The James Altucher Show Podcast

The James Altucher Show

An Education, Business and Careers podcast featuring James Altucher
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Ep. 216 - Yuval Noah Harari: A Brief History of The Future
My ancestor from 70,000 years ago was smarter than me. He knew every plant, mushroom, animal, predator, prey in a several mile radius. He knew how to make weapons. He knew how to capture something, make it edible. I can barely order delivery. And as far as weapons, they say “the pen is mightier than the sword” but I don’t think a tweet is. My ancestor also knew how to adapt to new terrains, how to handle strangers who could be threats, how to learn who to trust and who not to trust. I wish I had his skills. Not only that. Archaeological evidence says his brain was bigger than mine. And bigger is better. To make things worse, another animal made the entire human race its slave. Wheat domesticated us. It forced us to stick around for the harvest, horde up for years when the harvest might be bad, go from a life of a diverse diet to basically all carbs all the time. And it turned us from hunters to farmers. But it’s not all bad. And the news is actually very good. Probably the books I’ve recommended most in the past five years was “Sapiens” by Yuval Harari. And not only me: it’s Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg’s top recommendation. And now Yuval has a new book, “Homo Deus” – i.e. where are humans heading? If Sapiens explored the last 70,000 years of human history, “Homo Deus” takes the trends into the future. What will happen next? The answers are fascinating. And I had even more questions. I couldn’t believe I was finally talking to Yuval after reading “Sapiens” so many times and recommending it on every list and giving the book to all of my friends. And then finally reading “Homo Deus“. What made humans the only animal to spread across the entire globe? What was special about us? How did we go hundreds of miles into empty water to find Australia for instance? I would never take that risk! And then survive and flourish in a completely new ecosystem, just like we did in North America. “Fiction,” Yuval told me, and describes in his book. “We created elaborate fictions for ourselves: ‘nations’, ‘corporations’, ‘religion’, ‘crusades’, and perhaps the most successful fiction: ‘money’. So I could use a dollar and some stranger in China can use a dollar and we can trust each other enough to do a transaction.” So what’s next? “Homo sapiens are going to evolve again.” Yuval said, “Technology is taking us there and technology is evolving much faster than we are.” I still can’t believe I spoke to him. Five years ago I took his course on Coursera. I was thinking, “how did this guy get so smart?” And now I was talking to him. And, like I said, the news was not bad. Here’s what I learned: 1. The economy needs you to invest in yourself “There’s a change in the nature of the economy from a material based economy to a knowledge-based economy. The main assets in the past were material like gold minds or wheat fields,” Yuval said. “These are the types of things you can conquer through violence.” That’s how we got California. The US invaded and absorbed their wealth. But you can’t invade and absorb knowledge. China isn’t going to take over Silicon Valley and absorb all the wealth. “Today, the main asset is knowledge,” he said. The only good investment you can make for your future is the investment you make in yourself today. Hone your idea muscle, build a network and a library of mentors, make a commitment to do one healthy thing a day. Because the health of your body impacts the health of your brain. I try to improve 1% a day. That’s it. That’s how I invest in myself. 2. Explore Internal realities vs. External realities Resources today are different. They’re abstract. Yuval said, “The source of wealth in California today is knowledge, in the mind’s of engineers and technicians and CEOs. And you just cannot conquer it by force.” That’s one of the reason’s why Yuval says, “You see a decline in international violence.” The other reason: weapons are too powerful. “Nuclear weapons have transformed war between superpowers,” he said. War today is “collective suicide, which is why we don’t have such wars since 1945.” Terrorism is different. Their weapon is fear. Yuval calls it “psychological menace.” But he’s really concerned about them in our future. “Terrorists function by capturing our imagination, turning our imagination against us, and causing us to overreact,” he said. “In a way, a terrorist is like a fly that tries to destroy a china shop. The fly is so small and weak. It cannot move even a single teacup. So how does a fly destroy a china shop? The fly finds a bull, gets into the ear of the bull and starts buzzing. The bull becomes so enraged that it loses its temper and destroys the china shop. This is what happened in the middle east over the last 15 years,” Yuval said. “Al-Qaeda could never destroy Iraq by itself. It got into the ear of the United States and the United States went wild and destroyed the middle eastern china shop for Al-Qaeda. This is how terrorism functions. And if you want to fight terrorism you should start with your own imagination.” For me, this means understanding that ideas are currency. Becoming an idea machine, writing ten ideas a day, so you get the new ‘weapons’ of Sapiens, is the key. 3. We’re going from “humanists” to “data-ists” In 500 years we might not be dealing with humans at all. Look at Amazon for example. They tell us what to buy. We don’t ask our friends. We ask data. “Given the advances of bioengineering, brain-computer interfaces and so forth, I think it’s very likely that within a century or two homo sapiens will disappear and be replaced by a completely different kind of being,” Yuval said. He says bioengineering is just one possibility. Another is we start connecting brains and computers to create cyborgs. This isn’t science fiction. It’s already happening. I’m sort of scared and sort of excited. We went from tribes to villages to cities to kingdoms to empires to “isms” to…data that will unite us. The next step in our evolution. The final frontier.
Ep. 196 - Tim Ferriss: [Part 1] Becoming a Titan & Overcoming Your Worst Weakness
I was very late and I was very upset at myself. I had flown three thousand miles. I moved into an Airbnb right next to where Tim was staying. I had written thousands of notes on ripped pieces of paper and stuck them all throughout the book. I had notes written up and around all the margins. I listened to dozens of his podcasts. And I've known him for years. All morning I had jotted down possible questions. And I was late to meet Tim for our podcast. Because the west coast is three hours a way in time travel from the east coast. That's how stupid I am. I rushed over and he was waiting. Tim follows his own advice. He was relaxed. No problems. I apologized, we spoke for awhile, and then started the podcast. Three hours later...not even close to done but we stopped. I want to be a better person in life. I want to be healthier. I want to be more creative. I want to find what is hidden inside of me, dig around, unleash it. I want to find the strength to do that. It's not an easy to thing to do. To scrape the dirt and dust that collects inside of ourselves. To explore. To wander. To create. Tim's book, "Tools of the Titans" is a guidebook for doing the above. And I had a lot of questions. ---- A few months after I started my podcast in 2014, Tim wrote me and said, "Can I call you and ask you some questions about podcasting". I said sure and he called and we talked for quite awhile. He called many podcasters during this period. Then he started his own podcast. He DOMINATED. All of his guests were amazing. He told me he was getting so much great advice from his guests it was overwhelming. The aftermath of a hailstorm where everything is just glowing and even the air you breathe seems cleansed. But that lasts only a short time until the atmosphere is filled with the everyday pollution of life. So he took a month off, re-listened to all his podcasts, and just for his own use he wrote down the advice he was hearing. "But it was too much," he told me. "I kept writing. It was clearly a book." It's not like any other book he's written. He steps out of the way in many cases, and let's these super-achievers do the talking. He curates their thoughts. They had found the hidden gems inside themselves, and long ago brought them up to share with the world to achieve their successes, and now they documented them with Tim. That's why I flew 3000 miles. I wanted the gems. I wanted answers. ---- I've had so many ups and downs I try to quantify what works on the way up. What goes wrong on the way down. I try to quantify: what are the steps for reinvention? I wonder: what makes someone break out of mediocrity? About seven months ago I threw out all of my belongings. I gave away or donated to the library about 3000 books. All of my books now are on my kindle. None of the answers were in my things. But now I have one physical book. Tim's. And I plan to keep it. Here are ten things (among many) I learned from the book and from our podcast: "ALL I HAVE TO DO IS SHOW UP" I'm impressed how Tim did his work before starting a podcast. Starting something new is not about taking risks. Jumping into the unknown, getting out of the comfort zone, doing something scary. It's not about bravery. It's the exact opposite. You can only do so many "new" things in life. So do the work beforehand. He called people up. He learned the craft as much as he could. He talked to people ranging from me to people at Apple. He had initial guests lined up. He had a huge launch. And he told me the other day that he is persistent at getting his guests. One recent guest, he told me, took two years to book. Which was refreshing for me to hear since it often takes me that long or longer to book many guests. Comedian Whitney Cummings told him: "My work is not done on the night of a big standup special. My work was done three months ago. All I have do is show up." Even though I was late for our podcast, I'm glad I showed up. - DOING IS EVERYTHING Derek Sivers told him, "If all we needed was more information, then everyone would be a billionaire with perfect abs." It's the DOING that's difficult. I asked Tim: "there's 700 pages of advice here. How can anyone follow everything? How do you know what will work for you?" Just pick a few things. Pick what resonates with you. Start slowly. It doesn't matter what you do. Just start DO-ing. Dan Ariely once told me something similar. "If you say sorry to someone, even if you don't mean it, even if THEY KNOW you don't mean it, then you still have a better relationship with them a year later compared with people who never say sorry." DOING > THINKING. - BLEED From Morgan Spurlock, the director of "Supersize Me" and many other great documentaries. "Don't be afraid to show your scars". This is not a book about suicide. But Tim shares the time he was considering it. This is not a book about anxiety or depression. But Tim shares his battles with those demons. This book is not just a book of advice, it's a book of Tim's own journey as he tries to make his life better. In the section with Tony Robbins, Tony talks about how he wakes up every morning and writes about what he is anxious about. I find this is very helpful. Instead of complaining to the outside world, you reveal to your inside world what it is you are scared of. When I was talking to Susan David in another podcast, she told me how if you write down your vulnerabilities just ONCE for 20 minutes, then even up to six months later the experimental group showed less signs of stress than the control group. Be vulnerable, write down three anxieties a day. I can't be true to others if I'm not true to myself. - MORNING PAGES Julia Cameron writes about this in the classic book, "The Artists Way". Brian Koppelman, writer of Rounders, Ocean's 13, Billions, etc swears by this technique for increasing his creativity. Many of Tim's guests say the same thing. What are morning pages? Sit down in the morning, write in longhand three pages of garbage without stopping. This uncages the anxious "monkey mind" and puts it on the page. It unleashes any writer's block because you have permission to write total nonsense. It frees the mind for the creativity it needs to do that day. - THE DOUBLE THREAT GUIDE TO BEING SUCCESSFUL When Tim spoke to Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert, Scott told him: "I always advise young people to become good public speakers". Anyone can do that, he says, with practice. "Suddenly you're in charge or maybe you are starting your own company. Capitalism rewards things that are both rare and valuable." If you are good at public speaking and one other skill, you make yourself more rare and valuable. Before Warren Buffett made one dime of money, he took a Dale Carnegie course on public speaking. After that, he made a dime of money. Or two. - DON'T BE AFRAID TO DO SOMETHING YOU'RE NOT QUALIFIED TO DO Dan Carlin, host of the super-podcast "Hardcore History" told Tim this. Dan was not a historian, didn't have a PhD, but was fascinated by history. His mother(!) told him, "why don't you do a podcast about the stories you tell here at the dinner table." He told his mother, but I don't have a doctorate." His mother said, "I didn't realize you had to have a doctorate to tell stories". And now he has the most popular history-based podcast on the planet. Kamal Ravikant, a past and future guest on my own podcast, told Tim, "If I only did things I was qualified for I'd be pushing a broom somewhere." Schools, corporations, government, parents, friends, want to put you in their own boxes. They have a menu for you, with only very limited choices today. But if you don't choose your own themes in life, then someone else will do the choosing for you and the results won't be as good. - THE THOUSAND TRUE FAN THEORY....EXPANDED Kevin Kelly tells tim, "Success need not be complicated. Just start with making 1000 people extremely extremely happy," Three ideas from this: Kevin's idea is that if they are true super fans, you will be able to build a product, charge for it, and they will pay, making you a living. Build a product that makes their lives better. Second idea: Have direct contact with your fans. This gets rid of all the middlemen and turns your relationships into a tribe. Third idea: Not every fan is a super fan. But the super fans will help you communicate with the other people who would be receptive to your message. The key here being: have an important and unique message. One that helps people. One that is a vision that people can believe in. Start small. Focus on the people who really care about what you are doing. As Seth Godin even says, "Find Ten" if you have to. Because if t's a good idea then ten will tell ten who will tell ten. Book recommendation from this chapter: "Small Giants" by Bo Burlingham, about companies that choose to be the best rather than the biggest. - ASK DUMB QUESTIONS This is a common theme throughout the book. Tony Robbins tells Tim, "We are the quality of the questions we ask." And both Alex Blumberg (super podcaster) and Malcolm Gladwell talk about the importance of asking dumb questions. People sometimes criticize me for interrupting guests on my podcasts. I get it. But the reality is: if I don't understand something during the podcast, then when else will I get the chance to understand. Alex Blumberg gives some good ways to start dumb questions: "Tell me about a time when..." "Tell me about the day when..." "What were the exact steps that got you to...." "Describe the conversation when..." And then with a follow up to any answer like, "How did that make you feel?" -- NO COMPLAINING Tracey DiNunzio told Tim a great line which I underlined twice in the book: "When you complain, NOBODY wants to help you": If you only focus what is wrong, then you will bring the people around you down. Be a source of growth for the people around you, so that they can become a source of growth for you. It's the "Honda" theory. If you just bought a Honda, you will suddenly see Hondas all over the road. If all you do is complain, you will only see the scarcity everywhere. And the abundance will leave you in the dust. - DON'T BELIEVE IN ALL THE SELF-HELP BOOKS This is not quite what was said, but this is my personal takeaway. BJ Novak, a writer from "The Office" for it's entire run and a successful comedian told Tim, "I read the book Daily Rituals and I am demoralized by how many great people start their day early." Instead, BJ spends several hours getting in a good mood. Walking, playing, fooling around, reading newspapers, etc. Getting in a good mood was the surest way to get creative ideas. He takes his own path. BJ's podcast recommendation: "Intelligence Squared". Oh! VERY important lesson from Novak. I'm always stressed that I need to publish every day. I even asked Ice T once: if you stopped doing things, how long would it take for people to forget about you? And he scared me when he answered almost immediately, "Six months". But Novak's advice to Tim was the opposite: "Take as long as you want if you're talented. You'll get their attention again if you have reason to." BOOM! - SAYING NO This came up as a theme in many of Tim's podcasts (including one with me about my book, "The Power of No"). When you are young and getting started, say "Yes" to anything. Tim was talking to super-investor Chris Sacca who said, "I'd even show up at meetings where I wasn't invited." But ultimately, so many "inbound" requests come in for your time you have to say "no" to almost all of it. Tim says: "3 to 4 mornings per week I am in "maker" mode until at least 1pm" - creativity without allowing for ANY interruptions. - "WISDOM IS ABOUT FOLLOWING YOUR OWN ADVICE" Sam Harris (a prior guest on my podcast as well) told Tim this. I strongly believe this. For a few years I was writing about my "daily practice" that I had used many times when things were at their worst for me. Then in 2015, two really difficult things happened to me. One financial and one in my relationships. Right away I said to myself, "Ok, let's see if this still works". And every night I would check the boxes: Did I improve 1% today physically,, emotionally, mentally, spiritually. Without this, I think I would have died or spun into massive depression both times. I followed my own advice. If you can't do this, then no advice will work. Advice is autobiography. ---- After the podcast was over, Tim and I spoke for awhile. He gave me advice about my podcast. He gave me advice about my next book. He told me some of the things that didn't make it into the book. Tim strives to increase his creativity. To experiment with new ideas, new formats, new ways to apply his creativity. "Try things as an experiment. Always give yourself an out. Then when something works, double down." I left his place and it was dark. I had spent the past week doing nothing but reading his book and preparing. The last thing Tim suggested, "Think about what advice your future self would give you right now." I thought about it. I went home. Had dinner. Thought more. This is what my 60 year old self should say if he could advise me right now: Care deeply about the work you do today. The future will take care of itself. Oh and, "Don't be late."  
Ep. 185 - Cal Newport: Become So Good You Can't Be Ignored
You’re either horrible or miserable. Woody Allen has this joke in “Annie Hall.” He says, “Life is divided into the horrible and the miserable. That’s the two categories. The horrible are terminal cases. You know? And blind people, crippled… I don’t know how they get through life… It’s amazing to me. And the miserable is everyone else. So you should be thankful that you’re miserable. Because that’s very lucky… to be miserable.” I guess I’m one of the lucky ones. We complain about getting older or not having a passion, etc. “In relatively recent history—we’re talking the 1980s and later—we got convinced into believing we all have a capital P ‘Passion,’” Cal Newport said. Cal’s a tenured professor at Georgetown. And majored in computer science. So did I. Fact: You can’t pre-test a fetus to see what its passion will be. Passion is not in your DNA. I wasn’t born to podcast. Or write. Or be a father. I was just born… And I have eyes. So I see what other people are doing. I have ears. So I hear who’s winning. And then my brain asks, “Why am I here?” “People believe if we look inside ourselves and discover what our passion is, we’ll be happy. I studied this question in the book and that’s not how it happens,” Cal said. “Passion comes later.” First you have to “become so good you can’t be ignored…” 1. Start with an interest Steve Martin reinvented stand-up. He told jokes without punchlines. And let the tension linger. He didn’t start with a passion for comedy. You start with an interest. I never thought, “Interviewing prostitutes at 3 a.m. is my passion.” But I got good at it. I was curious. And I’m still asking questions today. 2. Build career capital Cal did a study. He found a database developer who became too good to be ignored. And used that as leverage. “She got into the computer industry with no background. At every stage, she said, ‘What would be valuable here?’” Now she spends 4-6 months working in her cubicle job. And the other  4-6 months in Thailand. Acquire career capital. And leverage it. This is how you get autonomy in the workplace. “It’s what lets you get a sense of mastery,” Cal said. “It’s what makes you get a sense of impact, and this is where passion actually comes from.” 3. Focus on rare and valuable skills The first food truck was a pretzel stand. It had wheels and food. Now Michelin-star chefs have food trucks and pop-up shops. They didn’t learn how to make pretzels. Or follow the trend. They used rare and valuable skills to innovate the market. I built websites in the ‘90s. That was my first company. But as soon as I heard my eighth-grade sister was learning coding in school, I sold the company. Coding was no longer rare and valuable. And competition was about to explode. Control competition and you’ll control the market. 4. Get to the cutting edge of an industry Mastery leads to passion, not the other way around. You weren’t “born” to invent the next iPhone. Nobody was. Even the people inventing the next iPhone weren’t born to invent the next iPhone. “Innovations don’t come at the very start of your journey.” You have to get to the cutting edge, learn what’s missing, identify room for growth and innovate.   5. Do deep work Deep work is the process of becoming great. “It requires hard, hard focus and pushes your skill to its limit.” It’s what you do to become the best in your field. And discover holes in your organization. Or in the planet. It’s how you create ride-sharing, social networking, Google maps underwater. Cal says how at [16:04]  6. Or don't... I asked Cal, “Do you think most people actually want to be really good at something… Or do most people just want more time off to just do nothing?” I don’t set goals. Or evaluate my growth. If I can support the growth of other people, cheer them on, smile and say, “Congratulations on getting up today,” then the window gets bigger. Maybe success isn’t “being so good you can’t be ignored.” Maybe it’s being so good you can’t ignore others. This is what works for me. This is my deep work.  
[Bonus] - Tim Ferriss: [Part 2] Where Are You Not Replaceable?
I was very late and I was very upset at myself. I had flown three thousand miles. I moved into an Airbnb right next to where Tim was staying. I had written thousands of notes on ripped pieces of paper and stuck them all throughout the book. I had notes written up and around all the margins. I listened to dozens of his podcasts. And I've known him for years. All morning I had jotted down possible questions. And I was late to meet Tim for our podcast. Because the west coast is three hours a way in time travel from the east coast. That's how stupid I am. I rushed over and he was waiting. Tim follows his own advice. He was relaxed. No problems. I apologized, we spoke for awhile, and then started the podcast. Three hours later...not even close to done but we stopped. I want to be a better person in life. I want to be healthier. I want to be more creative. I want to find what is hidden inside of me, dig around, unleash it. I want to find the strength to do that. It's not an easy to thing to do. To scrape the dirt and dust that collects inside of ourselves. To explore. To wander. To create. Tim's book, "Tools of the Titans" is a guidebook for doing the above. And I had a lot of questions. ---- A few months after I started my podcast in 2014, Tim wrote me and said, "Can I call you and ask you some questions about podcasting". I said sure and he called and we talked for quite awhile. He called many podcasters during this period. Then he started his own podcast. He DOMINATED. All of his guests were amazing. He told me he was getting so much great advice from his guests it was overwhelming. The aftermath of a hailstorm where everything is just glowing and even the air you breathe seems cleansed. But that lasts only a short time until the atmosphere is filled with the everyday pollution of life. So he took a month off, re-listened to all his podcasts, and just for his own use he wrote down the advice he was hearing. "But it was too much," he told me. "I kept writing. It was clearly a book." It's not like any other book he's written. He steps out of the way in many cases, and let's these super-achievers do the talking. He curates their thoughts. They had found the hidden gems inside themselves, and long ago brought them up to share with the world to achieve their successes, and now they documented them with Tim. That's why I flew 3000 miles. I wanted the gems. I wanted answers. ---- I've had so many ups and downs I try to quantify what works on the way up. What goes wrong on the way down. I try to quantify: what are the steps for reinvention? I wonder: what makes someone break out of mediocrity? About seven months ago I threw out all of my belongings. I gave away or donated to the library about 3000 books. All of my books now are on my kindle. None of the answers were in my things. But now I have one physical book. Tim's. And I plan to keep it. Here are ten things (among many) I learned from the book and from our podcast: "ALL I HAVE TO DO IS SHOW UP" I'm impressed how Tim did his work before starting a podcast. Starting something new is not about taking risks. Jumping into the unknown, getting out of the comfort zone, doing something scary. It's not about bravery. It's the exact opposite. You can only do so many "new" things in life. So do the work beforehand. He called people up. He learned the craft as much as he could. He talked to people ranging from me to people at Apple. He had initial guests lined up. He had a huge launch. And he told me the other day that he is persistent at getting his guests. One recent guest, he told me, took two years to book. Which was refreshing for me to hear since it often takes me that long or longer to book many guests. Comedian Whitney Cummings told him: "My work is not done on the night of a big standup special. My work was done three months ago. All I have do is show up." Even though I was late for our podcast, I'm glad I showed up. - DOING IS EVERYTHING Derek Sivers told him, "If all we needed was more information, then everyone would be a billionaire with perfect abs." It's the DOING that's difficult. I asked Tim: "there's 700 pages of advice here. How can anyone follow everything? How do you know what will work for you?" Just pick a few things. Pick what resonates with you. Start slowly. It doesn't matter what you do. Just start DO-ing. Dan Ariely once told me something similar. "If you say sorry to someone, even if you don't mean it, even if THEY KNOW you don't mean it, then you still have a better relationship with them a year later compared with people who never say sorry." DOING > THINKING. - BLEED From Morgan Spurlock, the director of "Supersize Me" and many other great documentaries. "Don't be afraid to show your scars". This is not a book about suicide. But Tim shares the time he was considering it. This is not a book about anxiety or depression. But Tim shares his battles with those demons. This book is not just a book of advice, it's a book of Tim's own journey as he tries to make his life better. In the section with Tony Robbins, Tony talks about how he wakes up every morning and writes about what he is anxious about. I find this is very helpful. Instead of complaining to the outside world, you reveal to your inside world what it is you are scared of. When I was talking to Susan David in another podcast, she told me how if you write down your vulnerabilities just ONCE for 20 minutes, then even up to six months later the experimental group showed less signs of stress than the control group. Be vulnerable, write down three anxieties a day. I can't be true to others if I'm not true to myself. - MORNING PAGES Julia Cameron writes about this in the classic book, "The Artists Way". Brian Koppelman, writer of Rounders, Ocean's 13, Billions, etc swears by this technique for increasing his creativity. Many of Tim's guests say the same thing. What are morning pages? Sit down in the morning, write in longhand three pages of garbage without stopping. This uncages the anxious "monkey mind" and puts it on the page. It unleashes any writer's block because you have permission to write total nonsense. It frees the mind for the creativity it needs to do that day. - THE DOUBLE THREAT GUIDE TO BEING SUCCESSFUL When Tim spoke to Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert, Scott told him: "I always advise young people to become good public speakers". Anyone can do that, he says, with practice. "Suddenly you're in charge or maybe you are starting your own company. Capitalism rewards things that are both rare and valuable." If you are good at public speaking and one other skill, you make yourself more rare and valuable. Before Warren Buffett made one dime of money, he took a Dale Carnegie course on public speaking. After that, he made a dime of money. Or two. - DON'T BE AFRAID TO DO SOMETHING YOU'RE NOT QUALIFIED TO DO Dan Carlin, host of the super-podcast "Hardcore History" told Tim this. Dan was not a historian, didn't have a PhD, but was fascinated by history. His mother(!) told him, "why don't you do a podcast about the stories you tell here at the dinner table." He told his mother, but I don't have a doctorate." His mother said, "I didn't realize you had to have a doctorate to tell stories". And now he has the most popular history-based podcast on the planet. Kamal Ravikant, a past and future guest on my own podcast, told Tim, "If I only did things I was qualified for I'd be pushing a broom somewhere." Schools, corporations, government, parents, friends, want to put you in their own boxes. They have a menu for you, with only very limited choices today. But if you don't choose your own themes in life, then someone else will do the choosing for you and the results won't be as good. - THE THOUSAND TRUE FAN THEORY....EXPANDED Kevin Kelly tells tim, "Success need not be complicated. Just start with making 1000 people extremely extremely happy," Three ideas from this: Kevin's idea is that if they are true super fans, you will be able to build a product, charge for it, and they will pay, making you a living. Build a product that makes their lives better. Second idea: Have direct contact with your fans. This gets rid of all the middlemen and turns your relationships into a tribe. Third idea: Not every fan is a super fan. But the super fans will help you communicate with the other people who would be receptive to your message. The key here being: have an important and unique message. One that helps people. One that is a vision that people can believe in. Start small. Focus on the people who really care about what you are doing. As Seth Godin even says, "Find Ten" if you have to. Because if t's a good idea then ten will tell ten who will tell ten. Book recommendation from this chapter: "Small Giants" by Bo Burlingham, about companies that choose to be the best rather than the biggest. - ASK DUMB QUESTIONS This is a common theme throughout the book. Tony Robbins tells Tim, "We are the quality of the questions we ask." And both Alex Blumberg (super podcaster) and Malcolm Gladwell talk about the importance of asking dumb questions. People sometimes criticize me for interrupting guests on my podcasts. I get it. But the reality is: if I don't understand something during the podcast, then when else will I get the chance to understand. Alex Blumberg gives some good ways to start dumb questions: "Tell me about a time when..." "Tell me about the day when..." "What were the exact steps that got you to...." "Describe the conversation when..." And then with a follow up to any answer like, "How did that make you feel?" -- NO COMPLAINING Tracey DiNunzio told Tim a great line which I underlined twice in the book: "When you complain, NOBODY wants to help you": If you only focus what is wrong, then you will bring the people around you down. Be a source of growth for the people around you, so that they can become a source of growth for you. It's the "Honda" theory. If you just bought a Honda, you will suddenly see Hondas all over the road. If all you do is complain, you will only see the scarcity everywhere. And the abundance will leave you in the dust. - DON'T BELIEVE IN ALL THE SELF-HELP BOOKS This is not quite what was said, but this is my personal takeaway. BJ Novak, a writer from "The Office" for it's entire run and a successful comedian told Tim, "I read the book Daily Rituals and I am demoralized by how many great people start their day early." Instead, BJ spends several hours getting in a good mood. Walking, playing, fooling around, reading newspapers, etc. Getting in a good mood was the surest way to get creative ideas. He takes his own path. BJ's podcast recommendation: "Intelligence Squared". Oh! VERY important lesson from Novak. I'm always stressed that I need to publish every day. I even asked Ice T once: if you stopped doing things, how long would it take for people to forget about you? And he scared me when he answered almost immediately, "Six months". But Novak's advice to Tim was the opposite: "Take as long as you want if you're talented. You'll get their attention again if you have reason to." BOOM! - SAYING NO This came up as a theme in many of Tim's podcasts (including one with me about my book, "The Power of No"). When you are young and getting started, say "Yes" to anything. Tim was talking to super-investor Chris Sacca who said, "I'd even show up at meetings where I wasn't invited." But ultimately, so many "inbound" requests come in for your time you have to say "no" to almost all of it. Tim says: "3 to 4 mornings per week I am in "maker" mode until at least 1pm" - creativity without allowing for ANY interruptions. - "WISDOM IS ABOUT FOLLOWING YOUR OWN ADVICE" Sam Harris (a prior guest on my podcast as well) told Tim this. I strongly believe this. For a few years I was writing about my "daily practice" that I had used many times when things were at their worst for me. Then in 2015, two really difficult things happened to me. One financial and one in my relationships. Right away I said to myself, "Ok, let's see if this still works". And every night I would check the boxes: Did I improve 1% today physically,, emotionally, mentally, spiritually. Without this, I think I would have died or spun into massive depression both times. I followed my own advice. If you can't do this, then no advice will work. Advice is autobiography. ---- After the podcast was over, Tim and I spoke for awhile. He gave me advice about my podcast. He gave me advice about my next book. He told me some of the things that didn't make it into the book. Tim strives to increase his creativity. To experiment with new ideas, new formats, new ways to apply his creativity. "Try things as an experiment. Always give yourself an out. Then when something works, double down." I left his place and it was dark. I had spent the past week doing nothing but reading his book and preparing. The last thing Tim suggested, "Think about what advice your future self would give you right now." I thought about it. I went home. Had dinner. Thought more. This is what my 60 year old self should say if he could advise me right now: Care deeply about the work you do today. The future will take care of itself. Oh and, "Don't be late."  
Yesterday's "10 Ideas" List (Proof that BAD Ideas Lead to The Good Ideas)
I get this question a lot: “Did you start coming up with ideas because you were already successful?” I'll tell you WHY they ask this. Because people think "I need to pay my bills and THEN I'll change my life." That's backwards. I was dead broke and dead lonely when I started writing 10 ideas a day. It changed my life. Even the bad ones. So I still do it. Every single day. In this episode, I sit with Steve Cohen and go over yesterday's idea list ("10 Reality TV Show Ideas"). You'll see why ideas are infinite. And how bad ideas lead to the best ideas.  I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.    Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram
455 - Bishop T.D. Jakes: How to Turn Unexpected Pain into Power
Bishop T.D Jakes has served millions of people all over the world. He listens to their stories. And has learned this: "Pain always leaves a gift behind." And he wants to teach you how to find that gift. "Sometimes things happen to us that we did not choose," he said. This episode and T.D.'s new book, "Crushing" will help you deal with that truth.  I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.    Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram
Ep. 245 - Mark Manson: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F---
Mark Manson is a writer, blogger and author of the "New York Times" bestseller, "The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F-ck". Visit his blog, markmanson.net, to read some of his best articles on self improvement, dating and relationships, culture and life choices.   2 mins - I tell Mark why I didn't initially want him in the show... and why I changed my mind 4 mins - Mark and I first met at a friend’s poker game. then I ran into him a few weeks later. But I didn't remember meeting. “Hi I'm James,” I said. Then I remembered. And I realized he was the guy from the poker game… the guy who's name I kept trying to figure out all night. “I just thought you were a chill guy,” Mark said. We laughed. That's how I'd like to start all new moments in life. With a laugh. 8 min - Mark says where he got the inspiration to write his bestselling book, "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck" 10 min - We talk about what “giving a fuck” actually means. And how to decide what's worthwhile. “I joke around with a lot of people,” Mark said. “I say I wanted to write a book about values...but I knew if I wrote a book about values no one would read it. So I put the F word everywhere. Because essentially what giving a fuck is is you are deciding what you care about. You are deciding what you value in your life.” 12 min - So then I ask Mark how you get started? 14 min - We talk about people pleasing. And self absorption. “It’s very common in the self help world to say, ‘Be true to yourself and follow your feelings.’ That’s nice and everything, but if I went out to 6th Avenue and started peeing on the corner just because I feel like it…” I interrupted. “Is that your true passion? Peeing in 6th Ave. That’s your truth?” “Yes this is my truth at the moment…” Then he got serious. “We live in a society. We’re inner-dependent on each other in many ways. So there’s tension between what you yourself want and what’s also good for the community around you. And that’s hard. I think a lot of people suffer because that balance has gotten out of whack too far one way or the other. Either their constantly people-pleasing or they’re constantly selfish and self-absorbed.” 15 min - I feel everyone starts out people pleasing. And adulthood is when you cross into being more independent. Not necessary self absorbed, but the part of your brain that works to increase your livelihood and sense of survival kicks in. And the struggle is to let go of the “people pleasing” aspect. The part of you that needs approval. I still struggle with this. “Choosing yourself” is choosing to give yourself the stamp of approval. I try this everyday. 17 min - Mark sold drugs when he was 13. Someone told the principal and he got kicked out of school. Six months later his parents got a divorce. 22  min - So I asked, “What do you think your parents could have or should have done differently in this situation?” 28 min - There's a trick to having a good relationship, he told me… it's sort of an equation. Or a scale. 31 min - He fell into a “bottomless pit” of approval. He chased every woman on campus. And learned the rules of attraction. He told me about the really sleazy pick up lines he'd use. “Does that stuff work?”I asked. “It attracts  really insecure women,” he said. And that led to his dating theory: you end up attracting what you put out. 33 min - He took what he learned about dating to build a coaching business. 35 min - We talk about Tucker Max’s books and how they’re often taken the wrong way. 41 min - Mark started traveling and living off his online business. He got serious about his writing. 43 min - Mark explains the attachment theory 45 min - He read “The Four Hour Workweek,” by Tim Ferriss. And based his nomadic life around it.  But traveling forced Mark into avoiding intimacy. He kept leaving friends behind. And later learned what he really wanted... 47 min - I asked Mark, “When did you start giving a fuck?” 48 min - He told me how he got back to his roots to see what made him happiest 50 min - Mark explains how new and exciting experiences start to fade as you get older... 53 min - And he told me why putting down roots and building a community was his newly discovered biggest value. 55 min - Then I wanted to learn the art of. It giving a fuck. There are a lot of subtleties. So I asked, “What steps do I need to take today to stop insecurities and not care as much?” 58 min - People always ask me how to find customers or readers or a marker. The first rule is this: if you make something that’s valuable, people will show up. 1 hour 2 minutes - We talk about constantly finding different metrics to measure your success by. 1 hour 3 minutes - We talk about a chapter in Chuck Klosterman’s book, But What If We're Wrong?: Thinking About the Present As If It Were the Past, on what survives and how it correlates with a chapter in Mark’s book.   1 hour 6 minutes - What is the subtle art, how do you do it? 1 hour 9 minutes - There are a few fundamental principles to stop giving time and energy into things that really don't matter to you. We break them down. 1 hour 12 minutes - Mark talks about starting to write his next book about relationships and how he’s already been comparing it to his first book… that's the death to all creativity. You need a free, unstressed mind to be creative everyday. Comparison is creativity’s heart attack. 1 hour 15 minutes - Every time you switch tribes, you switch the metrics of comparison. Pay attention to your tribes values. And disown any that don't matter to your heart. 1 hour 18 minutes - Your brain is always going to find a problem or a comparison, the trick it to figure out the game and trust it a little less.
AA Ep. 336 - Dominating a Room with Your Body Cues
What if someone told you that your behavior was controlled by a powerful, invisible force? Nick Morgan, the author of Power Cues, joins James today to tell the fantastic story of how, after a serious concussion that left him in a coma for about 10 days, Nick lost the ability to read other people he knew. He could no longer read their body language. He couldn't read the cues. After a couple of months of agony, something switched back on. That experience awakened in Nick a lifelong interest in body language, gesture, and voice, and a drive to understand how people really communicate with each other. Listen here today as Nick relays some amazing stories about how you can take control of your communication. Regards, David Newman   P.S. For a very limited time, I want to send you a brand-new, hardback copy of my new book for FREE! All I ask is that you cover the shipping costs (just $5).
Ep. 115 - Rick Ross: How to Manage Your Employees When They're All Carrying Guns
"I'm the kind of person who is embarrassed to lie," says "Freeway" Rick Ross. Not the words you would expect to come from a convicted felon. Rick built an empire, a drug empire that is, the notorious Los Angeles crack-cocaine empire. But the man who built this empire is not an evil man as you might suspect. He is charitable, a teacher, and an ideal leader. "I always knew I was going to jail," he tells me. So why did I interview him? First off, his story is the kind that creates curiosity. It is so foreign to me – a good, Jewish boy. It's thrilling. Second, our stories have a common theme: How do you pick yourself up when you're at rock bottom? His rock bottom was finding out he was sentenced to life in prison. How do you stay motivated after discovering your entire future will be in a cage? How do you not run away? Can you "choose yourself" here? Yes. Before bottom, Rick was illiterate. He picked himself up by improving every day. He read 300 books, the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, and more all before he was granted bail. He was given a sentence, but he changed his destiny. You can, too. Rick also has expert advice on how to resolve conflicts. In his business, he had power and guns but chose peace over force time and time again. His story is a good example of how to build loyalty. You can use his experience to create loyal teams and partnerships in your life and work, too. The moral of the story here is not how you find success. It's what you do with it that matters. During his rise to the top, Rick gave back to his community. He gives back today by advocating literacy and speaking in schools. After listening, you could write a "10 ideas" list on how you can give back to your community today. If nothing else, I hope this interview inspires you to improve your destiny and others. In This Episode, You Will Learn: •How to resolve conflicts •How to build loyal relationships •Examples of strong work ethic •Why literacy is important •How to gain clientele and use word-of-mouth marketing •Plus much more... Links and Resources Mentioned in the Show: •Read "Freeway" Rick Ross' inspiring book, Freeway Rick Ross: The Untold Autobiography. •Follow "Freeway" Rick Ross on Twitter. •Check out Jayson Gaignard's conference, MastermindTalks, which is where I interviewed Rick Ross. •My article, "What I learned about leadership when I interviewed the biggest drug dealer in history."   Thanks so much for listening!
Ep. 71 - Sam Harris: Is Sam Harris the Smartest Person Alive?
Sam Harris, a brilliant and often controversial author and lecturer, joins James today to talk about science, religion, spirituality, and Ben Affleck.   Ted.com has said of him...   "Questions of good and evil, right and wrong are commonly thought unanswerable by science. But Sam Harris argues that science can — and should — be an authority on moral issues, shaping human values and setting out what constitutes a good life."   Sam is willing to take on the topics that most run from. Today he and James dive into all of them.   What is consciousness? How does something as simple as a thought take over you?   You have an angry thought and suddenly you're angry. How can a happy thought make you happy?   Is this controllable and should you want to control your thoughts?   Sam says yes...   The energy of anger can be very useful. There are times when you want to convey anger. Detaching yourself from passion can become a huge liability and often unhealthy.     This is an amazing interview. Open your mind and allow some of Sam's ideas to force you to think deeply.
Ep. 63 - Tucker Max: Tucker's Surprise Announcement!
Tucker Max, New York Times best selling author of I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell promised James that he would talk about his private life publicly first on The James Altucher Show.   And he sure doesn’t disappoint.   You’ll have to tune in to find out what he reveals here first…
Ep. 56 - Shane Snow: Hacks To Fast Track Your Business
  Most people will tell you there are no shortcuts when it comes to achieving success as an entrepreneur.   Shane Snow, author of the book Smartcuts: How Hackers, Innovators, and Icons Accelerate Success, will tell you differently. Shane set out to study entrepreneurs that successfully fast tracked their businesses.   He interviewed many successful people and found nine patterns that can be learned by anyone to help accelerate their businesses or personal careers.   Shane believes "paying dues" is an archaic practice. Shane and James break down case studies for listeners that show how quickly companies can grow by hacking the system.   Shane defines what an entrepreneurial success and failure look like. You'll learn the characteristics winning entrepreneurs have.   As usual, James brings his own unique insights to this interview.     You don't want to miss what they have to say.
Ep. 100 - T. Harv Eker: Secrets of the Millionaire's Mind
We all have what Eker calls your "money blueprint." You've been taught to think the thoughts you think. If you were taught bad habits, then you may be programmed to continue to follow with bad habits throughout your life. And when you realize this, you can make a profound change in your life. From a very early age, Eker wanted nothing more than to become a millionaire. He tried so many different businesses to try to get there. Every one of them failed. What he eventually realized was that he had to focus on what he loved. He borrowed $2,000 on his credit card and started one of the first retail fitness stores. His vision wasn't one store; it was a chain of stores. "Create a model, systemize it, and then duplicate it." He finally found success and sold this business to a much larger company. But as fate often has it, the skill set that he had to grow the business was not the same skill set he needed to manage his millions. He realized he still needed to grow. There was something missing. So the research began and it all begins with awareness. Listen today to a great story of someone who realized that he had to "reprogram" his mind and how you can do the same. Plus, Eker is giving away his Life makeover system for free to James' listeners. Go to www.Registerlms.com. P.S. Hi, James here... My new book is finally out! It's taken me a year to put together all the skills I think are needed to create abundance in this new economy. I hope you write me with feedback and questions. I have more books coming. Here's what the initial reviews on this book have said: "James Altucher did it again. I just finished and have to say it was a great read. Great insight into the future of wealth." "I couldn't wait for this book to come out. It was well worth the wait! Very short and jam-packed with good ideas and advice for the budding entrepreneur. A must read!" "This is the road map out. Very specific ideas to get you unstuck and to thrive in the 21st century. If you follow the ideas in this book your will receive 1000% or more in return on your investment." I'm really grateful for the response I've received so quickly. I feel we are quickly building a strong community of people who are deciding to "choose themselves."   If you want to get it exclusively in hardcover, plus several other special reports and a subscription to my brand-new newsletter, which is essentially like the equivalent of two additional chapters every month, claim your copy here
Ep. 95- Kevin Kelly: A Thousand True Fans
Kevin Kelly is Senior Maverick at Wired magazine. He co-founded Wired in 1993, and served as its executive editor from its inception until 1999. He is also editor and publisher of the Cool Tools website, which gets half a million unique visitors per month. From 1984-1990, Kelly was publisher and editor of the Whole Earth Review, a journal of unorthodox technical news. He co-founded the ongoing Hackers' Conference, and was involved with the launch of the WELL, a pioneering online service started in 1985. He authored the best-selling New Rules for the New Economy and the classic book on decentralized emergent systems, Out of Control. Kevin dropped out of college to pursue his real interests, and they are varied. James and Kevin talk about Kevin's idea that "if you have 1000 True Fans then you have a business." This is a wide-ranging conversation about the past, the present, and the future. Kevin's extremely bullish on the future of artificial intelligence, yet he says there is no extinct technology... none. And they talk about a few of his books, Cool Tools and The Silver Cord.   Listen here if you want to see into the future.
Ep. 94 -  A. J. Jacobs: A. J. Returns with a Family Reunion Update
A.J. Jacobs is creating the world's largest family reunion. You may remember A.J. from his first interview on The James Altucher Show a year ago. If you know A.J., you'll know why this is the one event you don't want to miss. He's a master at creating a huge media splash. The Global Family Reunion is set for June 6, 2015 at The New York Hall of Science, on the grounds of the World's Fair. James is a featured speaker along with George H.W. Bush, Dr. Oz, and too many others to list here... plus Morgan Spurlock ("Supersize Me") will be creating a featured documentary of the entire event. James and A.J. talk today about world peace and why when someone is part of your family, you tend to be much more tolerant of them. "Delusional opportunism is a wonderful thing and sometimes it pays off." A.J. is a master at marketing and he tells James some of the hacks he's using to get the word out. This entire experiment will eventually become a book. They talk about their personal writing styles and techniques. AJ says that even if he's stuck, he'll just start typing. It's important to get the movement of your fingers over the keyboard. You can throw out those first 20 minutes, but it's key to get going.   They talk about the origin of the human race and how closely we are related to Neanderthals.
Ep. 82 - Amanda "F'ing" Palmer: Lead With The Truth
Talk about choosing yourself, Amanda Palmer has always blazed a path that pushes the boundaries of what most of us would be comfortable with. Her latest project is a book called The Art of Asking, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help that explores the fear most of us experience. Why is it so hard to ask for something from those who are closest to you? Amanda tells James that it's those who are so close to us that are the ones who can hurt us where it really counts, down deep. Yet, you have to accept the fear and lead with the truth. Amanda and James also dig deep into the problem many of us have, how do you charge for your art, and how much is it really worth? People value things they purchase.   If you believe in your art, then don't be afraid to ask.
378 - James Altucher: Cal Fussman Asks Me About Experimenting with Minimalism & Lifestyle
Cal Fussman was the Editor at Large at Esquire for years where he got to interview Muhammad Ali, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson, Robert DeNiro and hundreds more. So he’s really known as an all star interviewer. He asks big questions. And now he’s interviewing me, which is also live on his podcast “Big Questions.” He named the episode “James Altucher on Reaching For Your Future and Letting Go of Your Past.” So, I guess that’s what this episode is about. He said, “I’d like to go to the start and see the arch of your life.” And I hope you let this episode be an invitation for you to explore your own story arch, too. Links and Resources Why Self-Help Guru James Altucher Only Owns 15 Things by Alex Williams The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo Esquire Amblin Partners - Steven Spielberg's Production Company  Seamless Melanie Whelan - CEO of SoulCycle Guiness Book of World Records My interview with Wolfgang Puck      I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.   Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram
381 - The Power of the Ask
Steve Cohen, my producer, emailed Taylor Swift’s publicist asking if she’d come on the podcast. He knew she was going to say “no.” But he still did it. Steve sends out 200 emails a day, knowing 100% will come back as a “no.” I’m fascinated by this. What’s the point? Where’s the line between annoyance and persistence? I brought Steve on to go over this. I wanted to know the nuances and the subtleties. Because this skill is good for anyone to study. Businesspeople, salespeople, building relationships, finding your mentor, and so on. This is the art of the ask.   Links and Resources Taylor Swift Reverend Jesse Jackson Derek Jeter James Comey My Interview with Seth Godin  My Interview with T.D. Jakes  Omnicom Group Brian Grazer Conan O’Brien Marian Rivera Tyra Banks Bernie Madoff Choose Yourself by Me The Tim Ferriss Show The Moment with Brian Koppelman  Richard Branson Marc Maron Barack Obama The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom by Don Miguel Ruiz Getting There: A Book of Mentors by Gillian Zoe Segal  Spike Lee Jerry Seinfeld    I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.   Also, sign up for a chance to win one of 100 signed copies of my bestselling book "Choose Yourself" at jamesaltucher.com/ChooseYourself     Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram
406 - Howard Marks: Billionaire Investor on Market Cycles (How to Survive the Bad Days & Win the Good Days)
Howard Marks is #374 on the Forbes richest list. He co-founded Oaktree Capital Management and is worth $1.9 billion. I asked, “Do you hate being introduced as a billionaire?” He said, “I do. I don’t think that how much money I have sums me up and I don’t think it’s the greatest thing about me.” And he’s right. He can’t teach you how to be a billionaire. He can only teach you what he knows: investing strategies, market cycles, philosophy, psychology, and how he used all of this to create freedom and wellbeing in life. He writes about this in his new book, “Mastering the Market Cycle: Getting the Odds on Your Side.” The book is as much about finance and market cycles as it is about personal cycles.   I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.   Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram
487 - In Honor & Memory... We Hear An Air Traffic Controller’s 9/11 Story: How Chris Tucker Saved Lives
Chris Tucker is a former air traffic controller. He was working in New York City on 9/11. And spent the whole day trying to keep the passengers of two hijacked planes safe. This episode is his story. It's heroic. And it saved lives. But Chris says, "I was just doing my job." I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast. Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram
505 - Find Your Point of View & Make Money Creating: Nas Daily on The Power of Consistency & Transparency
Nas had a great life. And a great job. He was making a ton of money as a software developer for Venmo. But he was too comfortable. So he started a creative challenge where he traveled around the world. And made a one-minute video every day for 1,000 days. He didn’t skip a single day. Which is not easy. So I wanted to have Nas on the podcast to learn how he got the courage to quit his job, travel the world and become a professional creator.    I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast. Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram   Check Out The Altucher Book Club Series: Apple Podcasts YouTube Instagram
507 - Back from the Dead: Kamal Ravikant Shares How His Near-Death Experience Led to Inner Peace
Kamal Ravikant went to the hospital for a scheduled elective surgery. Everything went great. Until the stitches inside his body ripped. And he felt pain in his stomach. He asked the nurse for medicine. Soon his was spurting blood everywhere. One of the residents held him down to try to stop the bleeding. Kamal sat there in fear as he watched the inside of his liquids get all over this man. They had to get him back into surgery. But this time they didn't know if he'd make it out loud. Right before they put the oxygen mask on, Kamal told the doctor, "I'm scared." She held his hand. And he disappeared out of consciousness. Now he's back. He's alive. And he came on the podcast to share what it feels like to start dying. And how living... surviving brought him a new sense of knowing what matters. And what doesn't.   I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast. Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram   Check Out The Altucher Book Club Series: Apple Podcasts YouTube Instagram
Don’t Follow Your Dreams. Age With Your Interests!
Sometimes our dreams hold us back from thinking about new possibilities. This is a 10-15 minute episode about why I don't believe in following your dreams. And why it's better to age with your interests. (Examples included!) I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.    Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram
What's Your "Natural Personality?"
When Bert Kreischer was little, he did some cute little kid thing on the baseball field. But his dad didn't think it was cute. Or appropriate. And Bert says that "who that kid was" is the core of his "natural personality." Which mirrors the fact that we all grow up somehow. And we all stay the same, too.    This is just one of many moments from my interview with Bert Kreischer. If you like this, then please subscribe and check out the full interview.    Thanks,   James   I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast. Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram
382 - Joe Moglia: Double Reinvention: From Football Coach to CEO of TD Ameritrade & Back to Football
Joe Moglia completely reinvented himself. Twice…   He went from college football coach to CEO of Ameritrade and then BACK to football (his first love). He was at the top of the corporate ladder. And decided to climb down for a coaching internship at the University of Nebraska. I wanted to know why he wasn’t afraid to change careers so drastically. And how he transferred the skills he learned from one industry to a completely different industry… creating a double reinvention.   I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.   Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: Twitter Facebook Linkedin Instagram
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Podcast Details
Started
Jan 1st, 1980
Latest Episode
Jan 17th, 2020
Release Period
Daily
No. of Episodes
593
Avg. Episode Length
About 1 hour
Explicit
No

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