Voices in Japan

A Society, Culture and Travel podcast
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In September 2018, Hokkaido was hit by the biggest earthquake ever recorded on the Northern Japanese island. 5 months later, another earthquake hits the same area. Burke and Ben share their experiences during those worrying times. Get in touch: https://twitter.com/voicesinjapan https://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/ https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/ email: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
We conclude our conversation with Jamie Coventry about all things rugby in Japan. Among other things, we talk about the quality of Japanese rugby and how it has improved significantly over the years. We also get into an interesting chat about head trauma in rugby and other sports such as American football and MMA. Jamie tells us about tackling rules and techniques. He also gives us an insight into his main job as an agent for rugby players and coaches, and his day to day tasks involved in that position. Enjoy!Support the podcast by making a donation.Website:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Over the years, there have been many TV dramas and movies about Yakuza (organized crime syndicates originating in Japan) that often times romanticize membership in the organizations.  While Yakuza have a negative reputation in general, it is not uncommon to come to know a current or former member of one of the clans if you live in Japan, simply because Yakuza are involved in many businesses or other parts of everyday society, and for the most part, they tend to come across as good people.  A close friend of the podcasters and fellow martial artist, Damien, joins this episode to share some of the experiences he has had with Yakuza through jobs that he had during his early years in Japan, and it’s interesting to hear his take on the unique place the Yakuza hold in society.  Please check out Damien’s website that is scheduled to start reselling Japanese sweets and other merchandise from August 2019 (domodomocandy.com), and as always, thank you so much for listening to and supporting the podcast!Support the podcast by making a donation.Conversation highlights:Damien’s motivation to come to Japan to study judo and chiropractic treatment after practicing judo in his native country of FranceThe history of the Yakuza going back to the feudal 1600s in Japan when Burakumin (an outcast group at the bottom of the social order) came together to form organized gangsThe difficulties that Damien faced with finding work when he first came to Sapporo, and how that eventually led to an introduction and job interview with a former Yakuza lieutenant, Mr. “S.”The background of Mr. S, his position with the Inagawa-kai (one of the largest Yakuza groups in Japan based in the Kanto region), and the reason he could speak FrenchThe way that Mr. S came to acquire a moving company where Damien became employed during his early 20s in SapporoThe reason why some Yakuza choose not to get irezumi (traditional Japanese tattoos done by hand, using wooden handles and metal needles, and special “nara” ink), and the difference between irezumi and normal tattoosYakuza removing a piece of their finger for dishonoring the group, failing at group objectives, or money-related issuesDamien tells a story of a “job” he was asked to participate in, where nothing too serious occurred, but it led him to start questioning his involvement with the group of Mr. SThe first signs that Damien started to notice that hinted at Mr. S being YakuzaA comparison of Yakuza with gangs in other countries, and the businesses in which they are involved, in general and in Sapporo specificallyThe ways that Yakuza have contributed to society, such as protection against petty crime and sending volunteers to areas affected by natural disasters, and the questions of their true motivation in doing such actsThe guys talk about their regular interaction with current or former Yakuza in their everyday lives Website:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Japan imports a variety of essentials for modern living, including native English speakers to teach them the language. Some actually arrive into Narita or Haneda Airport with the proper credentials for the job, while others may only be searching for a unique adventure in a foreign land for one or two years.  What are the realities that they all end up facing on the job, and what drew Jon and our podcast hosts into staying in Japan, specifically Sapporo, for much longer than they originally intended? Listen now for a very entertaining take on the notorious career of English teaching in Japan!Support the podcast by making a donation.Conversation highlights:Ben encounters a guy bedazzled by how long some people stay in JapanThe Yosakoi Soran Festival that takes place in June in SapporoThe addiction to the Hokkaido lifestyleLiving overseas in a country like Japan is a great resume boosterWhat was Jon’s original intention for coming to Japan?Why is there a stigma attached to teaching English?What are the basic requirements for teaching English in Japan?Ben and Jon disagree on whether the majority of English teachers enjoy their jobThe very gratifying lifestyle that teaching English allowsThe frustrations that experienced teachers may face when teaching English in JapanWhich job feels more meaningful: teaching in conversation schools or public schools?Burke compares his experience on the JET (Japan Exchange and Teaching) Program to that of teaching in a large conversation schoolWhy do schools in Japan prefer to hire teachers with little experience?Comparing the large conversation schools during the English boom to todayThe negative effect of teachers with little commitment to the JobA famous comic strip in Japan, Charisma Man, which humorously captures the celebrity status that foreign men often enjoy in JapanHow did Jon become an English teacher in the US?How did Jon find teaching in the very same high school he attended as a teenager?How do the attitudes of students in the US compare with their Japanese counterparts?Ben explains why he enjoys being a teacher, and also the best level of students to teachA video filmed by students in Japan that illustrates very well the level of respect that teachers in Japan command in their schoolsJon tells his own story of having to discipline a model student to ensure other students understood what type of behavior is acceptableThe best way to avoid the risk of losing work as a university teacherBen explains his professional background, which is completely unrelated to education The best large conversation school to work for, and some of the bizarre training programs at other conversations schoolsEven though Japanese teachers definitely have struggles at work, they seem to have a much better situation than teachers overseas - more respect, better pay, and tame students.  However, if you are looking for the best avenue to enjoy a cruisy lifestyle, few careers can beat teaching English in Japan as a foreigner.  To learn about our podcasters’ and Jon’s experience, the good and the bad, and also some advice they have for people considering a career as an English teacher in Japan, listen now!Website:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get
Japanese students are mega busy. Many of them go to school 6 days a week! They join school clubs, go to cram school, AND they have homework. It’s not cruisy like their western counterparts.Get in Touch:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/email: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Burke and Ben talk about the new Japanese Emperor, Naruhito, and some of the controversies surrounding him and his family. We discuss The Emperor's enthronement, which was on October 22, 2019, and some issues that the royal family have encountered, such as the next heir to the throne, the debate about having a female Empress, princess Masako’s previous health problems, Princess Mako's wedding postponement, the Emperor’s “feud” with his brother, and much much more!Support the showWebsite:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Have you lived in Japan for a long time and still find it difficult to get used to some mannerisms or characteristics that are part of the culture?  Our podcasters, Ben and Burke, discuss some of those that they may never become comfortable with no matter how long they live here, including behavior around the office and schools, the senpai/kouhai (senior/junior) relationship, and much much more!Support the showWebsite:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Yuki joins us on the podcast again to share her insights about the Japanese diet. We compare Japanese and Western diets, talk about home cooking, and how the Japanese diet is becoming less healthy.We also discuss the five biggest differences between Japanese and Western diets. Enjoy the show!Support the podcast by making a donation.Website:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Do you know your blood type? Well, if you are visiting or living in Japan, you should. Knowing one’s blood type is common in Japan and the Japanese are very curious to know yours. There are four main types that most people fall into. The most common blood type in Japan is type A and is the most desired type to be. Why is that? Similar to star signs from the Chinese Zodiac, the different blood types represent particular character and personality traits. There are also, supposedly, certain blood types that go well together, and others that are a complete disaster. Would you decide your partner based on their blood type?Conversation highlights:What are the main blood types and what character traits do they represent?Percentage distribution of blood types in Japan, US and the UK.Why most Japanese aspire to be blood type A.What are Ben and Burke’s blood types?Burke shares the story of finding out his blood type in Japan.Blood type used for compatibility.Why is blood type important to Japanese people?Japanese words of the day.Listener question: Why did Ben and Burke come to Japan?What the hosts think of the TV show “You wa nani shi ni nippon eh?” (Why did you come to Japan).In the past blood type has been used to judge people in Japan, in particular there were instances when Japanese companies would reject potential employees if their blood type was undesirable. This led to people lying about their blood types on their applications. Fortunately, now, blood type is not a requirement when job hunting. I wonder if there was ever an issue with star signs in western countries? Although Japanese people are interested in knowing about blood types, many foreigners still don’t know theirs, and don’t really think it is important. It is necessary to know one’s blood type for medical operations, but when that happens the hospital can find out as and when without needing the patient to know. They should find out for themselves because the patient might even lie about their blood type to be more desirable!If you enjoyed the episode please leave us a review on iTunes. It only takes a minute! It would really help us get out there and we would really appreciate it. Website:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
On this episode of Voices in Japan, Ben and Burke discuss Carlos Ghosn's escape from what he has referred to as Japan's "hostage justice system."  In what can only be described as a spectacular fall from the highest level of business fame in Japan over two decades, Mr. Ghosn was out on bail, living in Tokyo, and awaiting trial for allegations of financial misconduct before fleeing the country to Lebanon in a dramatic escape last December by sneaking out of the country inside of a large box for musical equipment on board a private plane.  This episode covers the claims of an inside plot between Nissan and the Japan government to oust Mr. Ghosn from power, the ridiculous circumstances that allowed him to escape, and the scrutiny that Japan's legal system has been under for its treatment of suspects.Please check out the video of the recording of this episode that will be uploaded soon to our YouTube channel and also our new website!Support the showWebsite:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_j5MDnT7As60a2Br7YfHSwFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
On this episode, Ben and Burke attempt to tackle the issues related to gender inequality in Japan by learning more about how women are discriminated against in the workforce and the unfair expectations that society can have towards women.  But are all Japanese women actually unhappy in a society that ranked 121st out of 153 countries in the 2019 Global Gender Gap Report?  And did our podcasters do a good job of maturing a bit by reviewing the issues?  Listen to the episode to find out now!Support the showWebsite:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/YouTubehttps://youtu.be/G78DxDtFl-wFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Wasei-eigo are English words (but not really), and could also be referred to as Japlish.  They are words created in Japan, and are therefore only really understood by Japanese people (unless you learn them!). However, Japanese people think they are authentic English words, even the ones that are borrowed from other languages. So be careful. Japanese people may use them with you!There are many of these wasei eigo and new ones are popping up every year, but on todays episode, Burke and Ben discuss the ones they find the most interesting. Enjoy the show!You can also watch this episode, a couple of days after the audio release, on the Voices in Japan Podcast Youtube channel.Support the showWebsite:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/Follow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
The Japanese mystique - what makes foreigners stay? There are myriad reasons, ranging from broad to highly specific. For Burke and Ben hot water surging from the earth, beautiful women, and universal access to clean toilets were three primary features to Japan’s allure. Support the showWebsite:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/YouTubehttps://youtu.be/G78DxDtFl-wFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
On this episode of the podcast, Ben and Burke take a look at some common myths about Japan.  Is it easy for overseas visitors to travel around the country? Is the world-famous Kobe beef the best and most delicious beef in the country? Is the very popular cherry blossom season the ideal time to visit Japan?  Find out the answers to these questions and others by listening to the episode now!Support the showWebsite:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/Follow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Ben and Burke discuss the rules for a first date based on articles written by Japanese people, a survey of Japanese women, and their own personal experiences with dating in Japan.  Topics covered include best locations for a first date, can you expect a kiss, when do things become official, and when do people normally move on to the next level of intimacy!  Enjoy!You can also watch this episode, a couple of days after the audio release, on the Voices in Japan Podcast Youtube channel.Support the showWebsite:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/Follow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
On this episode, our podcasters discuss funerals in Japan, including the expenses incurred, influence of Buddhism, the common custom of cremations at Japanese funerals, and much much more.  Enjoy the show!Support the showWebsite:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Looking for a career in Japan?  Get ready for the crazy welcome parties, off the cuff greetings and farewell speeches, morning stretches, meetings on top of meetings, and the possibility of literally working to death, aka karoshi! Can the government policies being introduced actually reform the challenges affecting Japan's labor force? Find out how our podcasters have been navigating their way over the years and surviving the notorious Japanese working culture!
Special guest Yumi joins the podcast to give the guys a new perspective on life in Japan.  In this episode full of laughs, our podcasters learn about the growing exercise trends taking over the land of the rising sun, and also discover the great lengths to which Japanese women will go to avoid the wrath of their mothers-in-law, and even other women, as they struggle to maintain the image of being the perfect mother and wife. Also, why do Japanese girls and women find it easier to express their true feelings with foreign guys? Listen to the episode to find out now!Conversation highlights:•  Is exercising at a sports gym popular in Japan like it is in western countries?•  What are the benefits of yoga versus the benefits of CrossFit?•  Why did Yumi decide that she wanted to join CrossFit?•  How are the bodies and mindset of the people in the gym different in Japan?•  Why are many Japanese guys intimidated by girls with athletic bodies?•  Why are the podcasters infatuated with the Japanese female body?•  Why do Japanese women feel so much pressure to be a perfect mother and perfect wife•  Why do wives in Japan feel like they need to ask for permission from their husbands just to go out with their girlfriends, or even hang out at a friend's house!?•  Why don't Japanese married couples share the responsibilities around the house?•  Why can Japanese women express themselves better with foreign guys?•  What is the best way to flirt with a Japanese girl at the bar? Is there a perfect pick-up line?Believe it or not, even though many Japanese people appear to be much thinner than their western counterparts, working out in the gym has only recently started to grow in popularity. But are most Japanese people that you see walking down the street actually fit and in shape?Also, shouldn’t Japanese women be happy that they can stay home with the kids and not work, and is there any real pressure that comes with being a housewife? Can Yumi keep her cool as she patiently tries to educate the guys on the difficulties of being a Japanese woman? Fortunately, the conversation remains very light-hearted while touching upon some fairly sensitive topics. Listen now to compare your own thoughts on what should be considered acceptable in this conservative yet evolving culture.  Follow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Japan is facing critical population-related problems.  Most notably, it has an aging population due to a declining birth rate.  As a result, people in the country are growing increasingly concerned about the future of Japan, the stability of its social insurance programs and, believe it or not, whether or not the Japanese race itself will be around in a couple hundred years.  Despite those concerns, there is some pushback against the immigration programs that the government is introducing in an effort to increase the size of the labor force, and people feel they have stronger reasons not to have more children.  How do these podcasters see these issues affecting their own daily lives in Japan, listen to find out now!Conversation highlights:Chit-chat about the quality of McDonald’s food in Japan versus overseas, and also the very polite service of the Japanese staffThe Sapporo Beer Festival has begun, and it’s interesting to see the large number of families and older couples enjoying the festivalThe Japan government is encouraging companies to hire employees until age 70 due to the labor crunchAfter retiring, many employees work part time at the same company to help supplement their pension income, or to just stay activeJapan’s population has been decreasing for several years, so the government is taking measures to encourage more foreign workers to come to JapanAs the requirements for permanent residency continue to loosen, certain people are obtaining it after living in Japan for only five years, whereas in the past, it was only being approved for people who had been living in Japan for 10 yearsIndividuals designated as “highly-skilled foreign professionals" are able to obtain permanent residency on a fast track of one yearThe number of immigrants in Japan has been increasing for the past six years, with an increase of 167,000 people in the last year, for a total 2.2 million people, or approximately 2% of the total population (For comparison, immigrants in the US make up 14.4% of the population.)Although residents in Japan are required to pay into the national pension system, it is possible to get exemptions or reduce your contribution amount based on your living situation (low income, students, etc.)As some people believe they will not be able to receive pension distributions when they retire, they are not willing to make contributions.  However, the pension system promotes the point of view that pension contributions are meant to support current retirees, not your own future.Burke unsuccessfully tries to compare the decreasing population problem in Japan to the problem of climate changeBen explains that population issues are a no-win situation: the decreasing population problem is creating issues for society, but over-population with the world’s limited resources is also a problemThe conservative mentality of not wanting to dilute the Japanese race and culture may be contributing to the decreasing population problem, and there are concerns that foreigners cannot understand the “Japanese mentality” that is necessary in the workforceWhile Japan has been utilizing immigrant work programs, especially with southeast Asian countries, many of the workers will disappear into society and overstay their visas, and others might be subject to abuse in their jobs or a dangerous work environment 
With October coming to a close, the atmosphere in Japan is building up to one of the favorite events for adults in the country - Halloween!  While it is very rare to see kids trick-or-treating in the streets, adults in Japan can enjoy costume parties at clubs in the city and even in the streets.  The famous Shibuya crossing Halloween party in Tokyo will try to overcome the over-the-top raucous behavior by the thousands of revelers that gather and celebrate around the station by banning alcohol starting from this year.  Eric from Seattle (and long-time resident of Japan) joins the podcast to enlighten Ben and Burke about the costume competitions that take place in nightclubs around Sapporo City, where contest winners can walk away with ¥100,000 in prize money, and all of the other fun ways to celebrate Halloween in Japan!  Enjoy the show!Support the showWebsite:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
On this episode of Voices in Japan, Ben and Burke discuss overtourism in Japan.Tourism in Japan has boomed in recent years. In 2017, it had the highest growth in tourist arrivals, outpacing Vietnam, Chile, and Thailand, with the Chinese being the largest group of visitors. This large influx of travellers has brought some positives to the country, but it has also caused a lot of problems. This episode covers the annoying things that tourists do, complaints from locals (especially of Chinese visitors), what Japan is doing to increase tourism, what local communities can do to benefit, and what not to do when holidaying in Japan.If you enjoy the podcast leave us a rating and review on apple podcasts and leave us a donation by clicking the link in the description.Website:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/YouTube:https://youtu.be/G78DxDtFl-wFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
After the governor of Hokkaido announces a state of emergency in the prefecture due to the worsening situation with the novel coronavirus, Ben and Burke take a look at the actual reaction they are seeing from the people in Sapporo, and the way that the virus has been affecting Japan overall.  Who knew toilet paper would become the next great commodity!?Support the showWebsite:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/YouTubehttps://youtu.be/G78DxDtFl-wFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
Do Japanese people eat sushi every day?  Do they all enjoy eating whale meat and dolphins?  Does everyone in Japan know martial arts?  On this episode, Ben and Burke are joined by Yuki to discuss several stereotypes about Japanese people, and to look at some of the stereotypes that Japanese people have about foreigners based on how life outside of Japan is portrayed in movies.Support the showWebsite:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/YouTubehttps://youtu.be/G78DxDtFl-wFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
The Japanese celebrate New Year's very differently from their counterparts in the west. A lot of people don’t go to parties. They don’t get wasted down at their local bars and clubs, no, no. On New Year’s Eve, most Japanese people stay home with their families, eat traditional food and watch the annual big TV shows. Of course, there is drinking, but New Year’s is a time for resting and relaxing with family members. Also, there are not many countdown parties. Just before midnight on New Year’s Eve, many Japanese visit the local shrine to pray for the coming year. Rock Angel by Joakim Karud https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported— CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/K8eRXvLL7Wo
If you are coming to Japan, are you already set up with a nice living space?  Or are you already living in Japan, and have you ever searched for an apartment on your own?  What kinds of challenges did you face?  Were you treated differently because you were a foreigner?Our podcasters have lived in multiple apartments over their combined 28 years of being in Japan - convenient spots arranged through their companies, apartments haunted by fatalities in the past (a.k.a. jiko bukken), and Burke has recently gone through the process of purchasing his own place.  Apartment hunting is one of the most daunting tasks for life in Japan but probably unavoidable if you plan on being here for more than one or two years.  Listen now to learn about some of the pitfalls and mistakes that are often made by foreigners during the process, and also the requirements for securing a loan in an environment that some are worried might be heading towards a real estate bubble.Conversation Highlights:What types of apartments do schools set up for foreigners teaching English?Why do renters, both Japanese and foreign, need guarantors?What options do renters have for guarantors?Before signing a lease, what do renters need to be very careful about?What are some of the upfront costs, such as "reikin" (礼金) and "shikikin" (敷金)?What did one "kanrigaisha" (管理会社), or management company, try to charge Ben for when he was moving out?What damage costs was Burke able to avoid when moving out simply because he had rented with his Japanese wife?Do foreigners face discrimination when renting in Japan?  Is it justified?What sales techniques do real estate agents use to convince renters to choose an apartment?What spooky discovery did Ben make about one of his apartments?How do Japanese people deal with a problematic neighbor?What are the current mortgage rates in Japan for residents and non-residents?What requirements do banks have for approving loans, particularly for foreigners?What is more important to qualify for a bank loan, income level or job security?What are the requirements for the "atamakin" (頭金) or loan down payment? Real estate is booming these days in Japan, especially in major cities such as Sapporo.  Extremely low mortgage rates have created a red hot buyers market, but is the country headed towards a bubble?  How easy is it for foreigners to get a loan, and what are the requirements?  Find out that information and more in this episode of the podcast!Also if you enjoy the Voices in Japan podcast, please leave a rating and review on iTunes.  It only takes a minute and we would really appreciate it.  And of course, please share us with your friends.Website:http://podcast.voicesinjapan.comFollow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.com
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Podcast Details

Started
Feb 3rd, 2019
Latest Episode
Mar 25th, 2020
Release Period
Weekly
No. of Episodes
61
Avg. Episode Length
41 minutes
Explicit
No

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