. Recommendations this week: Get a library card and get free Kindle books, and try the Massdrop x NuForce EDC3 headphones for some heady, heavy audio. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
This week, a self-driving Volvo owned by Uber struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona. We won’t know the exact details of what happened until much later once Uber, the local police, and the federal government have completed their investigations. But the tragedy has opened up many questions about how self-driving car technology works, and particularly how well these robotic cars can see what’s happening around them. Alex Davies and Aarian Marshall from WIRED’s transportation desk join us this week to talk about autonomous vehicle safety, Lidar, street design, and the human component. Some notes: Aarian’s initial report about the Tempe crash. Her analysis of Uber’s dashcam video. The crash comes at a time when pedestrian deaths are spiking. Aarian on the ethics of testing self-driving tech on public roads. Alex explains Lidar. Read our complete guide to self-driving cars. Recommendations this week: The Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody, Facebook Lite, and clean your damn floors. A complete guide to managing your Facebook privacy settings. Send the hosts feedback on Twitter. Alex is @adavies47, Aarian is @aarianmarshall, and Mike is @snackfight. Bling the main Gadget Lab hotline at @GadgetLab or reach the transportation desk at @wiredtransport. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
With so many smart glasses showing up as prototypes and, sometimes, as finished consumer products, we have to ask ourselves: Where is this all going? Some say the future of augmented reality is a set of glasses you wear on your head, speaking and gesturing your commands. Others think it’s just your smartphone, which you hold up to see the world in a new light, Pokemon Go style. Whatever it is, we can see the first steps toward this future around us today. Some notes: Why it’s so hard to make smart glasses look good. The Intel Vaunt glasses get written up at The Verge. Mashable tries the Bose AR prototype. Recommendations this week: Allbirds Trees, and the NYT Magazine‘s profile of Leopoldo López. Send the hosts feedback on Twitter. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
Google’s new Clips camera takes short looping videos of your kids and your pets, and it does it all using AI. Sure, that sounds like some weird technophobic nightmare—Google, one of the most data-thirsty companies on the planet, pointing a camera at your kids? But the way the company designed the Clips keeps all of your visual memories private until you decide to share them, if you decide to share them at all. Mike and Arielle talk about how Google’s innovative approach to computer vision in consumer products could lead to other types of digital cameras that are as private as a Polaroid. Some notes: Mike’s review of the Google Clips camera. Recommendations this week: Instant: The Story of Polaroid by Christopher Bonanos, and the music of Shel Silverstein. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
The way you control Apple’s smart speaker, the HomePod, is pretty cool. You just talk to it. But Siri, Apple’s voice assistant, can’t make the speaker do much beyond the basics and can only summon music from Apple-owned cloud services. That sets it behind the other products in the voice-activated speaker race—most notably those from Amazon or Google—which are capable, flexible, and largely platform-neutral when it comes to streaming. It’s too bad Siri can’t play internet radio or the deep cuts from your local MP3 library, because the speaker itself sounds absolutely amazing. Mike and Arielle discuss the good and bad points about the HomePod, and tell you whether or not it’s worth your Satoshis. Some notes: Mike’s HomePod review. Our original HomePod story from the 2017 launch. Mike also reviewed the Google Home Max and the Sonos One smart speakers. Recommendations this week: WeCroak and KCRW’s Good Food. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
Everything changed for Facebook two years ago. The company was accused of making politically biased choices about which news stories showed up as trending topics in users’ news feeds. The adjustments Facebook made in response to those criticisms not only changed Facebook’s platform in fundamental ways, but it also significantly altered the landscape of politics in America and elsewhere. WIREDs editor in chief Nick Thompson has just published—along with his coauthor, contributing editor Fred Vogelstein—a lengthy cover story about Facebook’s “two years of hell.” The gripping saga shows how the social network’s power to affect how its users see the world and its inaction in combatting bad actors have had disastrous consequences. This episode isn’t about gadgets, but it’s an important listen nonetheless. Some notes: Read the Facebook story, which is also WIRED magazine’s March cover story. The launch of Instant Articles. Adam Mosseri’s 2016 post about the initial News Feed tweaks. Last month, Facebook tweaked the News Feed again. Nick interviews Tristan Harris in 2017. Mark Zuckerberg’s dream of the global community. Recommendations this week: You Are Not a Gadget by Jaron Lanier, Jennifer Kahn’s profile of Lanier in The New Yorker, Havit’s Ultra Thin mechanical keyboard, and the game of Backgammon. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, Nick Thompson is @nxthompson, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
You may find it hard to close Facebook and get on with your day, and you may flick open Twitter as soon as you wake up, or browse your feeds for an hour every night before you fall asleep. But are you addicted to social media? Are your app usage habits detrimental to your greater sense of wellbeing? Are the technologies we’ve been praising for a decade really bad for you? The science of app addiction has so far been inconclusive, but that hasn’t stopped a chorus of prominent voices in tech from urging Silicon Valley to reverse its trend of making extra-sticky apps that soak up our attention. We welcome WIRED’s senior science writer Robbie Gonzalez to the show to discuss this call for reversal, where the science of technology addiction stands, and ways we can cope when we’re feeling overwhelmed by our feeds. Some notes: Read Robbie’s story about the science of app addiction and his interview with Catherine Price. Read Simone Stolzhoff’s piece reconnecting with the students in BJ Fogg’s “Facebook Class” of ten years ago. Fogg’s paper on captive technology from 1998. The Captology blog. Recommendations this week: Forest, Space, and Essential’s Earphones HD USB-C headphones. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, Robbie Gonzalez is @rtg0nzalez, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
January has so far proven to be one of the busiest months for the transportation industry. CES in early January was flooded with car news, including the debut of a new $45,000 electric SUV by a Chinese Tesla competitor called Byton. Then, just days after CES wrapped, we had the Detroit auto show, where America’s largest car-makers trot out their designs for the next year. WIRED transportation editor Alex Davies pays close attention to all of these announcements and developments. He joins us this week to discuss the latest in autonomous car tech, electric driving, and why China is the future of the auto industry. Some notes: What we’ve already learned about the future of cars in 2018. Jack Stewart on Byton’s launch at CES. How automakers getting into self-driving tech are turning to a new breed of manufacturing partners. Recommendations this week: Wormwood on Netflix, Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich, and Electric Dreams on Amazon. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, Alex Davies is @adavies47, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
With Facebook de-prioritizing news stories in its users feeds, some nearly two billion Facebook devotees are going to see big changes in their news consumption habits. And of course, hundreds of publishers are going to see big changes in their revenue and audience-growth models. This week, we talk about news on the internet—how we read it, where we read it, and how we share it. We also say farewell to David Pierce, who is leaving WIRED this week. This will be his last Gadget Lab episode. Some notes: The changes at Facebook. Aggregators and curators to check out: Digg, Nuzzel, and Flipboard. Recommendations this week: The Tedium newsletter, Cocaine & Rhinestones, and Casey Newton’s The Interface newsletter. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric, David Pierce is @pierce, and Michael Calore is @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week’s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here’s how: If you’re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here’s the RSS feed. We’re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it’s released. If you still can’t figure it out, or there’s another platform you use that we’re not on, let us know.
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WIRED
Podcast Status
Hiatus/Finished
Started
Mar 3rd, 2017
Latest Episode
Nov 9th, 2018
Release Period
Weekly
Episodes
63
Avg. Episode Length
About 1 hour
Explicit
No
Language
English

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