Even a big country like the United States can't efficiently produce everything we need and want The third and final installment in our economic series focuses on how U.S. post-World War II "leadership" in the international system and burgeoning global economy has shaped U.S. strategy ever since. C. Richard Neu and Joel Hillison discuss how the U.S. once served as the exemplar of prosperity that other nations desired to follow, such that it was tolerant of its economic struggles so long as it maintained its abilities to set the rules and establish order. This position is now being challenged by actors who follow different rules, which has led to a loss of American confidence in the global economy. How does uncertainty in the global economy affect the U.S. national security interests, and therefore the U.S. military?     C. Richard Neu is a Professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and a former senior economist at RAND. Joel Hillison is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Bin Li, CEO of Chinese electric vehicle start-up NIO Inc., celebrates after ringing a bell as NIO stock begins trading on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) during the company’s initial public offering (IPO) at the NYSE in New York, U.S., September 12, 2018. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
The real competitive strength of the U.S. is in our [political and economic] system, particularly the interaction between the two. The politics generally keeps its hands off. C. Richard Neu, former economist at RAND and U.S. Army War College Professor Joel Hillison return to the WAR ROOM studio for the second installment of our podcast series on economics and strategic leadership. "Preserving Peace Through Economic Strength" looks at the uneasy nexus between U.S. grand strategy and its economic instrument of power. While America's strategic position is strong and has withstood challenges from other emerging powers for the past decade, it is because of a hands-off (rather than hands-on) approach toward its economic development. This has implications for economic stability both at home and abroad, and for America being able to use economic incentives to foster partnerships and influence opponents.   C. Richard Neu is a Professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and a former senior economist at RAND. Joel Hillison is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image Credit: Poster of then-Presidential Candidate McKinley's campaign courtesy the National Archives. Background picture of cash from pexels.com (public domain). Image assembled by Tom Galvin.
For the past decade or so, the economics profession has been scratching its head hard to figure out why has [the engine of U.S. production] started to falter? Without question, the state of the U.S. economy shapes the conversation between national leaders and the military over strategies, requirements, and capabilities. But economics is not a true science and therefore it can be difficult to understand the meaning behind economic indicators and the impacts on policy. This podcast leads off a three-part series on the intersection of economics and politics at the national level to help frame on-going discussions. Why does significant growth not necessarily lead to a stronger economy, and what does the level of the federal debt really mean? These and other topics are discussed by C. Richard Neu, former economist at RAND and U.S. Army War College Professor Joel Hillison.   C. Richard Neu is a Professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and a former senior economist at RAND. Joel Hillison is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: PXhere.com (released to public domain)
Share Profile
Are you C.? Verify and edit this page to your liking.

Share This Creator

Recommendation sent

Join Podchaser to...

  • Rate podcasts and episodes
  • Follow podcasts and creators
  • Create podcast and episode lists
  • & much more

Creator Details

Episode Count
3
Podcast Count
1
Total Airtime
1 hour, 7 minutes
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 354144