With a Side of Knowledge

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The idea behind this show is pretty simple: We invite scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for an informal conversation about their work, and then we turn those brunches into a podcast.It’s a tough job, but somebody has to do it.Shea Serrano is a staff writer for the sports and pop culture website The Ringer and the author of three New York Times bestsellers, including Basketball (And Other Things) and The Rap Year Book. The most recent of the three, Movies (And Other Things), published by Twelve, came out just last month. So as you might imagine, Shea is in pretty high demand at the moment.And while he didn’t have a visit to Notre Dame planned, that didn’t stop us from jumping at the chance to invite him to come on the show to talk about the new book and things like righting wrongs at the Oscars, Heath Ledger’s portrayal of the Joker, and how kids in ’80s movies always seemed to be riding things.How this interview came to be is a good story in and of itself, and that’s where Shea and host Ted Fox started their phone conversation, swapping the background noise of brunch for the occasional clicking of a turn signal and other sounds of a man on the move.LINKShea’s new book: Movies (And Other Things)
The idea behind this show is pretty simple: We invite scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for an informal conversation about their work, and then we turn those brunches into a podcast.It’s a tough job, but somebody has to do it.Like us, Adela Mizrachi works in communications at a university, but that’s not the reason we asked her to come on the show. At least not the main one.See, Adela is also the founder of something called Podcast Brunch Club, which interested us because … well, for the exact reason you’d expect. So we, a podcast that records over brunch, invited her out to brunch, to talk about Podcast Brunch Club, the Podcast Brunch Club podcast, and trends in podcasting as a whole.Did we mention podcasts? Or brunch?And fun story: Since we recorded this interview, one of our very own listeners, Joseph Caudle, has started a Podcast Brunch Club chapter right here in South Bend. There are currently more than 60 such chapters around the world.LINKSPodcast Brunch Club website: podcastbrunchclub.comForbes Q&A with Adela: Is The Podcast Club The New Book Club?
The idea behind this show is pretty simple: We invite scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for an informal conversation about their work, and then we turn those brunches into a podcast.It’s a tough job, but somebody has to do it.John McGreevy is the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at Notre Dame and served as dean of the University’s College of Arts and Letters from 2008–2018. Specializing in modern political and religious history, he is the author of three books and has received major fellowships from the Mellon Foundation and the American Council of Learned Societies, among others. John joined host Ted Fox to talk about the most recent of those three books, American Jesuits and the World: How an Embattled Religious Order Made Modern Catholicism Global, which was published by Princeton University Press.American Jesuits and the World focuses on the period after the nation’s founding, in the 19th and early 20th centuries, when John says the Jesuits were viewed, often disparagingly, as “the most Catholic of all Catholics.” It was against this backdrop that they authored an American story with just as many layers as you would expect.LINKJohn’s Book: American Jesuits and the World: How an Embattled Religious Order Made Modern Catholicism Global
The idea behind this show is pretty simple: A university campus is a destination for all kinds of interesting people, so why not invite some of these folks out to brunch, where we’ll have an informal conversation about their work, and then we’ll turn those brunches into a podcast?It’s a tough job, but somebody has to do it.With apologies to Jack Kerouac, this is the first of two “on the road” episodes we recorded in Brooklyn, New York, while attending On Air Fest 2019. It features two of our favorite podcasters, Elah Feder and Annie Minoff, who co-host and produce Undiscovered, the podcast from WNYC’s iconic radio show Science Friday.Through the hums and hisses of a Brooklyn coffee shop, Elah and Annie talked with host Ted Fox about how they look for stories that haven’t been told, the importance of good communication between the scientific community and the rest of us, and the paleontologist at the center of one of their most memorable episodes—who also might be the one person you’d want at your side in the event of the zombie apocalypse.
We like to try and do something special around the holidays.In 2019, we counted down our Top 5 most-played episodes of the year. But we thought we’d try something a little different for 2020.If you’re a regular listener of the show, you’ve probably figured out we like to read. A lot. So this time, we’re revisiting five of our favorite interviews we’ve done with authors in the three-and-a-half seasons of making this podcast. We call it “Happy Author Days.”This one is our conversation with Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan, aka The Fug Girls, titled “On Royal Novels and Writing Partners” and first published September 24th, 2020.We hope you enjoy it and have the chance to make time for some great reading this holiday season.LINKSHeather and Jessica’s Two Royal Novels: The Royal We and The Heir AffairOriginal Episode Transcript
We like to try and do something special around the holidays.In 2019, we counted down our Top 5 most-played episodes of the year. But we thought we’d try something a little different for 2020.If you’re a regular listener of the show, you’ve probably figured out we like to read. A lot. So this time, we’re revisiting five of our favorite interviews we’ve done with authors in the three-and-a-half seasons of making this podcast. We call it “Happy Author Days.”This one is our conversation with PEN/Faulkner winner Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi, titled “On Exile, Literature, and Feeling Small Before the Page” and first published on August 1st, 2019.We hope you enjoy the episode and come back for the final installment in the series tomorrow.LINKSAzareen’s PEN/Faulkner-Winning Novel: Call Me ZebraOriginal Episode Transcript
We like to try and do something special around the holidays.In 2019, we counted down our Top 5 most-played episodes of the year. But we thought we’d try something a little different for 2020.If you’re a regular listener of the show, you’ve probably figured out we like to read. A lot. So this time, we’re revisiting five of our favorite interviews we’ve done with authors in the three-and-a-half seasons of making this podcast. We call it “Happy Author Days.”This one is our conversation with Pulitzer winner Marilynne Robinson, titled “On Writing and Saying Something True” and first published on October 18, 2018.We hope you enjoy the episode and come back for the next installment in the series tomorrow.LINKMarilynne's Pulitzer-Winning Novel: GileadOriginal Episode Transcript
We like to try and do something special around the holidays.In 2019, we counted down our Top 5 most-played episodes of the year. But we thought we’d try something a little different for 2020.If you’re a regular listener of the show, you’ve probably figured out we like to read. A lot. So this time, we’re revisiting five of our favorite interviews we’ve done with authors in the three-and-a-half seasons of making this podcast. We call it “Happy Author Days.”This one is our conversation with spy novelist Lauren Wilkinson, titled “On ‘American Spy’ and Finding It on the Page” and first published on October 8th, 2020.We hope you enjoy the episode and come back for the next installment in the series tomorrow.LINKSLauren’s Novel: American SpyOriginal Episode Transcript
We like to try and do something special around the holidays.In 2019, we counted down our Top 5 most-played episodes of the year. But we thought we’d try something a little different for 2020.If you’re a regular listener of the show, you’ve probably figured out we like to read. A lot. So this time, we’re revisiting five of our favorite interviews we’ve done with authors in the three-and-a-half seasons of making this podcast. We call it “Happy Author Days.”This one is our conversation with Muhammad Ali biographer Jonathan Eig, titled “On Muhammad Ali and a Knockout Biography” and first published on March, 19, 2020.We hope you enjoy the episode and come back for the next installment in the series tomorrow.LINKJonathan’s Biography of Muhammad Ali: Ali: A LifeOriginal Episode Transcript
We typically host scholars, makers, and professionals for informal conversations about their work—formerly over brunch, currently over Zoom.But for these bonus mini-episodes, we change things up a bit, asking Notre Dame researchers and staff to talk about something that both makes them happy and has no direct connection to what they do at the university.In other words, if you thought a podcast with a waffle for a logo couldn’t get even more casual, you’d be wrong.Here, Liz Harter, Notre Dame’s social media manager, shares the genesis of her enduring love for *NSYNC and other early 2000s pop music, and how, in a quirky twist of fate, that proved to be an asset professionally. And as a bonus on top of a bonus, Liz has curated a Spotify playlist of eight of her must-have pop hits just for us. It includes four *NSYNC tracks for reasons you’ll understand shortly.LINKSpotify Playlist: Liz’s Pop PicksEpisode Transcript
Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing.It’s still a pretty fantastic job.Jennifer Dasal is curator of modern and contemporary art at the North Carolina Museum of Art. After graduating from the University of California, Davis, she earned an M.A. in art history from Notre Dame and worked as assistant to the curator of Western art at Notre Dame’s Snite Museum. So this episode was something of a homecoming—just without the actual coming back to campus.Jennifer is the author of the book ArtCurious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art History, published earlier this year by Penguin Books. ArtCurious the book was inspired by ArtCurious the podcast, a show she launched more than four years ago and has written, produced, and hosted ever since.In this podcast, Jennifer introduced us to several of the fascinating stories she unwinds in the book, ranging from the CIA’s connection to Abstract Expressionism and everything you thought you knew about Norman Rockwell to the mystery of the Mona Lisa’s twin sister. There was also the matter of whether we know who actually created what some in the art world consider the most influential piece of the 20th century—which, oh by the way, happens to be an upside-down urinal.And as descriptive as that last sentence sounds, talking about visual art in an audio medium isn’t usually so simple. That makes what Jennifer does on episodes of ArtCurious all the more impressive, and why we made sure to ask her about the podcast, as well.LINKSJennifer’s Book: ArtCurious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art HistoryJennifer’s Podcast: ArtCuriousEpisode Transcript
Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing.It’s still a pretty fantastic job.Kirsten Martin is a faculty member in Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business and a faculty affiliate of the Notre Dame Technology Ethics Center. Recognized nationally for her expertise in privacy, technology, and corporate responsibility, she joined the University this fall and holds the William P. and Hazel B. White Center Chair of Technology Ethics.Kirsten’s research, including studies of online privacy and the ethics of data aggregation, has been funded by the National Science Foundation, and she serves as the technology and business ethics editor for the Journal of Business Ethics. Earlier this year, Columbia University Press published her co-authored book The Power of AND: Responsible Business Without Trade-Offs.Kirsten and host Ted Fox started their conversation with what does and does not tend to bother people about their data being gathered through websites and apps—and how most of us don’t realize the extent to which that’s happening. They spent some time on her research on location data in particular.From there, they talked about things we, as consumers, can do to at least mitigate the spread of our personal data, and why she’s skeptical of any argument from industry that contends governmental regulation would be too costly. They wrapped up with a question inspired by her new book—namely:When it comes to business, who is a business in business for?LINKSKirsten’s TEDx Talk: “It’s Not Their Story to Tell: Why Companies Should Respect Privacy Online”Kirsten’s Coauthored Book: The Power of AND: Responsible Business Without Trade-OffsEpisode Transcript
We’re going to go out on a limb and assume that you’ve heard Election Day is next week. It’s kind of hard to miss.And while we don’t have a new election-themed episode for you, we did release two interviews earlier this year that we thought would be worth combining into one supersized pod now—not only because they’re still timely, but also because the guests have an interesting connection to one another.So here, we’re starting out with the episode “On Reporting and Politics,” which came out on June 11th and features Robert Costa of The Washington Post and Washington Week. In the course of listening to it, you’ll get a preview of sorts of episode two with author and retired Notre Dame professor Bob Schmuhl, Robert’s mentor, who talked to us “On the Presidency and Possibility” for an episode that was released January 30th.Whether you’re listening to these conversations for the first time or checking them out again, we think you’ll enjoy them just as much as we do.Robert Costa Episode Notes and TranscriptBob Schmuhl Episode Notes and Transcript
Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing.It’s still a pretty fantastic job.Lisa Fazio is an assistant professor of psychology and human development at Vanderbilt University. She and her team in the Building Knowledge Lab study how children and adults learn new information, true and false, and how to correct errors in people’s knowledge.Lisa’s research has applications in both the educational environment of the classroom and out in the world, including when it comes to how our brains process the inexhaustible stream of headlines, stories, videos, memes, likes, shares, and whatever else the Internet serves up to us at all hours of the day and night.Lisa and host Ted Fox framed their conversation around a study she and one of her colleagues at Vanderbilt published in the September 2020 issue of the journal Psychological Science. It’s a paper that builds on previous work by her and many others related to how the number of times we hear a statement repeated impacts whether we think it’s true … even if it’s not.In addition to implications for how we consume information on social media and elsewhere, this illusory truth effect has a through line to Lisa’s research in education. And as she explains, all of us—no matter our age or our beliefs—must navigate the same internal mechanism that associates repetition with truth.Whether this inclination serves us well or causes problems depends on the circumstances. But when it is problematic, such as in the case of misinformation, Lisa suggests a counter strategy that befits this, a podcast founded on the idea of brunch. It’s called:The truth sandwich.LINKSPreprint Version of Psychological Science Paper: “The Effect of Repetition on Truth Judgments Across Development” Episode Transcript
Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing.It’s still a pretty fantastic job.Lauren Wilkinson is the author of the novel American Spy, which was published by Random House in 2019 and subsequently named one of the best books of the year by The New York Times Book Review, Time, NPR, Entertainment Weekly, Esquire, and BuzzFeed, among others. Including it on his summer reading list, former President Barack Obama described it as “a whole lot more than just a spy thriller, wrapping together the ties of family, of love, and of country.”In addition to penning a critically acclaimed novel, Lauren has taught writing at Columbia University and the Fashion Institute of Technology and was a 2013 Center for Fiction Emerging Writers Fellow. Her writing has appeared in publications like Granta, The Believer, New York magazine, and The New York Times, and she also writes for television.During this conversation, Lauren and host Ted Fox talked about some of the big themes in American Spy, including how we understand the term “American,” as well as the seven-year process she went through to write the book. That story involves a surprising connection between her novel and one of those by one of our past guests, Pulitzer-winner Marilynne Robinson. Lastly, and on a completely unrelated note, at the very end of the interview, you might catch Lauren’s subtle nod to the New York City diner of Seinfeld fame that is Ted’s go-to background on Zoom.We guess you could say we believe that, if you can’t go to coffee, you bring the iconic TV sitcom coffee shop to you.LINKSLauren’s novel: American SpyEpisode transcriptWith a Side of Knowledge episode 2.1 with Marilynne Robinson: “On Writing and Saying Something True”
Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing.It’s still a pretty fantastic job.Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan are the authors of four novels, most recently The Heir Affair, which was published this summer by Grand Central and is the sequel to their bestseller, The Royal We. Much like the two of them, the books are witty and hilarious, following the lives of a fictitious, modern-day British royal family from the perspective of a young American woman who falls in love with the heir to the throne while both are studying at Oxford.And it’s fitting that Heather—a 1999 Notre Dame grad, by the way—and Jessica should write about royals because they are something akin to internet royalty themselves. They are the creators of Go Fug Yourself, the iconic website that bears witness to “fantastically ugly” celebrity fashion. Their work has also appeared in publications ranging from New York magazine to Vanity Fair, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Cosmopolitan, W magazine, and Glamour.Heather and Jessica talked to host Ted Fox about their new book and how they work together as a writing team as well as what makes for successful characters and the challenges of writing a sequel. The three made some time at the end to discuss the do’s and don’ts of covering celebrity fashion, too.As for where they started, Ted had the opportunity to see just how well Heather and Jessica know each other’s writing.LINKSHeather and Jessica’s two royal novels: The Royal We and The Heir AffairHeather and Jessica’s website: gofugyourself.comEpisode Transcript
Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing.It’s still a pretty fantastic job.Alyssa Bereznak is a staff writer for theringer.com. She covers tech and culture, with a focus on media, celebrity, and how the internet is changing our lives. All these interests came together in a podcast she recently hosted and reported for The Ringer about a trivia app for your smartphone that aimed to do nothing less than change the future of television.As you’d probably guess, it didn’t quite get there. Alyssa’s podcast, “Boom/Bust: The Rise and Fall of HQ Trivia,” tells that story while delving into the workings of our attention economy across eight compelling and insightful episodes.She and host Ted Fox started their conversation with HQ Trivia, its meteoric rise to daily must-watch status for millions of people, and what was on the other side of that peak. That then led to them discussing the experience of making a podcast during the pandemic and other elements of our current media and internet landscape, including what happens at The Ringer when one of the biggest musicians in the world announces out of nowhere she has a new album coming that day at midnight.And we promise you, Alyssa’s tweet-length review of Taylor Swift’s folklore is not one to be missed.LINKSAlyssa’s Podcast: “Boom/Bust: The Rise and Fall of HQ Trivia”Alyssa’s Writing for The RingerEpisode Transcript
Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing.It’s still a pretty fantastic job.Deb Amlen is the head writer and senior editor of “Wordplay,” the crossword column of The New York Times, where she’ll teach you how to be a better solver while also making you laugh. She’s particularly well-suited to this work.The author of the humor book It's Not PMS, It's You!, Deb got her start in crosswords making puzzles for The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other newspapers. She’s also been a senior columnist for Yahoo! Tech, where she wrote the humor column “Buzzology,” and was on the original constructing team that made crosswords for The Onion’s A.V. Club.We connected for this episode because Deb was gracious enough to take some time for host Ted Fox, one of those ill-fated souls who loves solving—or more accurately, attempting to solve—The New York Times crossword puzzle most days of the week. Their conversation wound its way from puzzles as a form of creative expression and even a metaphor for handling the challenges of life to more practical matters like how crosswords are constructed and strategies for getting better at them. And on that getting better note, let us just say:Beware the rebus.LINKSThe New York Times “Wordplay” SectionCrossword Puzzle Collaboration Directory (Facebook Group)Episode Transcript
Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing. It's still a pretty fantastic job.If you’ve listened to any of our first 50 or so episodes, you may have heard host Ted Fox say at the end that “With a Side of Knowledge is a production of the Office of the Provost” here at Notre Dame. You also may have wondered:What exactly is a provost? If so, it’s your lucky day.The provost is the University’s chief academic officer. And we’ve chosen this episode, our season four premiere, to tell you that because you’re about to hear from Notre Dame’s new provost, Marie Lynn Miranda.Marie Lynn succeeded Tom Burish on July 1, but she spent the several months before her official start date getting to know her new university and helping Notre Dame navigate the myriad challenges presented by the coronavirus.Like so many here and elsewhere, a lot of Marie Lynn’s time these days continues to be devoted to how to best meet these challenges. But as she noted in the course of our conversation, she doesn’t want the demands of the moment to keep Notre Dame from also attending to its broader mission as a university.We thought about this interview in much the same way, wanting to give you a chance to get to know Marie Lynn Miranda the award-winning teacher, the founder of the Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, and most definitely the person, in addition to the chief academic officer at Notre Dame.That meant talking to her about not only what she could take from being provost at Rice University during Hurricane Harvey and apply to leading during a pandemic, but also about why she loves her dogs so much. We covered her ongoing and active research in public health—including an Indiana COVID-19 registry you can find linked below—as well as the time she quoted A League of Their Own to her son’s Little League team. We also discussed institutional diversity and inclusion … and how she still trades emails with Coach K at Duke.As for her Notre Dame story, that actually started some 60 years ago.LINKSResearch Study: Indiana COVID-19 RegistryEpisode Transcript
We typically invite scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for an informal conversation about their work, and then we turn those brunches into a podcast.But for these bonus mini-episodes, we change things up a bit, asking Notre Dame researchers to talk about something that both makes them happy and has no direct connection to their academic pursuits.In other words, if you thought a podcast recorded over brunch couldn’t get even more casual, you’d be wrong.Here, Richard Jones, Walter H. Annenberg-Edmund P. Joyce Director of Notre Dame’s Gallivan Program in Journalism, Ethics, and Democracy, and Victoria St. Martin, distinguished visiting journalist with the Gallivan Program and the print publications coordinator with Notre Dame Student Media, join host Ted Fox via Zoom to discuss a musician whose art dared us to love each other for exactly who we are:Prince.LINK:Richard and Victoria’s previous appearance on the podcast: “On Real News and Purple Rain” (ep. 1.4)
The idea behind this show is pretty simple: We invite scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for an informal conversation about their work, and then we turn those brunches into a podcast.It’s a tough job, but somebody has to do it.For this, our season 3 finale, we’re turning the virtual interview chair around on Notre Dame alum Robert Costa, national political reporter for The Washington Post and the moderator and managing editor of Washington Week on PBS.While Robert’s work is the news, he and host Ted Fox talked more about the craft of journalism generally—and political journalism specifically—than everything going on in our country and our world in 2020. We figure you have much better outlets for content like that, such as Robert’s own reporting and that of the journalists from diverse organizations and backgrounds he talks to on Washington Week.That said, the health disparities magnified by the coronavirus and the recent examples of police brutality are just the latest reminders of how much we need the work and perspectives of African-American journalists in particular. So while it’s not directly related to this episode, we wanted to use this spot to recommend you follow Richard Jones and Victoria St. Martin, formerly of The New York Times and The Washington Post, respectively, and currently shaping the next generation of journalists through their work with students at Notre Dame. We’ve put links to both of their Twitters in the notes below.And speaking of episode notes, there’s also a video of the late Tim Russert there that you’re going to hear Robert talk about. It’s one of many great stories he shared on pursuing a career as a reporter in the nation’s capital during a time of rapid change in the news industry, a journey that for him has included succeeding the legendary Gwen Ifill at PBS. He also used the provost office at Notre Dame to illustrate how anonymous sourcing works. You know, in case we ever really need to get anything off our chests.Take good care, and we’ll be talking to you again soon. Because sources close to the podcast tell us there might be some bonus episodes on the way this summer.LINKSRichard Jones’ Twitter: @richard_g_jonesVictoria St. Martin’s Twitter: @VStMartinRobert Costa’s Twitter: @costareportsVideo Excerpts of Tim Russert’s Red Smith Lecture: “When Politicians Meet the Press”Full Transcript of Russert Lecture
The idea behind this show is pretty simple: We invite scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for an informal conversation about their work, and then we turn those brunches into a podcast.It’s a tough job, but somebody has to do it.An expert on race and technology, Mutale Nkonde is the founding CEO of AI for the People, a nonprofit creative agency. She is currently a fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and at Stanford University’s Digital Civil Society Lab. She has also been a fellow at the research institute Data & Society, and her work has been covered by MIT Technology Review, WIRED, and PBS NewsHour, among others.Mutale and host Ted Fox were supposed to get brunch back in mid-March, when she was scheduled to be a panelist at a conference hosted by the Notre Dame Technology Ethics Center, a new center at the University that supports multi- and interdisciplinary research on questions related to the impact of technology on humanity.However, like pretty much everything else these last couple of months, that event had to be cancelled. Fortunately, Mutale was still up for doing the podcast remotely, so she and Ted traded waffles for Zoom and had a conversation about artificial intelligence that started out by digging into what AI, machine learning, and deep learning even are. They then talked about the ways this seemingly dispassionate tech can exhibit very real bias—not to mention its implications for privacy and the future of work in the age of COVID-19—as well as her work on Capitol Hill and at Harvard.As for the three minutes they spent on Netflix’s Tiger King? Even that wound its way back to algorithms.
We typically invite scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for an informal conversation about their work, and then we turn those brunches into a podcast.But for these bonus mini-episodes, we change things up a bit, asking Notre Dame researchers to talk about something that both makes them happy and has no direct connection to their academic pursuits.In other words, if you thought a podcast recorded over brunch couldn’t get even more casual, you’d be wrong.Here, Meghan Sullivan, professor of philosophy and director of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, joins host Ted Fox via Zoom to discuss a passion she’s had since childhood, one that played a memorable role as she earned tenure:Building with LEGO.
The idea behind this show is pretty simple: We invite scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for an informal conversation about their work, and then we turn those brunches into a podcast.It’s a tough job, but somebody has to do it.Last year, Jon Goh earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Stanford. While completing a doctoral degree is a monumental accomplishment by any standard, one requiring an awe-inspiring amount of dedication and hard work, it’s not the kind of thing a podcast at a university more than 2,000 miles away would typically hear about.But then we saw the video.In it, a DeLorean—the ’80s car made iconic by the movie Back to the Future—accelerated, turned, drifted, and literally burned rubber through a highly complicated race course … and it did it all by itself.Right away, we knew we had to try to talk to Jon, the guy who had shared the video and whose research at the Stanford Dynamic Design Lab was integral to building this incredible car, particularly the piece that programmed it to expertly wind its way through the course that only the most advanced drift racers would dare tackle.Several Twitter direct messages later, there he and host Ted Fox were chatting over Zoom about everything that went into turning a standard DeLorean into this DeLorean as well as the future of autonomous vehicles and why on Earth you’d do all of this in the first place.You know, beyond the fact that it’s just super cool.LINKSee the DeLorean in Action: Story and Video From Stanford
The idea behind this show is pretty simple: We invite scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for an informal conversation about their work, and then we turn those brunches into a podcast.It’s a tough job, but somebody has to do it.Jenni Heissel is an assistant professor in the Graduate School of Defense Management at the Naval Postgraduate School. Her research at the intersection of economics, public policy, and psychology has been covered by The Atlantic, The New York Times, NPR, the Brookings Evidence Speaks series, and a number of other outlets. She just received a large grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study the Department of Defense’s parental support policies.A 2007 graduate of Notre Dame, Jenni holds a master of public policy degree from Duke and a Ph.D. in human development and social policy from Northwestern. Her interdisciplinary expertise has driven her to pursue some really interesting and highly applicable research not only in the area of parenting but also education, including on in-person versus online instruction and what impact, if any, school start times have on students’ academic performance.In addition, she and host Ted Fox discussed a paper she has forthcoming in The Journal of Human Resources focused on how the siblings of teen moms are affected by the arrival of the baby, a dynamic that hasn’t been closely studied to this point.As you would expect these days, the conversation was a virtual one, and that was thanks to Jenni’s husband seeing a tweet we sent looking for guests, and then her taking the time to reach out.We’re thrilled that she did.
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Podcast Details

Created by
University of Notre Dame
Podcast Status
Active
Started
May 6th, 2018
Latest Episode
Dec 18th, 2020
Release Period
2 per month
Episodes
71
Avg. Episode Length
32 minutes
Explicit
No
Order
Episodic
Language
English

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