Guitarist, songwriter, music junkie
When Alice Cooper recorded "Elected" in 1972, it was a satire about a rich, grandstanding, self-obsessed celebrity running for president. He's a "yankee doodle dandy in a gold Rolls Royce". We all laughed. That kind of thing could never happen in real life, right...?"Elected" (Alice Cooper, Michael Bruce, Dennis Dunaway, Neal Smith & Glen Buxton) Copyright 1973 Ezra Music Corporation, administered by Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC-- This show is one of many great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network. Check 'em all out! And don't forget to subscribe to this show so you never miss an episode!
When Matthew Sweet, Shawn Mullins & Pete Droge (aka The Thorns) recorded "No Blue Sky" almost in 2002, they had no idea that the skies over the Western US would be thick with smoke, or that a global pandemic would isolate us in our homes. "It ain't right, it feels like forever..." pretty much sums up the year 2020. I'm fascinated in how songs can find new relevance years later. Let's listen to this gorgeous song and watch the sun go down together."No Blue Sky" (S. Mullins, P. Droge, M. Altman, G. Phillips) Copyright 2003— This show is one of many podcasts on the Pantheon podcast network -- THE place for music geeks, nerds, junkies & diehards. Or just fans!
Some bands take time to develop a unique sound, but Queen sounded like Queen right from the beginning. "Keep Yourself Alive" was the opening track on their first album, and it contains all the requisite Queen elements: the heavy riffs & orchestrated guitars, the vocal harmonies, dramatic musical shifts and Freddie's powerhouse voice. The band would go on to scale bigger heights, but the magic was there from the start. Let's have a listen."Keep Yourself Alive" (Brian May) Copyright 1972 Queen Music Ltd— This show is one of many great music-related podcasts on the Pantheon network. You should check them out! And remember to subscribe to this show, so you never miss an episode.
Hard to believe now, but Motown resisted releasing this song as a single. Marvin's version sat on a shelf for months before being relegated to an album track-- until some DJ's discovered it, and the rest is history. It became Motown's biggest selling hit at that time. And it's a true classic. In this episode, we'll look at how the track was put together and marvel at Marvin's performance. One of the greats."I Heard It Through The Grapevine" (Norman Whitfield & Barrett Strong) Copyright 1966 Jobette Music Co, Inc., BMIIf you enjoyed this show, please check out these related episodes:https://lovethatsongpodcast.com/aretha-franklin-a-change-is-gonna-comehttps://lovethatsongpodcast.com/the-temptations-i-cant-get-next-to-youhttps://lovethatsongpodcast.com/edwin-starr-warhttps://lovethatsongpodcast.com/earth-wind-fire-shining-starhttps://lovethatsongpodcast.com/stevie-wonder-i-wish-- This show is one of many great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network. Check 'em all out! And don't forget to subscribe to this show so you never miss an episode!
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Creator Details

Episode Count
66
Podcast Count
1
Total Airtime
20 hours, 34 minutes
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 721146