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Top Astronomy Podcasts

Année mondiale de l'astronomie 2009

En 2009, le monde entier célèbre l’anniversaire de l’utilisation, il y a 400 ans, de la première lunette astronomique par Galilée. L’astronomie vous intéresse ? Vous souhaitez en savoir plus sur l’eau dans l’Univers, connaître les métiers de l’astronomie, observer le ciel en compagnie des scientifiques ? L’UPMC se mobilise pour faire découvrir cette discipline à tous, avec un programme exceptionnel.

Space in the UK - Audio

Space in the UK' highlights the amazing space science carried out in the UK. Made mainly with a young audience in mind, it explores, among other subjects, an imaginary 'Big Brother' spaceship on a journey to Mars. The film was made with the support of the Science & Technology Facilities Council, and is distributed for free through newspapers and science festivals across the UK.

Cosmological significance and Detection of Gravitational Waves - video

Gravitational waves - a prediction of Einstein's General Relativity - are among the most elusive signals incident on the Earth. These signals - ripples in the curvature of space-time - carry information about what is happening deep in the heart of some of the most violent events in the Universe. However their observation remains one of the most challenging problems in experimental astro-physics, as the measurement sensitivity required by the detectors is equivalent to measuring a change in the separation of the Earth and Sun by the diameter of an atom. A global network of such detectors - LIGO, Virgo and GEO - is now in operation, with enhanced versions being developed, and a space-borne detector, LISA, is planned as a joint ESA/NASA mission. In this talk, Professor Hough will discuss the nature of gravitational waves, their cosmological significance, how the detectors work, and the preliminary results which are already showing promise.

Origin and Evolution of the Universe - Audio

The UCL Institute of Origins – exploring the origin and evolution of the universe, and the origin of life – was launched on 27 February 2009, featuring a talk by Nobel Laureate Professor Sir Paul Nurse. UCL President and Provost Professor Malcolm Grant described the institute as a model for how UCL is organising its intellectual activity, by drawing together individual pockets of expertise around particular research themes. Professor Louise Harra, Director of the UCL Institute of Origins, introduced its four research themes – neutrino physics, planetary science, galaxy evolution and the mathematical foundations of origins – and described collaboration taking places across a variety of research groups: the UCL Astrophysics Group and UCL High-Energy Physics, in UCL Physics & Astronomy; UCL Earth Sciences; UCL Mathematics; and the UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory (UCL Space & Climate Physics). She thanked the UCL Provost’s Strategic Fund for providing support for new researchers and PhD studentships. 2001 Nobel Laureate Sir Paul – who leads the Science Planning Committee of the UK Centre for Medical Research & Innovation (UKCMRI), in which UCL is a partner – is President of Rockefeller University and an amateur astronomer. He spoke on ‘Curiosity & Science’, asserting that curiosity was the motivating factor of the greatest scientists, regardless of whether their research was ‘pure’ or applied. He said that the power to improve the world came from knowledge acquired through curiosity, and that it was important to support science across the board, not just in those areas perceived as approaching application. CERN physicist John Ellis, a UCL Visiting Professor, spoke on ‘Particles & Cosmology’, providing a whistlestop tour of what makes up the universe, how we see or sense it, and what remains to be discovered.

Space in the UK - Video

Space in the UK' highlights the amazing space science carried out in the UK. Made mainly with a young audience in mind, it explores, among other subjects, an imaginary 'Big Brother' spaceship on a journey to Mars. The film was made with the support of the Science & Technology Facilities Council, and is distributed for free through newspapers and science festivals across the UK.

Lunch Hour Lectures - Spring 2008 - Video

Spring 2008 - UCL's Lunch Hour Lecture Series is an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at the university, in bite-size chunks. Speakers are drawn from across UCL and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications. Lunch Hour Lectures require no pre-booking, are free to attend and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.

Cosmological significance and Detection of Gravitational Waves - audio

Gravitational waves - a prediction of Einstein's General Relativity - are among the most elusive signals incident on the Earth. These signals - ripples in the curvature of space-time - carry information about what is happening deep in the heart of some of the most violent events in the Universe. However their observation remains one of the most challenging problems in experimental astro-physics, as the measurement sensitivity required by the detectors is equivalent to measuring a change in the separation of the Earth and Sun by the diameter of an atom. A global network of such detectors - LIGO, Virgo and GEO - is now in operation, with enhanced versions being developed, and a space-borne detector, LISA, is planned as a joint ESA/NASA mission. In this talk, Professor Hough will discuss the nature of gravitational waves, their cosmological significance, how the detectors work, and the preliminary results which are already showing promise.

Origin and Evolution of the Universe - Video

The UCL Institute of Origins – exploring the origin and evolution of the universe, and the origin of life – was launched on 27 February 2009, featuring a talk by Nobel Laureate Professor Sir Paul Nurse. UCL President and Provost Professor Malcolm Grant described the institute as a model for how UCL is organising its intellectual activity, by drawing together individual pockets of expertise around particular research themes. Professor Louise Harra, Director of the UCL Institute of Origins, introduced its four research themes – neutrino physics, planetary science, galaxy evolution and the mathematical foundations of origins – and described collaboration taking places across a variety of research groups: the UCL Astrophysics Group and UCL High-Energy Physics, in UCL Physics & Astronomy; UCL Earth Sciences; UCL Mathematics; and the UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory (UCL Space & Climate Physics). She thanked the UCL Provost’s Strategic Fund for providing support for new researchers and PhD studentships. 2001 Nobel Laureate Sir Paul – who leads the Science Planning Committee of the UK Centre for Medical Research & Innovation (UKCMRI), in which UCL is a partner – is President of Rockefeller University and an amateur astronomer. He spoke on ‘Curiosity & Science’, asserting that curiosity was the motivating factor of the greatest scientists, regardless of whether their research was ‘pure’ or applied. He said that the power to improve the world came from knowledge acquired through curiosity, and that it was important to support science across the board, not just in those areas perceived as approaching application. CERN physicist John Ellis, a UCL Visiting Professor, spoke on ‘Particles & Cosmology’, providing a whistlestop tour of what makes up the universe, how we see or sense it, and what remains to be discovered.

Rayons cosmiques : une autre image de l'Univers

Séminaire grand public sur la physique des rayons cosmiques. De l'histoire de leur découverte à la naissance de la physique des particules puis de l'astroparticule, nous évoquerons l'influence considérable de ce domaine de recherche sur la physique contemporaine. Les observatoires HESS en Namibie et Auger en Argentine illustrerons la quête expérimentale de ces messagers du cosmos.

Lunch Hour Lectures - Spring 2008 - Audio

Spring 2008 - UCL's Lunch Hour Lecture Series is an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at the university, in bite-size chunks. Speakers are drawn from across UCL and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications. Lunch Hour Lectures require no pre-booking, are free to attend and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.

Moon exploration: 40 years on - Audio

In the wake of the Moon landing anniversary celebrations, Professor Smith - himself inspired by the images of Apollo landing on the Moon 40 years ago - describes the UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory's involvement in MoonLite: a project that will employ the latest technologies, undreamt of 40 years ago, to reveal much more about the origin of the moon, the earth and beyond.

Festival des deux infinis

Six conférences pour dresser l’état des lieux de nos connaissances sur l’Univers : sa naissance, sa composition, ses mystères, entre infiniment grand et infiniment petit, quand physique des particules rencontre l’astrophysique.

Stjerneklart

Stjerneklart er en podcast om astronomi og rum(ud)forskning. Nyt afsnit ca. hver tredje uge. Værterne er Louise Dyregaard Nielsen og Troels Lund Laursen.