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Migrant Caravan

  • 3 months ago

A caravan of over 7,000 Central American migrants is about one thousand miles from the American border entry. Thursday, President Trump tweeted “To those in the Caravan, turnaround, we are not letting people into the United States illegally. Go back to your Country and if you want, apply for citizenship like millions of others are doing!” The caravan began on October 13th when a group of mostly Honduran migrants made their way north. Will the migrants reach the border? What actions should President Trump take?

Migrant Caravan Podcast

  • about 2 months ago

Today we will talk about the Migrant Caravan and Asylum Seekers

Migrant Caravan Communications

  • 3 months ago

Three thousand migrants from Latin America are attempting to enter the US en masse. How are they organising it - is it just word of mouth or does technology play a part? Digital forensics, why an online washing machine could land you in hot water. Robot flies become real but they won’t be landing in your drinks any time soon. The role of fake news in starting World War II. How the Nazis conned the allies into allowing them to invade Czechoslovakia, with a very modern sounding deception. (Photo caption: Thousands of Honduran migrants resumed their march toward the United States from the southern Mexican city of Ciudad Hidalgo – credit: AFP/Getty Images) Producer: Julian Siddle

Migrant Caravan (EP.73)

  • 3 months ago

Summary Starting in Honduras in Central America in mid-October of ‘18, a migrant caravan of at least 5,000 people is committed to traveling through Guatemala and Mexico to enter the United States. The question swirling about this caravan is, “Is this an organic migration of people intending to gain peaceful entry into the US, or is it an invasion–perhaps influenced or even supported by others?” Here’s the better, necessary, underlying question, “Do we want open borders, or do we want secure borders?” Links and References Migrant Caravan Ask the Right Questions Contact Please do reach out with comments or questions.  You can email me at will@resultswithreason.com, or connect with me on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. And you can subscribe to the podcast on your favorite device through Apple Podcasts, Google, or Stitcher. Transcript Starting in Honduras in Central America in mid-October of ‘18, a migrant caravan of at least 5,000 people is committed to travelling through Guatemala and Mexico to enter the United States. The question swirling about this caravan is, “Is this an organic migration of people intending to gain peaceful entry into the US, or is it an invasion–perhaps influenced or even supported by others?” Here’s the better, necessary, underlying question, “Do we want open borders, or do we want secure borders?” Pick one. There is no middle ground. Here’s a parallel; are the water pipes in your home leaking? The answer is pretty much “yes” or “no.” Slow leaks simply take a bit longer to do their damage. An occasional drip can either be ignored or dealt with almost any time. Here’s why the question about open borders is the underlying and better question. If you support open borders, then this caravan–and the many others that may pop up if this one is successful–is not an issue. People would be legally crossing an open border, in much the same way that people are free to cross from one state in the US to another. There may be some logistical issues, e.g., how do we process, feed, house and give medical aid to this many people at the same time, but the core issue of whether they should be welcomed or not goes away. N. B. (There, I am using that again.) Note well that if you are for open borders, don’t hedge: stand up and declare your position. No waffling. And tell your fellow citizens what you expect the combination of open borders and a welfare state will create. Conversely, if you want secure borders there is no question about what to do with this or other caravans; you stop them at the border. That’s a necessary part of what it means to have a secure border. The logistical issue here is what’s needed to stop attempted illegal crossings of this size. The first thing that needs to be done to stop illegal crossings is for the US to go on record internationally, stating that it has taken a non-negotiable, bipartisan secure border stance. Once people outside the US get it that we have, and will enforce, this policy, caravans like this will not recur. And, as with the people who want open borders, if you want a secure border then stand up and state your position. Be clear. No waffling. Perhaps you have noticed that I have been talking about a secure border, not a wall; that’s for two reasons. First, a wall in every place along the border would not be the best solution to effect the desired secure border goal. Second, the word “wall” can have–or be given–a negative connotation, e.g, “He has put up a wall against everything good in his life.” Having a wall is not the desired goal, a secure border is; walls are only a part of getting to that goal. (BTW, have you ever noticed that some of the wealthier folks who are against a border wall have security walls surrounding their homes?) My strong vote is for a secure border. A nation without secure borders is no longer a nation. The states in the United States have intentionally porous borders, allowing virtually immediate citizenship, complete with voting rights, access to benefits, and all other legal citizenship rights, upon entry. I do not want to become the State of America in the United Nations of the World. Do you? Once a secure border is in place, we can then address issues like DACA, various paths to legal residency, paths to citizenship, work, welfare and paying taxes–all of that–one last time. And not before. Yes, this can be called amnesty, but I don’t care what we call it a long as it is done one last time. Without a secure border there will be repeat calls for amnesty, and repeat amnesties is simply an open border policy under a different name. Just like the leaky pipes we were talking about before, first you stop the leak, then you start fixing things. The solution is a secure border, with a generous and humane immigration policy that can be enforced–and changed as circumstances change. Without the secure border no policy, no matter how generous or humane, can be enforced–taking us right back to open borders. Today’s key point: Any conversation about immigration must start with the open border question. Every other immigration related issue will have answers that fall out from that question. Are you for a secure border, or do you want an open border? Start there, and give an unequivocal answer. Frequency I publish two podcasts each week; mid-day on Tuesday and Friday. Every week. I am also considering doing these as videos on YouTube, and would love to get your thoughts. Let’s apply the two Results With Reason main tenets to today’s issues. The two main tenets that we believe in at Results With Reason are: Personal Responsibility; practice it, teach it and Be Your Brother’s Keeper. Today’s application is again straightforward: Personal Responsibility. Engage in the political conversation. Don’t be afraid to stand up for what you believe, for what you know to be true. Be your Brother’s Keeper. Be patient with each other; some will understand what you saying immediately, others will not. Teach and encourage; don’t criticize and reject. Love and lead. Remember, we are all in this together. Now it is time for our usual parting thought. It is not enough to be informed. It is not enough to be a well informed voter. We need to act.  And if we, you and I, don’t do something, then the others who are doing something, will continue to run the show. Remember: Knowledge by itself is the booby prize. Will Luden, writing to you from my home office at 7,200’ in Colorado Springs.

17. The Migrant Caravan

  • 2 months ago

We talk about the two caravans currently heading for the border. What's real and what's not? What's the danger?

Dominski - Migrant Caravan Rally

  • about 2 months ago

In the run up to the midterm elections, coverage of the migrant caravan heading towards the United States border saturated the news. But with the midterms firmly in the rearview mirror, that story may be getting less attention. One group wants to make sure it stays on everyone’s minds.

Migrant Caravan | Dan Loney

  • 3 months ago

Dan discusses the news surrounding the caravan of migrants coming from south of Mexico and asks how the government should handle the situation.

#18 NFL & Migrant Caravan

  • 3 months ago

In today's episode, we discuss the NFL's social justice warriors Eric Reid and Malcolm Jenkins butting heads and the migrant caravan and its roots in Canadian imperialism.

Migrant Caravan Update

  • about 2 months ago

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol have suspended northbound vehicle traffic at the San Ysidro border crossing to prepare for the arrival of the migrant caravan. With the members of the caravan unable to claim asylum, and limited access into the processing points, what will this do to the Mexican economy as they remain in Tijuana. Plus, Bill breaks huge news of the funding, and the intent of the individuals that are behind it. Hint: they want a collapse in the U.S. immigration system.

22) The Migrant Caravan

  • 3 months ago

In this episode, Dylan talks about Hillary running in 2020, The migrant caravan coming to the US, GOP 2.0, and MUCH more!

#24 The Migrant Caravan

  • 3 months ago

The migrant caravan, what is it, who’s in it, and what does it tell us about our immigration system. Jordan sits down with policy analyst Cris Ramon to get in to all of that. This podcast can also be found on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play.

The migrant caravan, explained

  • 3 months ago

Vox If the migrant caravan didn’t exist, President Donald Trump might have needed to invent it. The existence of a massive group of Central Americans pushing toward the US without papers — even if they are still hundreds of miles away — seems like something Trump’s GOP might create in a lab to unleash on the eve of the midterms. But the caravan is real. The migrants in it — mostly Hondurans (with some Guatemalans), half of whom are girls and women, many intending to seek asylum in the US — are real people. They made the decision to leave their home countries, assessing that the danger of leaving was outstripped by the danger of facing gang death threats or feeding a family on $5 per day. And they made the decision to go together, joining the caravan as it progressed, instead of alone like tens of thousands of their fellow Guatemalans and Hondurans (and Salvadorans) do every year. The caravan has provided an irresistible visual for Republican closing arguments about immigration. In Trump’s first TV ad of the presidential primary in 2015, he used an image of a mass of immigrants; fact-checkers revealed the picture was in fact taken in Morocco. Now, as he nears the midterm elections, Trump has the image he wanted all along. The decision about 160 Honduran migrants made to travel as a group in the open to the US — and the decision thousands have made to join them en route — is the result of a situation that predates Trump. The United States and Mexico have worked to make the journey to the US less appealing to Central Americans, but many residents of the Northern Triangle find the prospect of eventual asylum in the US — however difficult it is to get there — more appealing than the insecurity they’re facing at home. The current wave of Northern Triangle migration raises hard questions about the distinction between economic and humanitarian migration, the US’s ability to process asylum seekers, and the role Mexico plays in the region. Those are emphatically not the questions that are coming up in the Trump-driven conversation about the caravan — which is using the sheer fact of a mass of people traveling northward to activate fears of an invasion by unknowable foreigners. 1) What is a migrant caravan? Over the past decade, there’s been a rise in the number of unaccompanied children and families crossing the US-Mexico border. Increasingly, they are people fleeing violence and insecurity, coming from the Northern Triangle of Central America — Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. Meanile, unauthorized border crossings of single adults, Mexicans, and people looking for seasonal work have greatly declined. The result is a change in the character of who is seeking to cross into the US: To get to the US-Mexico border, Northern Triangle emigrants have to get through Mexico, a journey that takes weeks. Under current US and international law, asylum seekers from Central America are allowed to apply for asylum either in Mexico or in the US. Many take the first option: Asylum applications in Mexico have gone up more than 1,000 percent since 2013, and most are from citizens of Northern Triangle countries. But applying for asylum in Mexico isn’t a walk in the park. Mexico has been accused of indiscriminate long-term detention of asylum seekers (exacerbated by a two-year backlog in processing applications), and some parts of Mexico aren’t safe for people who are already fleeing violence. The US has enlisted Mexico to apprehend Central American migrants before they get to the US. Some 950,000 Central Americans have been deported from Mexico over the past several years, and human rights groups have reported torture and disappearance by Mexican security forces. The crackdown has made an already dangerous journey more dangerous. The harder it is to get through Mexico without attracting attention from the authorities, the more that task falls to professional criminal organizations who might smuggle drugs alongside migrants or abuse migrants physically or sexually. The involvement of criminal organizations makes Mexico even more anxious to crack down. For some Central Americans, the solution to this problem is hypervisibility: traveling out in the open, as part of a large group of people that can’t simply be grabbed or disappeared. That’s the reason small human rights organizations have gotten people together, on occasion, in “caravans” — and the appeal to hundreds or thousands of migrants who’ve joined them in trying to get to the US. For some, it’s a way to call political attention to what they’re fleeing and what migrants have to endure; to others, it’s a desperate exodus; to some, it’s simply an opportunity that came along to hope for a better, safer life. 2) How did this caravan start? On October 12, 2018, a group of about 160 Hondurans set forth from the town of San Pedro Sula — which in the first half of the decade was often referred to as the “murder capital of the world” — in hopes of arriving to present...

The Migrant Caravan

  • about 1 month ago

President Trump has been determined that the migrant caravan not be allowed to enter the US. Now his administration has extended the deployment of more than 5,000 troops on the US-Mexico border to the end of January, 2019. Many of the migrants are now waiting in the Mexican border town of Tijuana for a chance to seek asylum in the US. We find out what life is like for them. Also: A group of gay and transgender migrants find safety in numbers as they wait to seek asylum in the US; we find out how the US government is using biometric data to gather intelligence on members of the migrant caravan; we hear the story behind the now-iconic photo of a mother and her two daughters running away from tear gas on the US-Mexico border; also we learn about the tiny American town where tear gas is big business; Plus, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Sonia Nazario shares her thoughts about possible solutions to the Central American migrant crisis. (Central American migrants rest after being relocated to a new temporary shelter in east Tijuana, Mexico. Credit: Guillermo Arias/Getty Images)

The Migrant Caravan

  • 2 months ago

Adam and Chet discuss the caravan full of children and pregnant women that's somehow being sold as an imminent threat to our national security.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bouns: Migrant Caravan

  • 2 months ago

This week we followed the migrant caravan that has been making its way through Mexico and could reach the U.S. border in a matter of weeks. We have compiled those stories from this week and brought them to you in this short bonus episode.

Rich Fitzgerald - Migrant Caravan

  • 3 months ago

After hearing the national perspective, Rich Fitzgerald joins John to discuss how the Migrant Caravan news could have a possible local effect in Pittsburgh. 

Migrant Caravan & Georgia Voter Suppression

  • 3 months ago

Ricardo D. Wrice, Simone Cherie and DoubleR Muzik are on the Leadership Blend! In Season 4 Episode 33, they discuss the migrant caravan approaching the border and voter suppression in GA. Original Air Date: October 26, 2018 Everything is better LIVE! Hear the Leadership Blend LIVE on the TuneIn App Mondays & Fridays at 12 Noon EST or online at ibnxradio.com/talknx! Or catch up after the show when you search "The Leadership Blend" on YouTube, Spotify or Tunes! Check out today's show notes at wricecommunity.com

Counter Stories: The migrant caravan

  • 3 months ago

In this episode of Counter Stories, the team discusses the migrant caravan making its way to the U.S., as well as concerns about voter suppression ahead of next month's midterm elections.

Code Switching and Migrant Caravan

  • about 1 month ago

Brief discussion about code switching and the migrant caravan

Media Downplays Migrant Caravan Crisis

  • about 2 months ago

Janet Mefferd discusses the media coverage of the board crisis and Dr. Michael Guillen speaking on new research confirming humans of today originating from one man & one woman.

Honduran Migrant Caravan Part 1

  • 3 months ago

A caravan of Honduran migrants bound for the U.S. moved passed the Guatemalan border on Monday with of over 1,000 people and is expected to expand as it moves through Mexico. On Tuesday, President Trump tweeted “The United States has strongly informed the President of Honduras that if the large Caravan of people heading to the U.S. is not stopped and brought back to Honduras, no more money or aid will be given to Honduras, effective immediately!” What should be done to the caravan of migrants? Was this set up in time for the midterms?

Solidarity with the Migrant Caravan

  • about 1 month ago

This week William had the opportunity to speak with two people who are doing active support work for the folks involved in what’s being called the “migrant caravan”, a group of 7,000 or so people primarily from Honduras fleeting violence of many kinds. Firstly we’ll hear from Chris, who is an organizer with Enclave Caracol, a social center which stands in solidarity with migrants in Tijuana. This center sprang from Tijuana Food Not Bombs, and you can learn more about them via their Facebook page or via their wordpress site. To donate to them, you can visit the Al Otro Lado donate page and mark a donation for Enclave Caracol! In this interview, we get into how it’s been for Enclave Caracol (The Snail Enclave in English) to do support in Tijuana, some of the history regarding this particular situation, how the various cop organizations in the area have been treating folks, responses by the public and the government alike, and basic ways of how to support. Let us know what youthink or if you have a perspective on this issue by writing to us! You can also write us here. The second interview is with Elana, who is an anarchist lawyer doing support for the people in the caravan. In this interview we talk about their experiences and some about the complex legal situation that a lot of asylum seekers are faced with, plus ways to re-contextualize this caravan in anti-imperialist terms.   . … . .. The audio quality cuts out in some portions of these interviews, so apologies in advance for that. . … . .. To learn more about the history of what is going on right now, and specifically the recent history of Honduras which gave rise to this present day situation, we recommend the Alliance for Global Justice’s webinair on Honduras, which was passed to us by a comrade. It is a longer listen, and brings voices together who have been paying attention to this situation for many years, some of whom are directly impacted by it. . … . .. Show playlist here.