Audible Feast's November 2020 Listening List + Reviews

A curated episode list by
Creation Date October 27th, 2020
Updated Date Updated December 2nd, 2020
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About This List

I had so much fun doing quick reviews in October that I'm going to do it again in November. This is a month long list of everything I listen to (a window into my soul? brain? messed up psyche?) and reviews of it all.
  1. November 1-7

  2. The childcare industry in America is facing a huge crisis right now, and we can’t just blame COVID for its near collapse. We explore the attitudes and policies that led to how things got so bad, talk to Angie Garcia, a childcare provider on the ground, and report on an exciting initiative in Portland, OR, that shows us how local communities can begin to meaningfully address this massive systemic problem. Resources:Read more about the UPNOW Portland campaignThanks:Usual Wines: For $8 off your first order, go to usualwines.com and use the code doubleshift.Listen to Birthful wherever you get your podcasts.Special thanks to Lydia Kiesling and Sahar Muranovic.Want to support the work of this indie, mom-run operation? Become a member of The Double Shift. It starts at $5/mo. You get bonus content on this episode, plus other fun perks. 
  3. Iconic feminist, journalist, and activist Gloria Steinem joins Jameela this week to discuss the importance of sharing abortion stories as well as protecting abortion rights, the problems facing sex workers, white feminists joining black feminists in the work they are doing, and "hard" conversations vs. the joy of learning. 
  4. "The Sandman" a.k.a. the unstoppable legend Adam Sandler, drives a golf-ball right onto the SmartLess fairway and we all take a ride on the cart of life through blackout nerves, comfort-zones vs. ambition, the importance of family, and the nuances of the comedy brain. Fore!
  5. In the Season 2 premiere of Dear Young Rocker, we find young Chelsea where we left her - in college as a sound recording technology major. She falls in love with editing tape but starts getting distracted by self-comparison and ‘extra-curricular activities.’ She wants to make only perfect choices, but older Chelsea lets her know that’s just not realistic. For more visit dearyoungrocker.com and follow @dearyoungrocker on instagram.
  6. Choosing a major, or sticking with one, can be pretty stressful. Chelsea decides to take a break from thinking about it and joins a new yoga class instead. She feels great for the first time in a while, and more importantly, feels like she knows exactly where she wants to be for once. Older Chelsea reminds her again that there is no perfect choice and that the belief in one existing is what’s causing her existential dread in the first place. For more, visit dearyoungrocker.com and follow @dearyoungrocker on instagram.
  7. With no music in her life for the foreseeable future, Chelsea has found a way to fill the hole in her life by getting more deeply involved with the yoga classes she’s been attending. She has a life altering emotional experience at an intensive workshop, but upon reflection realizes how scary it really was. For more, visit dearyoungrocker.com and follow @dearyoungrocker on instagram.
  8. A teacher takes an interest in Chelsea and gives her some feedback that rocks her world. She also does some jamming: by herself, with a new potential band, and with her friend at the world headquarters of noodling - Guitar Center. Old Chelsea doles out some advice about making it through the ‘boring parts’ of life. For more visit dearyoungrocker.com and follow @dearyoungrocker on instagram.
  9. Singer, songwriter, and record producer Keith Urban feels incredibly confused about being Conan O’Brien’s friend.   Keith sits down with Conan to talk about playing a surprise drive-in concert for healthcare workers, quitting school to pursue his music career, and releasing his new album 'The Speed of Now Part 1.' Later, Conan envisions the mascot of the Conan O’Brien Elementary School.   Got a question for Conan? Call our voicemail: (323) 451-2821. For Conan videos, tour dates and more visit TeamCoco.com.
  10. An at-home DNA test kit reveals a horrifying truth. But who has the right to tell the story?
  11. Why the thrill of the chase stops being thrilling after a while. Planning messages to hot guys weeks in advance probably isn't healthy for a relationship; sometimes it's hard ot admit that he's just not that into you, and why does that part of my body smell like that?Stories of queer life and even queer-er sex. Probably True - the repeatedly-award-winning, slightly filthy storytelling project tackling LGBTQ issues in a fun and engaging way. Much like its creator, it is a smutty-but-charming collection of personal misadventures working to make the world a better place, one silly, sexy story at a time.  Patreon.com/ProbablyTrue / ProbablyTruePodcast.com / @ScottFlashheart  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  12. Nada Rothbart thought she’d have plenty of time to get her family out of Sarajevo. Suddenly, it was too late. This story originally aired on the Lucky podcast, listen to part two of Nada’s story “The Choice” here. Produced by Briana Breen Artwork by Teo Ducot Snap Classic - Season 9 Episode 16
  13. Every time Annie’s family comes to town, they exclude her from their plans. Annie needs to know why. Credits This episode of Heavyweight was hosted and produced by Kalila Holt, along with Stevie Lane and Jonathan Goldstein. Special thanks to Emily Condon, Alex Blumberg, Mathilde Urfalino, Mia Bloomfield, Emma Munger, Zac Schmidt, Sam Reisman, and Jackie Cohen. The show was mixed by Bobby Lord.  Music by Christine Fellows, John K Samson, Bobby Lord, Hew Time, Blue Dot Sessions, and Shanghai Restoration Project. Our theme song is by The Weakerthans courtesy of Epitaph Records.
  14. The term “suicide contagion” gets thrown around a lot in academic papers and media headlines, but what does it actually mean? The term suggests that suicidal ideation is something you can catch, but the reality is much more complicated. This week, we navigate the complexities of suicide clusters from the heart of Silicon Valley, California to the soul of Cowboy Strong, Wyoming.   Season 2 of Last Day is created in partnership with The Jed Foundation. The Jed Foundation (JED) empowers teens and young adults with the skills and support to grow into healthy, thriving adults. You can find tips, tools and resources for taking care of your emotional health available at: www.jedcares.org/lastday   Resources from the episode: Check out Lisa Hao’s Jed Talk Learn about QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention Get to know other Jed Foundation storytellers at https://www.jedfoundation.org/storytellers/. To learn more about recommendations for reporting on suicide, visit https://reportingonsuicide.org/.   If you or someone you know is struggling emotionally or feeling hopeless, it’s important to talk to someone about it now. Contact one of the resources below for a free, confidential conversation with a trained counselor anytime.    National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 Crisis Text line: Text “Connect” to 741-741 The Trevor Project: 1-866-488-7386   Support the show by checking out our sponsors: In times like these, who wants to risk going to the grocery store? Here’s where HelloFresh comes in, by offering convenient delivery right to your doorstep. Go to www.hellofresh.com/lastday90 and use code LASTDAY90 to get $90 off including free shipping. The overhauled Stitcher podcast app makes it easier to listen to podcasts on the go, including all ad free Last Day episodes on Stitcher Premium. Test it out for yourself at www.stitcherapp.com/lastday.   Dr. Nzinga Harrison teaches us all about turning addiction treatment into recovery for life in another Lemonada original, In Recovery. Check it out wherever you listen to podcasts.   To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to https://www.lemonadamedia.com/show/last-day shortly after the air date.   Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  15. In his TED Talk, “Be Human(e),” Dr. Jeremy Richman said, “We felt the world was spinning out of control and that if we didn't find something to hold on to, some reason to go on, that we'd get spun right off into this great darkness.” Jeremy delivered this message as both a neuroscientist and a grieving father. He lost his 6 yr old daughter, Avielle, in the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary shooting. This was one of his last public appearances before he died by suicide on March 29th, 2019. Today, we look at “the great darkness” with fellow Newtown residents Ian Hockley and Lee Shull and explore advocacy as a trauma response plus the toll it can take. We’re also joined by the other half of our Jed advisory team, Janis Whitlock, who provides wisdom and insight on creating a life worth living.   Season 2 of Last Day is created in partnership with The Jed Foundation. The Jed Foundation (JED) empowers teens and young adults with the skills and support to grow into healthy, thriving adults. You can find tips, tools and resources for taking care of your emotional health available at: www.jedcares.org/lastday   Resources from the episode: Watch Jeremy’s TED Talk here. Learn more about brain health from The Avielle Foundation. Keep up with Dylan’s Wings of Change. Read stories from the community at Sodina Project. To learn more about recommendations for reporting on suicide, visit https://reportingonsuicide.org/.   If you or someone you know is struggling emotionally or feeling hopeless, it’s important to talk to someone about it now. Contact one of the resources below for a free, confidential conversation with a trained counselor anytime.    National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 Crisis Text line: Text “Connect” to 741-741 The Trevor Project: 1-866-488-7386   Support the show by checking out our sponsors: Every week, fitness guru Jillian Michaels interviews experts on wellness, nutrition, and parenting. Subscribe to The Jillian Michaels Show wherever you listen to podcasts.   To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to https://www.lemonadamedia.com/show/last-day shortly after the air date.   Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  1. November 8-14

  2. In our eighth season, we’re exploring examples of some of the most expensive artworks ever sold at auction considering why they garnered so much money, and discovering their backstories. Today: Paul Cézanne’s The Card Players. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS: The Great Courses Plus: Get free access to their entire library with my special link! Indeed: ArtCurious listeners get a FREE $75 CREDIT to boost job posts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  3. A stranger attacks a jogger in D.C., sparking a four-year courtroom saga and a campaign for justice. Subscribe to The Washington Post: washingtonpost.com/canaryoffer.
  4. We head to Alabama to investigate allegations about a prominent figure in the D.C. justice system. Subscribe to The Washington Post: washingtonpost.com/canaryoffer.
  5. Unexpected roadblocks slow the search for evidence. Subscribe to The Washington Post: washingtonpost.com/canaryoffer.
  6. A judge rises to national prominence, fueled by 40 years of experience and activism. Subscribe to The Washington Post: washingtonpost.com/canaryoffer.
  7. A family reckons with the consequences of long-kept secrets. Subscribe to The Washington Post: washingtonpost.com/canaryoffer.
  8. How will the accused respond? And what will his defenders say? Subscribe to The Washington Post: washingtonpost.com/canaryoffer.
  9. Two women come face to face. Subscribe to The Washington Post: washingtonpost.com/canaryoffer.
  10. In this episode, Dr. Osterholm and host Chris Dall discuss record-breaking case numbers in the US, public trust in science amid the COVID-19 pandemic, expectations for vaccines, more details related to bubbling, and the risks associated with gatherings. Email us: OsterholmUpdate@umn.edu Support the podcast here: https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/donate-now
  11. With COVID-19 cases surging around the country and winter fast approaching, this may be the most important toolkit episode yet. Infectious diseases physician Nahid Bhadelia and indoor air quality expert Richard Corsi answer every tough question about winter safety – from holiday gatherings, to indoor dining, and flu season. Understand what’s happening with indoor particles and how to make sure homes, offices, and schools can be as safe as possible with ventilation, filters, and CO2 meters. Andy and Lana team up for the episode they say they learned the most from. And be sure to stick around for a very nice surprise at the end of the show.   Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt and Instagram @andyslavitt.   Follow Nahid Bhadelia @BhadeliaMD and Richard Corsi @CorsIAQ on Twitter.   Keep up with the work of Dr. Bhadelia and her colleagues at Boston Medical Center @The_BMC on Twitter.    In the Bubble is supported in part by listeners like you. Become a member, get exclusive bonus content, ask Andy questions, and get discounted merch at https://www.lemonadamedia.com/inthebubble/.     Support the show by checking out our sponsors! Livinguard masks have the potential to deactivate COVID-19 based on the testing they have conducted from leading universities such as the University of Arizona and the Free University in Berlin, Germany. Go to shop.livinguard.com and use the code BUBBLE10 for 10% off.   Check out these resources from today’s episode:  Learn more about the ‘Swiss Cheese Model’ Dr. Bhadelia mentions in today’s episode: https://www.theverge.com/2020/10/31/21542207/swiss-cheese-infection-control-covid-19-antivirus  Check out this FAQ guide on COVID-19 aerosol transmission, co-authored by Richard Corsi: https://docs.google.com/document/u/0/d/1fB5pysccOHvxphpTmCG_TGdytavMmc1cUumn8m0pwzo/mobilebasic  Keep up with the most pressing issues in healthcare today on the HealthCity website from Boston Medical Center: https://www.bmc.org/healthcity Read the British Medical Journal study looking at co-infections of COVID-19 and influenza: https://www.bmj.com/content/370/bmj.m3720  Find a list of MSN’s 9 Best Carbon Dioxide Meters here: https://www.msn.com/en-ca/lifestyle/rf-buying-guides/best-carbon-dioxide-meters-reviews.  Pre-order Andy’s book, Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response, here: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250770165    To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-the-bubble shortly after the air date.   Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  12. Sourdough starters! Ancient yeasts! Why we need/knead dough! And why you don't need to buy a starter to start. Polymath, particle physicist, inventor of the Xbox, and truly delightful fermentation nerd Seamus Blackley joins to chat about his kitchen adventures resurrecting dormant yeasts from 4,000 Egyptian baking vessels, plus wild yeasts, the infuriating myth of “yeast scarcity,” the beauty of everyday objects, the debt we owe our ancestors, the joy of getting to know your dough plus tons of tips for newbie and experienced bakers. The first half is all about the history of baking and yeasts and some hot Egyptian gossip, then we roll up our sleeves in the second half for how-tos. Forward this episode to anyone who bakes, who wants to bake, who lovingly feeds their jar of yeasts, who is intimidated by it or who just needs a lesson on how to slow down and enjoy the dormancy period we’re in right now. This episode’s got it all. Including some truly shameless bread puns.  Follow Seamus @SeamusBlackley and here’s one recipe tutorial megathread: https://twitter.com/SeamusBlackley/status/1135328857660305408  Follow: Egyptologist Dr. Serena Love, microbiologist Richard Bowman @RBowman1234  and the coiner of “Gastroegyptology,” Kieran Donnachie  A donation went to Boys and Girls Clubs of America: https://www.bgca.org Sponsor links: Sakara.com/ologies; Kiwico.com/ologies More links at alieward.com/ologies/gastroegyptology Transcripts & bleeped episodes at: alieward.com/ologies-extras Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes and STIIIICKERS! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick ThorburnSupport the show: http://Patreon.com/ologiesSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  13. Fill your lungs and get ready to shout out some profane answers: it’s the Swearlusionist Swearalong Quiz! Every answer is a swear word. Swearing, as we know, is good for your health, plus helps vent stress, and you’ll learn many etymological facts along the way, so this is a very wholesome and educational quiz. CONTENT NOTE: this episode contains swears. Surprise! Find more information about the topics in this episode at theallusionist.org/swearalong. The Allusionist music is by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin’s songs at palebirdmusic.com or on Spotify, and he’s @martinaustwick on Twitter and Instagram. He also composed the music for the new kids’ science podcast Maddie’s Sound Explorers. I make two other podcasts, Veronica Mars Investigations and Answer Me This, which are soothingly escapist. The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow. This month, the Allusionist is sponsored by: • BetterHelp online licensed professional counselling. Get started today at betterhelp.com/allusionist and receive a 10% discount off your first month with the discount code ALLUSIONIST. • Bombas socks, thoughtfully engineered for comfort and durability - and for every pair of socks you buy, Bombas donates a pair to someone in need. Get twenty percent off your first purchase at Bombas.com/allusionist. • Molekule, air purification reinvented. For 10% off your first air purifier order, visit molekule.com and at checkout enter the code allusionist10. • Squarespace, your one-stop shop for creating and running a good-looking and well-working website. Go to squarespace.com/allusion for a free trial, and use the code ALLUSION to get 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain. • Progressive. See your insurance options and start a quote online at progressive.com. • Acorn TV. Allusionist listeners get a 30-day free trial at acorn.tv if you use the code allusionist.
  14. Grace Dent follows a parent-led campaign to stop Ocado from opening a new distribution depot next to a primary school in North London. Yerbury Primary School in Upper Holloway backs onto a light industrial estate. Over the past year, Ocado has been developing a distribution centre at the site. With the Covid pandemic the demand for online grocery services has risen dramatically. But this has also led to a conflict with the school and parents who believe a depot like this, adjacent to a primary school, will be detrimental to the health of the children and the local community. Grace follows the 'Nocado' campaign from its early stages, through Lockdown, and into autumn as it tries to overturn the local council's permission for Ocado to operate from the site. Producer Neil McCarthy
  15. Actor Jim Parsons feels okay about people saying that he’s Conan O’Brien’s friend.   Jim sits down with Conan to talk about recovering from COVID-19, working with dangerous animals on set, and starring in The Boys in the Band. Later, Conan makes a desperate plea to one of his sponsors.   Got a question for Conan? Call our voicemail: (323) 451-2821. For Conan videos, tour dates and more visit TeamCoco.com.
  16. In this week's episode, Matthew talks to Ross, Abby and Patrick about Democrats falling short of their goals for Texas and the latest on the race for state House speaker.
  17. On this week's TribCast, Matthew talks with Ross, Abby and Emma about the Texas GOP's response to the presidential election, the Affordable Care Act before the U.S. Supreme Court and the upcoming legislative session.
  18. What does it really take to forgive someone? And why should we do it? Our guest, psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman, tries a practice to let go of anger.
  19. After a fraught Election Week, cable news is finally cutting away from President Trump’s falsehoods. Erik Wemple, media critic for the Washington Post, explains why it might not last. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  20. When Sergio started vaping, it didn’t seem like a big deal. After all, he was surrounded by people vaping and drinking at school. But lately, this casual habit feels a lot like an addiction, and he’s not sure how to stop. This week, Sergio and Nzinga talk about what makes vaping so addictive, what to do when you feel like a party pooper, and how to stop spending the equivalent of 6 Chipotle Burrito Bowls a week on cartridges.  Please note, In Recovery contains mature themes and may not be appropriate for all listeners.  Have an addiction-related question? We want to hear from you! Call 833-4-LEMONADA (833-453-6662) or submit your question through this form:  bit.ly/inrecoveryquestions Did you know that this show is supported by listeners like you? You can become a member, get exclusive bonus content, and discounted merch at www.lemonadamedia.com/membership. To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-recovery shortly after the air date. Want to follow Dr. Harrrison? Of course you do! Find her on Twitter, IG, and FB @naharrisonmd Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  21. Because more people are working from home, employers are increasingly using software that monitors much more than just your hours on the clock.FeaturingAdam Satariano (@satariano)Pui-Wing Tam (@puiwingtam)Links to resources discussed:https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/06/technology/employee-monitoring-work-from-home-virus.html?referringSource=articleShareHost:Arielle Duhaime-Ross (@adrs), host and lead reporter of ResetAbout Recode by Vox:Recode by Vox helps you understand how tech is changing the world — and changing us. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
  22. Have you ever had a job where you had to stop and ask yourself: what am I doing here? If I quit tomorrow, would anyone even notice? This week on Hidden Brain, we talk with anthropologist David Graeber about the rise of what he calls "bullshit jobs," and how these positions affect the people who hold them.
  23. AI is coming...to make you better. Byron Reese has been thinking about and observing technology for a long time. He says as long as we keep learning, we never need to worry about losing jobs, especially if you are a plumber. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  1. November 15-21

  2. How did we get to a place where life's become an endless treadmill of work? In her latest book, Can't Even: How Millennials Became the Burnout Generation, Anne Helen Petersen tackles this question. Her book is for anyone who feels their life has become an endless to-do list. In particular, Petersen describes the plight of today's millennials, a generation she believes is under constant pressure to perform. She explains how, for many millennials, it begins in childhood, when activities originally intended for fun get repurposed for resume building. She argues, "You're taking things that are meant to be leisure, that are meant to be those joyful corners of your life that are not work, and you're turning them into work." Petersen discusses the social and economic forces that have led to this cultural shift, including the demise of labor unions, increasing reliance on contract workers, and the rise of the gig economy. In each case, she points out how companies benefit, while workers struggle to make ends meet. At the same time, she wonders if millennials are the generation that can break the cycle. She muses, "I'm curious if we can refigure our relationship to work. I am curious if millennials are broken, if we are just too far down this road, or if we can take a different road." Anne Helen Petersen is a senior culture writer for BuzzFeed. A former academic, she received a Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin, where she focused on the history of celebrity gossip. Her previous books, Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud and Scandals of Classic Hollywood, were featured on NPR, Elle, and The Atlantic. Curious Minds Team Learn more about creator and host, Gayle Allen, and producer and editor, Rob Mancabelli, here. Episode Links The Remix: How to Lead and Succeed in the Multigenerational Workplace by Lindsey Pollak How Millennials Became the Burnout Generation by Anne Helen Petersen Annette Lareau Temp: How American Work, American Business, and the American Dream Became Temporary by Louis Hyman The Fissured Workplace: Why Work Became So Bad for So Many and What Can be Done to Improve It by David Weil The Effects of 'Clopening' on Employees: What Employers Can Do by Tom Starner Are You Just LARPing Your Job by John Herrman How Does Your Ugly Garden Grow? by Anne Helen Petersen Ways to Support the Podcast If you're a fan of the show, there are three simple things you can do to support our work: Rate and review the podcast on iTunes or wherever you subscribe. In the next week, tell one person about the show. Subscribe so you never miss an episode. Where to Find Curious Minds Spotify iTunes Tunein Stitcher Google Podcasts Overcast
  3. As a kid, Olga loved writing and developed a passion for journalism. But her parents, immigrants from the former U.S.S.R., strongly opposed her choices, fearing the financial prospects were slim. Long-standing arguments created a rift in their relationship that grew worse over time—leading her to choose between her calling and her family.  In this episode, Juleyka also speaks with a career coach about how feminist women can negotiate and find common ground with our parents. Our expert this week is Cynthia Pong, a feminist career coach for women of color. You can visit her website here and learn about her book here. If you loved this episode, be sure to check out She Loves Her Work, Her Parents Don't Get It and Struggling to Become More than a Dutiful Daughter.We’d love to hear your stories of triumph and frustration so send us a detailed voice memo to hello@talktomamipapi.com. You might be on a future episode! Let’s connect on Twitter and Instagram at @TalkToMamiPapi and email us at hello@talktomamipapi.com. And subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts.
  4. We. Are. Back. It's been a helluva few months. And Mash-Ups, we missed you! So. We're back for our usual blend of group therapy, belly laughs, tears, and side eye as we explore what makes us American today. And for this special preview episode of our new season, we're tackling that very important question: What is your bubbemeise? Visit mashupamericans.com for more!
  5. In Episode 4, "To Raise a Child," meet Patrice, a Jamaican-American, who navigates raising her two daughters alongside her husband, all while coming to grips with the complexities of her own, unique identity. The Round Table crew shows how parenting and sacrifice shapes them, plus Perrine and Skye share tales of being raised by their Liberian parents. Make sure to tell us about the effect parenting had on you. Leave comments and interact with us on social media! We're @1stgens on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. And don't forget to rate us, leave us a review and subscribe where ever you listen to your podcasts. For more information on Patrice's upcoming book: www.patricegopo.com For extra content, check out our website: www.1stgenspodcast.com Full musical composition by Nick Stubblefield: www.nickstubblefield.com
  6. Nzinga often talks about how we’re all addicted to something. For Nora McInerny, host of the podcast, Terrible Thanks For Asking, it’s reading the negative things strangers say about her online. Whether it’s the comments section, Amazon reviews, or the depths of Reddit, Nora seeks it out. So Nzinga and Nora talk about the root cause, the benefits, and how Nora can find what she’s looking for elsewhere. Please note, In Recovery contains mature themes and may not be appropriate for all listeners.    For great term life insurance, check out havenlife.com Haven Term is a Term Life Insurance Policy (ICC17DTC) issued by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual), Springfield, MA 01111 and offered exclusively through Haven Life Insurance Agency, LLC. Policy and rider form numbers and features may vary by state and not be available in all states. Our Agency license number in California is 0K71922 and in Arkansas, 100139527. For 20% off CryoFreeze CBD Pain Relief Roll-On or other OMAX Health products, go to Omaxhealth.com and enter code INRECOVERY.  Get all inclusive virtual membership to the Jane Club a www.janeclub.com and enter code INSIDER JANE FF Listen to Nzinga on Nora’s podcast! Have an addiction-related question? We want to hear from you! Call 833-4-LEMONADA (833-453-6662) or submit your question through this form:  bit.ly/inrecoveryquestions Did you know that this show is supported by listeners like you? You can become a member, get exclusive bonus content, and discounted merch at www.lemonadamedia.com/membership. To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-recovery shortly after the air date. Want to follow Dr. Harrrison? Of course you do! Find her on Twitter, IG, and FB @naharrisonmdSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  7. Lately, it seems like we are looking for answers everywhere about everything. Luckily, Nzinga is here to answer more listener questions about all things addiction. One man wants to know how he and his partner can find healthier coping mechanisms, especially in the wake of election stress. Another woman asks how she can use her own addiction experience as a cautionary tale for her 11-year-old brother who’s fascinated with drugs. And, a pharmacist is looking for resources she can provide for clients who may be facing addiction. Nzinga answers these questions, and a range of others, in the second “Ask Me Anything” episode. Please note, In Recovery contains mature themes and may not be appropriate for all listeners.  Have an addiction-related question? We want to hear from you! Call 833-4-LEMONADA (833-453-6662) or submit your question through this form:  bit.ly/inrecoveryquestions Did you know that this show is supported by listeners like you? You can become a member, get exclusive bonus content, and discounted merch at www.lemonadamedia.com/membership. Other resources mentioned in the show:  www.thehotline.org or call 800-799-7233  Alcohol Use Disorder Diagnostic Criteria PAWS: Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome www.wethevillage.co https://www.eleanorhealth.com/ To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-recovery shortly after the air date. Want to follow Dr. Harrrison? Of course you do! Find her on Twitter, IG, and FB @naharrisonmd Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  8. Overdose deaths from methamphetamine use have been surging in the US, not unlike opioids. But meth isn’t talked about as much. In this episode, Nzinga brings on Eleanor Health Clinic Manager Jack Register to talk about why meth has been prominent in certain communities and why there is less publicity over the rise in numbers. Plus, Nzinga lays the groundwork on how meth impacts our brains, behaviors, and bodies.  Please note, In Recovery contains mature themes and may not be appropriate for all listeners.  Have an addiction-related question? We want to hear from you! Call 833-4-LEMONADA (833-453-6662) or submit your question through this form:  bit.ly/inrecoveryquestions Did you know that this show is supported by listeners like you? You can become a member, get exclusive bonus content, and discounted merch at www.lemonadamedia.com/membership. To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-recovery shortly after the air date. Want to follow Dr. Harrrison? Of course you do! Find her on Twitter, IG, and FB @naharrisonmd Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  9. If you are curious about how life’s relationships affect your mental health, tune in to this episode of ON Purpose to hear Lori Gottlieb, psychiatrist and author, and Jay Shetty share wisdom on mental health and relationships. Check out the full episode to learn more about the dangers of negative self-talk, how the influence of the people you surround yourself affects you daily, when you should seek therapy, and misconceptions surrounding mental health.
  10. A 4th grader smuggles candy into the house and then sells it to her younger brother -- with, of course, a giant markup. Ooh You’re In Trouble is a proud member of TRAX from PRX. Find us @ listentotrouble.
  11. They don’t get a lot of attention, but seniors are the most at risk to die by suicide. In 2014, Marguerite Reynolds lost her fiercely independent mother to suicide after a cornea injury left her feeling burdensome and debilitated. This week, we hear her story and are joined by professor and researcher, Yeates Conwell, who unpacks “The Four D’s” that put seniors at an increased risk for suicide. And Stephanie has an uncomfortable - but very important - conversation with her dad. Season 2 of Last Day is created in partnership with The Jed Foundation. The Jed Foundation (JED) empowers teens and young adults with the skills and support to grow into healthy, thriving adults. You can find tips, tools and resources for taking care of your emotional health available at: www.jedcares.org/lastday Resources from the episode: Keep up with the University of Rochester’s Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide here. To learn more about recommendations for reporting on suicide, visit https://reportingonsuicide.org/. If you or someone you know is struggling emotionally or feeling hopeless, it’s important to talk to someone about it now. Contact one of the resources below for a free, confidential conversation with a trained counselor anytime.  National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 Crisis Text line: Text “Connect” to 741-741 The Trevor Project: 1-866-488-7386 To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to https://www.lemonadamedia.com/show/last-day shortly after the air date. Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
  12. Juleyka Lantigua-Williams:Hi, everybody. Welcome back to How to Talk to [Mamí and Papí] About Anything. I’m Juleyka Lantigua-Williams. Hi, new listeners. Today I’m speaking with author Cris Ramos Greene. She just published a memoir called Embrace That Girl about navigating adulthood, searching for meaning, and coming to terms with her identity as a second generation Cuban American. Spot on for our show. Cris grew up in a tight knit Cuban household in Miami, but she had difficulty asserting herself and her independence in important areas of her life, like dating and moving in with her boyfriend. Oh boy. Let’s get into it. Cris: Hi, my name is Cris, and I’m the author of Embrace That Girl, and in my family we grew up calling my parents mom and dad. I grew up in Miami, Florida. Both my parents were born in Cuba. My mom was raised in Spain and immigrated when she was about 14. My dad immigrated when he was a toddler. So, we definitely grew up speaking Spanglish. I’m the older sister, I have a younger sister, and it was just us four, and both of my parents are actually only children, so we were like cuatro gatos. So, when I started dating and specifically in my teenage years, me and my dad would butt heads, like we would get into screaming matches over 15-minute increments on my curfew. He was extremely overprotective. It was really hard, especially because we were so tight knit, because it’s just us four. Being a family to my parents meant that everyone had sort of like a vote in everyone’s decisions, so being a family meant sharing these things and having basically… I don’t know. Everything was just very enmeshed. Not a lot of boundaries. And when my dad and I got into these fights over me wanting to be independent, my comeback was, “I’m 18. I’m an adult now.” He would be like, “eso es una americanada.” Like, “No. You’re not.” So, telling my dad that I had made this grownup decision to move in with my boyfriend, I was so nervous. I basically avoided it, like I told my mom, and she wasn’t happy, and in our family the dynamic, which I think is just very Latin, is that my dad blew up at me. He wouldn’t talk to me. My mom wanted to keep the peace, but she definitely, lo soltó, in conversations, and it was really tough. It was not an easy situation to navigate. I did not try to persuade them because I felt like I had struggled from my teenage years, my early twenties, to assert my independence, and everything felt like it was a negotiation or an enrollment, so by 25, I had already been living in my own apartment. I was financially independent. I felt that this was more of an information, but I didn’t want to be callous about it, because I care about my parents and I really wanted them to love my boyfriend, because I knew he would be eventually my forever partner, so I was really careful in how I informed them that it was definitely a debrief. Not a, “We’re at the table and you have a vote,” which definitely didn’t work out well, because in my family the dynamic is we share in the decision making. We all have a vote. We all consult each other before we pull the trigger. And so that, I think in and of itself, besides the fact that it was very sensitive because they’re traditional and I wasn’t married, felt like a betrayal, I think, which I really hated. It was hard. Shortly after I bought an apartment with my husband, we still weren’t married at the time or engaged, and we… I shared with my parents like, “Oh, I put an offer on this amazing place.” And at that point they weren’t mad and enraged like I think they were originally, because they understood, “Oh, there’s a shift in the dynamic.” But I can tell they were hurt because they were like, “Wait, but why didn’t you show it to me?” And I didn’t even think of showing it to them, you know? I was like, “Well, because you’re not gonna live here.” And I think after that, they didn’t get angry with me the same way. They were just more hurt that, “Wow, like this really means she’s in her own family or her own situation now. We don’t get consulted. We’re not the cuatro gatos anymore.” My sister is definitely, as a younger sibling, didn’t have to fight for the same things. Grew up, basically saw me fight for my independence. My parents were definitely like, “Okay, fine,” when it came to her. Like my sister now lives with her fiancé, almost husband, and my parents helped them move in. It wasn’t even… I know, it’s so unfair! Yeah, it really is. Although they’ve come a long way in respecting my boundaries, and I’ve come a long way too in communicating with them and learning to let them in and share in a way that still makes it clear that this is sharing, but it still creeps up from time to time. I just kind of lovingly… I accept that they’re my parents. They’re always gonna want the best for me, like I know it doesn’t come from a place of judgment. It’s just they don’t know how to say it in a different way and the approach is always to come from a space of love, and compassion, and understanding of this is what family means to them and be gentle in your approach. Ad: How to Talk to [Mamí and Papí] About Anything is brought to you by First Republic Bank. As your focus turns to what matters most to you and your community, First Republic remains committed to offering personalized financial solutions that fit your needs. From day one, a dedicated banker will be there to listen to you and understand your unique values and goals. Because now more than ever, what matters to you matters most. Learn more at FirstRepublic.com. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. Lantigua-Williams:I can relate to Cris’s story in so many ways. I also had to tell my mom that I was moving in with my boyfriend in my mid-twenties. I’m also the oldest daughter. I also have younger sisters. And like her, I’ve also been the first to make big changes happen in our family. First to go away to college, first to live abroad, lots and lots of firsts. Like Cris, I also had to figure out how to communicate those important decisions in my life while keeping the peace and safeguarding the environment for my siblings, my sisters, and my brother, who would eventually also face big, life-affirming decisions. But with my mom, even when we were not talking about taboo subjects like dating, it still got messy. And so, it got me thinking about Cris’s scenario and my scenario and so many of our scenarios in which these big, big, big, big, big life decisions can sometimes feel like dropping a bomb on the dinner table. So, I called in an expert. Sara Stanizai: My name is Sara Stanizai. I’m a licensed marriage and family therapist and I’m the owner of Prospect Therapy here in Long Beach, California. We are a queer and trans affirming therapy practice with a special focus on mental health in first generation American and other bicultural communities. Lantigua-Williams:So, you’re my expert today, Sara. You heard Cris’s story. What do you hear?Stanizai: I love hearing Cris’s story. I hear stories like this often and I’m gonna be very on brand and as a marriage and family therapist, one of the things I heard was she talked about in her family, everyone plays a role and that’s what we look at when we look at a family system or any sort of relationship system, is what role does everyone play, and it may seem obvious to us now looking back on it, but people don’t realize that we often reenact those roles in our new families, and in the relationships that we create as adults. Lantigua-Williams:So, Cris was very aware of how exactly she changed the dynamic when she informed them that she was gonna move in with her boyfriend, so she says that they were shocked because this was not a, “Let’s have a vote. Let’s have a family discussion.” This was, “Here’s what my plan is, you have now been informed.” So, walk me through what happens in the family when a key player like the oldest daughter decides to drastically change the dynamic about such a major decision. Stanizai: Yes. I love the oldest daughter who changes the dynamic. I may have some personal experience with that. I’m teasing, but it could be anyone. What happens is that system I just described gets disrupted. We don’t live in a vacuum, and so when something comes from outside like a new partner, or a new job, or a goal that doesn’t align with “how we’ve always done things,” that person has the role of disrupting that system, and that doesn’t have to necessarily be a bad thing. I think one thing I tell my clients a lot is you can cloak informing them in a way that sounds like you’re asking them or getting their buy in, and people sometimes have a hard time with that. They say, “Well, I should just… I need to stand up for myself. Enough is enough. It’s not fair. They need to know how I feel.” Which is true, but when you are trying to essentially disrupt a pattern that has been there for a long time, you’re gonna make it harder for yourself the harder you stand up against them. And I often tell clients it’s probably safer and easier to sound like you’re asking them and have them think it’s their idea and you can then more safely disrupt that pattern. You can meet your goal. For example, for Cris, she can move out. And then there’s plenty of time afterwards to practice informing them and separate yourself little by little over time, rather than feeling like it has to be this big battle and you have to prove something. Lantigua-Williams:Besides cloaking, is there another strategy or a couple of other strategies that people can utilize to reduce the potential harm and the potential blowup while still achieving the goal that they want to achieve? Stanizai: Yeah. So, there’s a couple ways. One is to relate it back to your values and your beliefs that you probably do share a lot with your family if you dig deep enough. Sometimes, these manifest in different ways, and they might feel controlling, or stifling, but if you go deep enough, the values are, “I just want you to be safe. I want you to be happy.” If you remind them, “Well, if you want me to be safe, this is how I’m gonna meet that need. You raised me right. I love you. I’m smart. I can figure this out. Maybe it’s not what you intended, but trust me, I’m not doing this just to rebel. I’m not doing this to get away from the values that you taught me. This is just the way that I’m meeting them.” But the other way that I tell people is you can still involve them in the process, and I imagined the rest of Cris’s story, which was she informed her parents that she’s moving out and then I imagined it’s okay, they can still be involved. Maybe the parents want to help decorate the new place, or maybe you want to invite them over for a meal so they can see it’s not a terrible situation. If the parents want to help with the purchase or negotiation, they probably have skills in that area, so they can still be involved and still feel like the collective unit is still taking part in this decision, so that Cris feels more supported and the parents don’t feel so betrayed. Lantigua-Williams:So, Cris did not escape the guilt. She says that making those big decisions independently of her family sometimes felt like a betrayal. How can we manage that guilt, even when we are making absolutely the best decisions for us? Stanizai: Yeah. That’s something that’s very, very common in first gens, where it feels like a betrayal because this is how we’ve always made decisions and here I am changing sort of what we agreed on. One thing I say a lot about immigrant communities, a lot of us come from much more collectivist cultures, and that’s this idea that in America, it’s very focused on the individual and the greatest virtue you can have is you do your best. And in a lot of other cultures, especially where people are immigrating from, it’s a much more collectivist culture, meaning we put the needs of the family, or the group, or the unit at the priority. What I love about these collectivist cultures is it reminds me that immigrants and children of immigrants, we do this better than anyone else, and I think sometimes people who don’t come from those cultures don’t understand it and frankly, they’re missing out. We know that collectivism can be a little bit frustrating and annoying, because it feels like everyone’s in your business and I can’t make any decisions by myself ever. There has to be a vote on what I have for breakfast. But if we can leverage this, because we do this better than anyone else, we know what it’s like to have a whole group of people who are loyal to us, and who will protect us, and who will back us up, and if we can simply shift that so that they’re supporting us rather than making it feel like they’re holding us down, or holding us back, and if we can reframe it in that way, usually by getting more in touch with our values or really just saying these are the lessons my family taught me. This is what I’m grateful for. This is what I appreciate. That’s sort of an advantage to us. That’s something that we do that other people can’t do. Lantigua-Williams:So, this is a perfect place to talk about something that I also experienced as a hard wall, which was traditionally, Americans declare their independence at 18 and it is culturally understood in the United States that you’re an adult. And that’s not so much the case in immigrant households. 18 doesn’t mean squat. How does someone, and I think Cris navigated it well, but how does someone who’s 18, or 28, navigate that really stark line between the culture that we’re coming from and the American culture that we’re growing into? Stanizai: I think every family, and larger than that, every culture has these markers of which box do you check and does that mean you’re successful? Does that mean you’re happy? Does that even mean that you are an adult and can make decisions independently? So, maybe in our family, it’s not turning 18. Maybe it is getting married. Maybe it’s having a child. Maybe it’s completing your education, or once you are financially able to provide for yourself, that counts as adulthood and that can happen at any age. So, focusing on those rather than being fixated just on the date on the calendar. Lantigua-Williams:So, my last question, one of the things that I really related to with Cris as the oldest sister is that she’s also paving the way for her younger sister much in the way that I did. You know, like I went away to college four and a half hours a way, and that enabled my other siblings to do the same, and I think that this is also an important role that the first gen kid plays in the household. What is your advice in general when we are doing these sort of barrier-breaking things in our families? In terms of thinking about how they impact our siblings who are coming up behind us. Stanizai: Yeah. I have a younger sister too, so this part of the story really warmed my heart, and the oldest sibling in many ways plays the role of the American parent, so we know a little bit more about how to navigate that. And I think any younger sibling would say just because you did that didn’t make it easier for me. Lantigua-Williams:Yep. Stanizai: But I think the distinction is they may not be fighting for the same things. For example, if the older sibling is the first to marry someone outside of the culture, or the first to move away for school, the younger sibling may know that that is okay to do, but then they have their own issues of what they’re fighting for, which is usually some version of, “I just want to be taken seriously. I don’t want to be the baby anymore.” I feel like I’m putting my sister on blast. It’s cool. But I think if the oldest sibling can be mindful that they do, whether they want to or not, end up playing that sort of parental role, and to have a little bit more empathy and learn to tolerate that frustration, that can not only pave the way for the younger sibling, but honestly, I think it strengthens the siblings’ relationship, too. Lantigua-Williams:Sara, thank you so much. So good to have you back on the show. Stanizai: Thank you. Thanks for having me. This was really fun. Lantigua-Williams:All right, let’s recap what we learned from Sara. Skip the confrontation entirely. Cloak your language with friendly and conciliatory words instead of grandstanding with declarations of independence. Keep them involved. Your parents don’t have to be part of the decision-making process. Letting them be part of the aftermath can go a long way in honoring your relationship and maintaining boundaries. And remember, use the collective framing to show them that what they’ve taught you in terms of values is still very much reflected in the decisions that you’re making. It’s not about asserting your independence and it’s not about separating. It is really about exercising the same values in your own way, in your own life. Lantigua-Williams: Thank you for listening. Thank you for sharing us. Thank you for following us. Thank you for tweeting at us. All the thank yous. How to Talk to [Mamí and Papí] About Anything is an original production of Lantigua Williams & Co. Virginia Lora produced this episode. Michael Castañeda mixed it. Production help from Kat Hernandez. Micaela Rodríguez is our founding producer and social media editor. Cedric Wilson is our lead producer. I’m the show’s creator, Juleyka Lantigua-Williams. On Twitter and Instagram, we’re @TalktoMamiPapi. Please subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Spotify, or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts. Bye, everybody. Same place next week. CITATION: Lantigua-Williams, Juleyka, host. “Telling Them I'm Moving in with Boyfriend.” How to Talk to [Mamí & Papí] About Anything, Lantigua Williams & Co., October 11, 2020. TalkToMamiPapi.com.
  13. Actor and comedian Kevin Hart feels extremely blessed about being Conan O’Brien's friend. Kevin sits down with Conan to talk about the importance of taking care of the body, molding an environment for future success stories, and walking in fear at the highest levels of achievement. Later, Conan doubles down on one of his most hilarious jokes.   Got a question for Conan? Call our voicemail: (323) 451-2821. For Conan videos, tour dates and more visit TeamCoco.com.
  14. Every song Cyndi Lauper writes is pop perfection according to Sam Sanders, host of NPR’s “It’s Been A Minute.” Many fall for “Girls Just Want To Have Fun,” but Sanders's favorite song is the slow burner “All Through The Night,” save for one moment: the synthesizer solo. For Sanders, this solo never fit in. Charlie investigates the source of his musical malady and uncovers how the 80s got its groove. Songs DiscussedCyndi Lauper - Girls Just Want To Have FunCyndi Lauper - Time After TimeCyndi Lauper - She BopCyndi Lauper - All Through the NightJanet Jackson - When I Think Of YouJanet Jackson - The Pleasure PrincipleJanet Jackson - NastyKenny Loggins - Danger ZoneWhitney Houston - Greatest Love Of AllQueen - Who Wants To Live ForeverTina Turner - What's Love Got To Do With ItCyndi Lauper - Change Of HeartPhil Collins - In The Air TonightKim Carnes - Bette Davis EyesTom Petty - You Got LuckyCars - Lets GoTalking Heads - Burning Down The HouseParliament Funkadelic - Atomic DogThe Weeknd - Blinding LightsDua Lipa - PhysicalLittle Mix - Break Up SongMiley Cyrus - Heart of Glass (Blondie Cover)MoreRead Dr. Megan L. Lavengood's research on the DX7: https://meganlavengood.com/research/Listen to Dave Smith's (recently re-released) Sequential Prophet 5 synthesizer: https://www.sequential.com/product/prophet-5/Learn about William Wittman's production credits on Discogs: https://www.discogs.com/artist/170639-William-Wittman Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices