Recent episodes featuring Brian Ardinger
Audrey Crane is author of the new book, What CEOs Need to Know About Design: A business leader's guide to working with designers and a partner at Design Map. Brian Ardinger, Inside Outside Innovation Founder talks with Audrey about some of the trends in Design Thinking, how to hire better designers, and what are some of the differences she's seeing in the Midwest versus the Silicon Valley design scene.Interview Transcript(To read the entire interview transcript, go to http://insideoutside.io)Brian Ardinger: On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Audrey Crane. Audrey is a partner at Design Map and author of the new book, What CEOs need to know about design: A business leader's guide to working with designers. We had a great conversation talking about some of the trends in Design Thinking, how to hire better designers, and what are some of the differences she's seeing in the Midwest versus the Silicon Valley design scene. Now on with the show. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast that brings you the best and the brightest in the world of startups and innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger, founder of InsideOutside.IO, a provider of research events and consulting services that help innovators and entrepreneurs build better products, launch new ideas, and compete in a world of change and disruption. Each week we'll give you a front row seat to the latest thinking, tools, tactics, and trends, and collaborative innovation. Let's get started. Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have another amazing guest. Today with me is Audrey Crane. Audrey is a partner at Design Map and author of a new book called What CEOs need to know about design. Audrey, welcome to the show. Audrey Crane: Thank you so much Brian Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you on the show because you've been recommended by half the people that I know in this design and lean startup space as a person I should have on the show to talk about what's going on. For folks who may not have heard of you, give us a little background on you and how you got into this design space and what's keeping you busy right now. Audrey Crane: My background goes back a while, actually. I studied math in theater in college. I was actually in college when I saw the Mosaic browser for the first time. I was using muds and like old fashioned nerdy stuff like that. I had always worked in high tech though my father and my mother were both computer programmers and so my summer job was QA and stuff like that. I came out to California to act and got a day job at a little company called Netscape. So yeah, happily, most people have still heard of it. I'm still waiting for the day when some young person has not.I was there and I met Hugh Deverly, who was a huge influence on my life, a really big deal. He's not great at self-promoting, but a really big deal inside the design world, and he was a designer by trade and training and kind of showed me the world of design and marriage of right brain and left brain, really worked for me. It really resonated. When he left to start Deverly design office, I went with him and was incredibly lucky to be the first employee there. Was there for quite a while. I left and went internal and ran my own design team and then left again and joined Design Map as a partner nine years ago now. I head up the research arm of Design Map. Many people with lots of experience and skills there, but I pitch in there where I can and then... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Audrey Crane is author of the new book, What CEOs Need to Know About Design: A business leader's guide to working with designers and a partner at Design Map. Brian Ardinger, Inside Outside Innovation Founder talks with Audrey about some of the trends in Design Thinking, how to hire better designers, and what are some of the differences she's seeing in the Midwest versus the Silicon Valley design scene.Interview Transcript(To read the entire interview transcript, go to http://insideoutside.io)Brian Ardinger: On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Audrey Crane. Audrey is a partner at Design Map and author of the new book, What CEOs need to know about design: A business leader's guide to working with designers. We had a great conversation talking about some of the trends in Design Thinking, how to hire better designers, and what are some of the differences she's seeing in the Midwest versus the Silicon Valley design scene. Now on with the show. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast that brings you the best and the brightest in the world of startups and innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger, founder of InsideOutside.IO, a provider of research events and consulting services that help innovators and entrepreneurs build better products, launch new ideas, and compete in a world of change and disruption. Each week we'll give you a front row seat to the latest thinking, tools, tactics, and trends, and collaborative innovation. Let's get started. Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have another amazing guest. Today with me is Audrey Crane. Audrey is a partner at Design Map and author of a new book called What CEOs need to know about design. Audrey, welcome to the show. Audrey Crane: Thank you so much Brian Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you on the show because you've been recommended by half the people that I know in this design and lean startup space as a person I should have on the show to talk about what's going on. For folks who may not have heard of you, give us a little background on you and how you got into this design space and what's keeping you busy right now. Audrey Crane: My background goes back a while, actually. I studied math in theater in college. I was actually in college when I saw the Mosaic browser for the first time. I was using muds and like old fashioned nerdy stuff like that. I had always worked in high tech though my father and my mother were both computer programmers and so my summer job was QA and stuff like that. I came out to California to act and got a day job at a little company called Netscape. So yeah, happily, most people have still heard of it. I'm still waiting for the day when some young person has not.I was there and I met Hugh Deverly, who was a huge influence on my life, a really big deal. He's not great at self-promoting, but a really big deal inside the design world, and he was a designer by trade and training and kind of showed me the world of design and marriage of right brain and left brain, really worked for me. It really resonated. When he left to start Deverly design office, I went with him and was incredibly lucky to be the first employee there. Was there for quite a while. I left and went internal and ran my own design team and then left again and joined Design Map as a partner nine years ago now. I head up the research arm of Design Map. Many people with lots of experience and skills there, but I pitch in there where I can and then do show up in... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Raz Razgaitis, co-founder and CEO of FloWater, talks with Brian Ardinger, Inside Outside Innovation Founder, about the disruption that's happening in the water business, what it's like to be working in a big company and move to a startup, and everything in between.Interview Transcript(To read the entire interview transcript, go to http://insideoutside.io)Brian Ardinger: On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we interviewed Raz Razgaitis. He is the co-founder and CEO of FloWater. We talk about the disruption that's happening in the water business, what it's like to be working in a big company, and move from there to a startup, and everything in between. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast that brings you the best and the brightest in the world of startups and innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, founder of InsideOutside.IO, a provider of research events and consulting services that help innovators and entrepreneurs build better products, launch new ideas, and compete in a world of change and disruption.  Each week we'll give you a front row seat to the latest thinking tools, tactics, and trends, in collaborative innovation. Let's get started. Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have another amazing guest today with me is Raz Razgaitis.  He is the co founder and CEO of FloWater. Raz, welcome to the show. Raz Razgaitis: Thanks Brian. Great to be here. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you on board because you're trying to disrupt this new world of water. So let's start there and talk a little bit about FloWater. Raz Razgaitis: Well, Brian, our whole mantra is really around changing the way the world drinks water. The foundation of our company is to provide decentralized distributed water purification wherever consumers work, rest and play. So that they can have what we believe is the world's best tasting water, on tap, wherever they are. And the purpose behind that is to completely eradicate, not only single use plastic water bottles, which are the new environmental cigarette, but also to provide a pathway to eliminate all packaged water. Because not only does it end up in oceans, lakes, rivers, and landfills. For example, right now, Americans are drinking the equivalent of two credit cards worth of plastics. Microplastics. Wow. Every month as a result of their tap and bottled water. It's not just bottled water, but they're actually drinking their bottled water that's in now microplastics in their tap water. Exactly. We're literally now drinking our plastics, and the whole idea of our company is to completely eradicate that. And what we're doing is we've built a piece of technology and a piece of hardware that right now, it's primarily available to businesses and companies and organizations. And so that's generally hotels, schools, corporations, gyms, retailers, where we provide a FloWater refill station that has a very powerful purification system in it, that takes any tap water effectively anywhere in the world and turns it into something that will be better tasting than your favorite bottled water brand. But it's available in a refillable format so that you are reusing either a multiuse bottle or a refillable bottle, or even a single use bottle that you're refilling. So if you end up having to buy a single use plastic water bottle, but you get to refill that five times, we've just seen an 80% reduction in the usage of single use packaging, which is a great thing. To read the entire interview transcript, go to acast.com/privacy
Raz Razgaitis, co-founder and CEO of FloWater, talks with Brian Ardinger, Inside Outside Innovation Founder, about the disruption that's happening in the water business, what it's like to be working in a big company and move to a startup, and everything in between.Interview Transcript(To read the entire interview transcript, go to http://insideoutside.io)Brian Ardinger: On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we interviewed Raz Razgaitis. He is the co-founder and CEO of FloWater. We talk about the disruption that's happening in the water business, what it's like to be working in a big company, and move from there to a startup, and everything in between. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast that brings you the best and the brightest in the world of startups and innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, founder of InsideOutside.IO, a provider of research events and consulting services that help innovators and entrepreneurs build better products, launch new ideas, and compete in a world of change and disruption.  Each week we'll give you a front row seat to the latest thinking tools, tactics, and trends, in collaborative innovation. Let's get started. Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have another amazing guest today with me is Raz Razgaitis.  He is the co founder and CEO of FloWater. Raz, welcome to the show. Raz Razgaitis: Thanks Brian. Great to be here. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you on board because you're trying to disrupt this new world of water. So let's start there and talk a little bit about FloWater. Raz Razgaitis: Well, Brian, our whole mantra is really around changing the way the world drinks water. The foundation of our company is to provide decentralized distributed water purification wherever consumers work, rest and play. So that they can have what we believe is the world's best tasting water, on tap, wherever they are. And the purpose behind that is to completely eradicate, not only single use plastic water bottles, which are the new environmental cigarette, but also to provide a pathway to eliminate all packaged water. Because not only does it end up in oceans, lakes, rivers, and landfills. For example, right now, Americans are drinking the equivalent of two credit cards worth of plastics. Microplastics. Wow. Every month as a result of their tap and bottled water. It's not just bottled water, but they're actually drinking their bottled water that's in now microplastics in their tap water. Exactly. We're literally now drinking our plastics, and the whole idea of our company is to completely eradicate that. And what we're doing is we've built a piece of technology and a piece of hardware that right now, it's primarily available to businesses and companies and organizations. And so that's generally hotels, schools, corporations, gyms, retailers, where we provide a FloWater refill station that has a very powerful purification system in it, that takes any tap water effectively anywhere in the world and turns it into something that will be better tasting than your favorite bottled water brand. But it's available in a refillable format so that you are reusing either a multiuse bottle or a refillable bottle, or even a single use bottle that you're refilling. So if you end up having to buy a single use plastic water bottle, but you get to refill that five times, we've just seen an 80% reduction in the usage of single use packaging, which is a great thing. To read the entire interview transcript, go to acast.com/privacy
Stuart Willson is the CEO and founder of Radicle, a research and advisory company that has worked with great companies like Lego, Diageo, Proctor and Gamble, and more. Brian Ardinger, Inside Outside founder talks with Stuart about the new trends in the world of research, how companies are using information and data to make better decisions, and about the new venture model that companies like Prehype are using to create startups from scratch.  Interview TranscriptBrian Ardinger: On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Stuart Willson. Stuart is the CEO and founder of a company called Radicle. It's a research and advisory company that has worked with great companies like Lego, Diageo, Proctor and Gamble, and more. In our interview, you'll hear some insights about the new trends in the world of research, how companies are using information and data to make better decisions, and we talk a lot about what's the new venture model that companies like Prehype are using to create new startups from scratch.  Have a listen.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast that brings you the best and the brightest in the world of startups and innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger, founder of InsideOutside.IO, a provider of research events and consulting services that help innovators and entrepreneurs build better products, launch new ideas, and compete in a world of change and disruption.Each week we'll give you a front row seat to the latest thinking tools, tactics, and trends and collaborative innovation. Let's get started. Welcome to another episode of inside, outside innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have another amazing guest with us today is Stuart Willson. He is the cofounder and CEO of Radicle, a new research and advisory business. He's here to talk about some of the changes and trends that he's seeing. Stuart, welcome to the show. Stuart Wilson: Thank you for having me. Brian Ardinger: I am so excited to have you back. You were at the IO Summit and you had a great talk about some of the new trends that you're seeing.  Before we jump into that and talking about Radicle, I want to talk about how you got into the innovation space cause it's a little bit different than your traditional entrepreneur. Stuart Wilson: I like to say I have a fairly nontraditional background relative to my peers and by which, I mean I had a pretty traditional background for most of my career. I worked and investment banking out of college. I went and got my MBA and then I was looking for a job where I've been learning a lot and be challenged and get paid to be right. And I ended up at a hedge fund and for 11 years. I was an investor investing everything from media to ski resorts and ultimately starting my own fund with a partner. But then as is often the case in New York, my circle of friends shifted somewhat and I was introduced to and became friends with a group of people that included folks like Ben Leventhal who just sold Resy to Amex and my friend Josh Abramson, who had started College Humor, friends who were at places like Spark and Union Square, and I was the only person sitting up on Park Avenue, looking at a Bloomberg machine. And the more time I spent with them and the more I listen to what they're doing, the more I felt like I was really wasting my time and that there was this transformation happening as waves of new technologies created opportunities and democratized business building.But I wasn't participating in that and I wasn't really doing anything that I felt was driving value or utility for our... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Stats
Episode Count
324
Podcast Count
2
Total Airtime
4 days, 16 hours