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Top Rated psychology Podcasts

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Hidden Brain
Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.
Curiosity Daily
The award-winning Curiosity Daily podcast from Curiosity.com will help you get smarter about the world around you — every day. In less than 10 minutes, you'll get a unique mix of research-based life hacks, the latest science and technology news, and more. Hosts Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer will help you learn about your mind and body, outer space and the depths of the sea, and how history shaped the world into what it is today.
Ignorance Was Bliss
Sometimes the only difference between us and them... is who gets a key. Almost anything can seem normal. Are you sure you really want to know?
Sciences Lectures
Inaugural Professorial Lectures, public lectures and events from the Division of Sciences.
Human Rights at the School of Advanced Study
Events in the field of human rights. Image: Maurice Harron 'Reconciliation' Carlisle Square, Derry (1991)
Do we need defence at all? - Video
From international terrorism to foreign crises, natural hazards to cybercrime, Britons hear much about the numerous and impending threats to civil society. Recent events have put these issues on centre stage again, provoking anxious discussion at all levels about what can or should be done. But do these incidents constitute a real and imminent threat to the security of this country and its citizens? If so, what measures can or should be taken by the government in response?
Albie Sachs - From refugee to judge of refugee law - audio
Renowned South African judge and freedom fighter Albie Sachs launched his book 'The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law' with a public lecture in the UCL Bloomsbury Theatre on 26 October 2009. Justice Sachs as twice a refugee from South Africa to the UK. The first occasion, in 1966, followed his detention without charge or trial under the 90-day rule of the apartheid era. After his release, he was immediately rearrested and confined for a further 90 days in solitary confinement. The second time was after the South African secret service placed a bomb in his car in Mozambique in 1988, leading to the loss of an arm and the sight of one eye. In the 1990s he was appointed Judge of the South African Constitutional Court by the then President Mandela. In this podcast, Albie Sachs discusses why he wrote his latest book, the democratic purpose of laughter, and the role universities can play in protecting human rights.
Albie Sachs - From refugee to judge of refugee law - Audio
Renowned South African judge and freedom fighter Albie Sachs launched his book 'The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law' with a public lecture in the UCL Bloomsbury Theatre on 26 October 2009. Justice Sachs as twice a refugee from South Africa to the UK. The first occasion, in 1966, followed his detention without charge or trial under the 90-day rule of the apartheid era. After his release, he was immediately rearrested and confined for a further 90 days in solitary confinement. The second time was after the South African secret service placed a bomb in his car in Mozambique in 1988, leading to the loss of an arm and the sight of one eye. In the 1990s he was appointed Judge of the South African Constitutional Court by the then President Mandela. In this podcast, Albie Sachs discusses why he wrote his latest book, the democratic purpose of laughter, and the role universities can play in protecting human rights.
Developmental Psychology, Fall 2008
UC Davis psychology lecturer Victoria Cross delivers this course on the developmental account of human behavior from conception through adolescence with emphasis on motor skills, mental abilities, motivation, and social interaction.
Launch of the UCL Centre for Ethics & Law - Video
We now live in a 'risk society', pre-occupied with hazards to life and heath. Risk is both negative and positive: risk is both danger and innovation. What is the appropriate balance? Under what circumstances is it acceptable for individuals to be exposed to risks to which they have not consented? How do we encourage socially beneficially risk-taking while avoiding recklessness? How do we frame regulation in order to reduce danger, but support innovation? Appropriate regulation will need to be sensitive to three parties of risk: the beneficiaries of the risky activity; those upon whom the risk is imposed; and those who determine whether the risky action takes place. Regulation will also reflect the fact that often individuals are happy to live with a particular level of risk in their lives,and so will change their behaviour in unexpected ways in response to a changing risk environment.
World in transition: Migration and Trade - for iPod/iPhone
What does it mean to be poor, or an immigrant? What form should Aid take? This album begins to explore the complex issues of international development in a globalised world, starting with a look at schemes which attempt to alleviate poverty. Small business owners are empowered by micro-financing in Glasgow, while in Argentina a disastrous economic collapse has led to people taking matters into their own hands by creating an alternative social exchange currency. Migrant communities, such as Greek Cypriots and Ethiopians in London, and Sierra Leonians in Liverpool, have a chance to reveal the issues they’ve faced; while we also hear from experts who are working to expand the contribution that African migrants abroad can make to Africa’s development. Finally, a Chinese “beer pioneer” and China trade experts discuss issues surrounding China’s membership of the World Trade Organisation.In the bonus material Dr Helen Yanacopulos, Senior Lecturer in International Politics and Development at The Open University, provides insight into the educational value of the audio-visual material and explains the course structure. This material is taken from The Open University Course U213 International Development: Challenges for a World in Transition.
Understanding Identity - Audio
Who are we? What shapes us into the people we are? Over the last 50 years advances in society and technology has meant that we can be whoever we want to be. Infertile couples have the chance of conceiving a child; a man can become a woman; if an organ fails, you can get a new one. But is it all for the greater good? There are people in today's society who wouldn't think twice about putting a patent on our biological and genetic heritage. The tracks on this album discuss issues such as identity, the relationship between the natural and the social sciences, and the colossal topic of ethnicity, especially in the UK. The material forms part of the course DD100, An introduction to the social sciences: understanding social change
Understanding Cities - Audio
At the beginning of the 21st century, more than half the world’s population live in cities. Issues about governance, intensification of social relationships, the impact of globalisation, and the way green spaces are utilised become ever more pressing concerns. The tracks on this album explore some of the challenges faced across the world as citizens and administrators adapt to ever increasing pressures on city spaces and resources. The material forms part of the course DD304, Understanding Cities.
Development Policies for a Changing World - Global Citizenship Lecture - Audio
The second in a series of three lectures jointly organised by UCL and the Commonwealth Secretariat Speakers: Mr Ransford Smith, Commonwealth Deputy Secretary-General, Professor Orazio Attanasio, UCL / IFS Centre for the Evaluation of Development Policies; Chaired by Simon Robinson, Senior Editor, Time Magazine, London
Making Social Worlds - for iPod/iPhone
How does society create and control our social world? How do passports and passbooks function as agents of government control? And what are the purposes of citizenship tests and ceremonies? This album provides insight into how large communities are organised to regulate their social behaviour. People who lived under Apartheid in South Africa describe how their passbook governed their social world, from alcohol consumption to medical health. Philosophers, politicians and academics offer differing perspectives on requirements for citizenship and the importance of citizenship ceremonies in the UK and Australia. In the two audio tracks, course team members Liz McFall and Sophie Watson put the ideas covered in the album into their academic context. This material is taken from The Open University course DD308 Making social worlds.
Black History Month (Audio)
In celebration of Black History Month, the Academy of Achievement presents a host of outstanding African American leaders in the arts, sciences, business, sports and public service. Among the most honored and admired men and women of our times, they include heroes of the Civil Rights movement, trailblazing athletes, brilliant musicians, a pioneering neurosurgeon, a Secretary of State, Pulitzer Prize playwrights, a recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, and a President of the United States. Their words, their music and their stories will enlighten and inspire you to realize the potential that lies within us all. Note: A subset of these tracks is available in SD and HD video. Select SD or HD from the menu on the left to visit the other formats.
Political and Social Sciences - Back to Class with Brown Faculty
The BAA's Back to Class with Brown Faculty programs take you back into the classroom with active scholars on the cutting edge of fascinating topics like Professor James Morone on "Dirty Rotten Secrets of Health Reform" and Professor Ross Levine on "The Continuing, Growing Financial Crisis."
Law & Society
In a time of ever-shifting political and cultural landscapes, McGill prioritizes interdisciplinary research and teaching in public and social policy to stay on top of the world. McGill’s strengths in trans-systemic policy teaching and research reflect a longstanding focus on nation-building and development – an expertise sought by governments, NGOs and policymakers across Canada and internationally.
Conférences
Vous retrouverez ici des conférences données à l'école des mines de Nantes.
Développement durable
L'engagement de l'Ecole des Mines de Nantes dans le développement durable
Swinburne in the media
A collection of television and radio interviews with Swinburne experts.
The Greater Good Podcast
Conversations about the science of a meaningful life, from UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center. Leading researchers and thinkers explore the roots of compassion, happiness, morality, and more. Provocative, enlightening, and inspiring.
Open Days 2011 Audio
Undergraduate Open Days at Trinity College Dublin. Thousands of sixth-year students, parents and teachers from across Ireland and abroad visited Trinity College Dublin’s Open Days on Friday 2nd and Saturday 3rd December 2011 to see presentations on its wide range of undergraduate courses. Over 100 demonstrations and presentations were showcased during the day, highlighting the range of academic options on offer across Trinity College’s three faculties.
Experimental Cognitive Psychology
Stanislas Dehaene received his training in mathematics at the École normale supérieure in Paris, then completed a PhD in cognitive psychology with Jacques Mehler, post-doctoral studies with Michael Posner, as well as neuronal modelling studies with Jean-Pierre Changeux. He has been working since 1997 at the Orsay brain imaging center near Paris (Service Hospitalier Frédéric Joliot of the Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique), where he directs the Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit since 2001. In September 2005 he was elected as a full professor on the newly created chair of Experimental Cognitive Psychology at the Collège de France in Paris. Stanislas Dehaene's interests concern the cerebral bases of specifically human cognitive functions such as language, calculation, and reasoning. The team uses a variety of experimental methods, including mental chronometry in normal subjects, cognitive analyses of brain-lesioned patients, and brain-imaging studies with positron emission tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and high-density recordings of event-related potentials. Formal models of minimal neuronal networks are also devised and simulated in an attempt to throw some links between molecular, physiological, imaging, and behavioral data. Stanislas Dehaene's main scientific contributions include the study of the organization of the cerebral system for number processing. Using converging evidence from PET, ERPs, fMRI, and brain lesions, Stanislas Dehaene demonstrated the central role played by a region of the intraparietal sulcus in understanding quantities and arithmetic (the number sense). He was also the first to demonstrate that subliminal presentations of words can yield detectable cortical activations in fMRI, and has used these data to support an original theory of conscious and nonconscious processing in the human brain. With neurologist Laurent Cohen, he also studied the neural networks of reading and demonstrated the crucial role of the left occipito-temporal region in word recognition (the visual word form area). Stanislas Dehaene is the author of over 100 scientific publications in major international journals. He has received several international prizes including the McDonnell Centennial Fellowship and the Louis D. prize of the French Academy of Sciences (with D. Lebihan). He has published an acclaimed book (The Number Sense), which has been translated in eight languages. He has also edited three books on brain imaging, consciousness, and brain evolution, and has authored two general-audience films on the human brain. He is the associate editor of Cognition, an international journal of Cognitive Science.