Julius Tillery has innovative thoughts on Cotton.... On his website, he says "Black Cotton, a company that is going to change the game for you, me, all of us. Black Cotton comes from us, and is meant for us! For many years, cotton was the number one crop our people produced in the South, by our hands and feet, for no wage or compensation. After the Emancipation Proclamation, many of our ancestors made mere pennies off of the cotton produced from sharecropping. What’s worse, for the amount of money that’s made in the same industry today, black cotton farms are still making just pennies compared to the billions earned by their counterparts. I grew up in this system of poverty cotton farming. My farm home county of Northampton County in North Carolina is one of the poorest performers of economic health in the state by county, but it’s also ranked number two in the state for cotton production. Are we raising crops for our communities to suffer? As a black farmer, it has been depressing to see each year go by with farming communities struggling and deteriorating, while our efforts continue to be exploited across the world for others to profit."   we look forward to our discussion about how business is going, and what he feels the future is like for Black Farmers...    The number to call is 6466688393 and we hope that you wil tell your friends and family to join us in this discussion on black farming and it's merits and benefits...Who knows we might even motivate someone into farming Also joining us will be Charles Phaneuf of one of our premiere theatre companies....I first met Charles when he was a student from D.C. coming down to work at Durham Arts Council and have been impressed by his work ever since.. ......... 
Julius Tillery has innovative thoughts on Cotton.... On his website, he says "Black Cotton, a company that is going to change the game for you, me, all of us. Black Cotton comes from us, and is meant for us! For many years, cotton was the number one crop our people produced in the South, by our hands and feet, for no wage or compensation. After the Emancipation Proclamation, many of our ancestors made mere pennies off of the cotton produced from sharecropping. What’s worse, for the amount of money that’s made in the same industry today, black cotton farms are still making just pennies compared to the billions earned by their counterparts. I grew up in this system of poverty cotton farming. My farm home county of Northampton County in North Carolina is one of the poorest performers of economic health in the state by county, but it’s also ranked number two in the state for cotton production. Are we raising crops for our communities to suffer? As a black farmer, it has been depressing to see each year go by with farming communities struggling and deteriorating, while our efforts continue to be exploited across the world for others to profit."   we look forward to our discussion about how business is going, and what he feels the future is like for Black Farmers...    The number to call is 6466688393 and we hope that you wil tell your friends and family to join us in this discussion on black farming and it's merits and benefits...Who knows we might even motivate someone into farming Also joining us will be Charles Phaneuf of one of our premiere theatre companies....I first met Charles when he was a student from D.C. coming down to work at Durham Arts Council and have been impressed by his work ever since.. ......... 
Julius Tillery has innovative thoughts on Cotton.... On his website, he says "Black Cotton, a company that is going to change the game for you, me, all of us. Black Cotton comes from us, and is meant for us! For many years, cotton was the number one crop our people produced in the South, by our hands and feet, for no wage or compensation. After the Emancipation Proclamation, many of our ancestors made mere pennies off of the cotton produced from sharecropping. What’s worse, for the amount of money that’s made in the same industry today, black cotton farms are still making just pennies compared to the billions earned by their counterparts.I grew up in this system of poverty cotton farming. My farm home county of Northampton County in North Carolina is one of the poorest performers of economic health in the state by county, but it’s also ranked number two in the state for cotton production. Are we raising crops for our communities to suffer? As a black farmer, it has been depressing to see each year go by with farming communities struggling and deteriorating, while our efforts continue to be exploited across the world for others to profit."   we look forward to our discussion about how business is going, and what he feels the future is like for Black Farmers...   The number to call is 6466688393 and we hope that you wil tell your friends and family to join us in this discussion on black farming and it's merits and benefits...Who knows we might even motivate someone into farmingAlso joining us will be Charles Phaneuf of one of our premiere theatre companies....I first met Charles when he was a student from D.C. coming down to work at Durham Arts Council and have been impressed by his work ever since........... 
Off the Record: Groove in the Garden Charles Phaneuf and Adam Lindstaedt stopped by WKNC to discuss this year’s Groove in the Garden Festival, hosted at the Raleigh Little Theater and sponsored by The Pour House Music Hall. September 22nd, 2018. Doors: 1:30, Show: 2:15. Special guest appearance and in-studio performance from Emily Musolino, Durham-based guitarist playing this year’s festival. Listen Here
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Creator Details

Location
Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America
Episode Count
6
Podcast Count
6
Total Airtime
7 hours, 57 minutes
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 445386