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Chris Martin

Host, Producer & Editor of Getting Work To Work
Chris Martin is a curiosity builder, filmmaker, and award-winning educator obsessed with creativity and curiosity. He is also the producer and host behind Getting Work to Work, a weekly podcast for creative entrepreneurs. He loves stories that are filled to the brim with heart, edge, and fearlessness, and can’t get enough of real people living their authentic and unique lives.

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Recent episodes featuring Chris Martin
Wield the Power of Co-Creation! (GWTW316)
Getting Work To Work
In an upcoming interview episode, I had the pleasure of talking with David S. Kidder, co-author of New to Big, and The Intellectual Devotional, and something he said blew my mind: Everything he does is co-created with people who are more talented or passionate than he is. This got me thinking about how much effort I put on a daily basis to create the work I do, by myself. And naturally, questions filled my mind. In this episode of Getting Work To Work, I’m going to explore seven questions that help me consider and incorporate the spirit of co-creation into my daily practice. Seven questions that help me consider and incorporate the spirit of co-creation into my daily practice: How much better would my work be in a spirit of co-creation? What could possibly be brought to life if I moved to a model of co-creation? What are the stumbling blocks and barriers in moving to co-creation? How is co-creation different than building a team? Who can I co-create with now? Who do I want to co-create with in the future? Will my ego let me do it? Show Links The (Seven Deadly) Curiosity Killers Getting Work To Work (@gwtwpodcast) on Twitter Chris Martin (@cmstudios) on Twitter Sign up for my weekly newsletter: The Curiosity Lab The post Wield the Power of Co-Creation! (GWTW316) appeared first on Chris Martin Studios.
Inspiration is Hard Work (GWTW315)
Getting Work To Work
“How do you stay inspired?” is one of my favorite questions to be asked and to ask others. Everyone has their own tricks and tips to navigate the endless sea of information and experiences in today’s digital landscape. But something that is not talked about enough is the fact that inspiration is hard work. The speed at which technology and our creative industries change is breathtaking. Just when we think we’ve got a handle on our jobs—bam!—something new to consider. There is so much new content being created every single day, where do we begin? When have we accumulated enough inspiration for us to finally sit down and get to work? Quotes mentioned in this episode: From Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All by Tom Kelley and David Kelley: “Ask yourself, what can you do to increase your ‘deal flow’ of new ideas? When was the last time you took a class? Read some unusual magazines or blogs? Listened to new kinds of music? Traveled a different route to work? Had coffee with a friend or colleague who can teach you something new? Connected to ‘big idea’ people via social media? To keep your thinking fresh, constantly seek out new sources of information” (p. 81). “…you can choose to be creative. But you have to make an effort to stay inspired and turn creativity into a habit” (p. 82). Eight ways to grow your inspiration-building habits: Invest time in seeking out new experiences, ideas, people, and classes. Explore the unknown areas surrounding what is known. Focus on what matters and impacts your work the most. Take time to do something new every day. Embrace the challenge, pain, and struggle that can and will accompany the effort to grow your inspiration-building habits. Ask someone for a book or podcast recommendation and then actually read or listen to it. Establish a routine for setting the stage for both inspiration and creativity. Remember that getting back to work and using what you’ve learned requires discipline to shut off the flow of ideas and inspiration. Show Links Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All by Tom Kelley and David Kelley MIT OpenCourseWare Romeo Drive by Kevin Max Kid A by Radiohead Photo by Sebastian Pena Lambarri on Unsplash The (Seven Deadly) Curiosity Killers Getting Work To Work (@gwtwpodcast) on Twitter Chris Martin (@cmstudios) on Twitter Sign up for my weekly newsletter: The Curiosity Lab The post Inspiration is Hard Work (GWTW315) appeared first on Chris Martin Studios.
“The Business Case for Love” with Steve Farber (GWTW314)
Getting Work To Work
If love is the most powerful force in the universe, why do we often leave it out of work? This is the question that Extreme Leader Steve Farber answers in his upcoming book, Love is Just Damn Good Business: Do What You Love in the Service of People Who Love What You Do. In this interview episode of Getting Work To Work, Steve and I explore the business case for love and how it’s the ultimate competitive advantage as we move forward into the future. We also touch on his background in creativity from singing songs to writing books, how he brings his creativity to the stage when speaking, and what he has learned about the impact of his work on others over the years. Show Links Steve Farber Love is Just Damn Good Business: Do What You Love in the Service of People Who Love What You Do by Steve Farber John Prine The Brothers Koren The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations by James Kouzes and Barry Posner Tom Peters Happy Money: Zen philosophy for a happier and more prosperous life by Ken Honda The Obstacle is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph by Ryan Holiday Photo by Sergey Zolkin on Unsplash Getting Work To Work (@gwtwpodcast) on Twitter Chris Martin (@cmstudios) on Twitter Sign up for my weekly newsletter: The Curiosity Lab The post “The Business Case for Love” with Steve Farber (GWTW314) appeared first on Chris Martin Studios.
But Do You Have To? (GWTW313)
Getting Work To Work
As a solo business owner, do I really need to be on social media? I know I’m not alone in asking this question, but I’ve been thinking about it more and more. Fueled by the book New to Big by David Kidder and Christina Wallace, I’m going to explore the question in its root form: Do I really need to be? It can be anything you think you need to be—from social media and email newsletters to search engine optimization and finding the right combination of content creation and strategy. As creative entrepreneurs, we need to be more proactive in challenging our assumptions about what we need to be, in order to truly be who we are. Quotes mentioned in this episode: From New to Big by David Kidder and Christina Wallace: “Expire Your Data”: “Data more than a year old needs to be revalidated. And forecasting beyond three years is intellectually dishonest, because the technology and business models are unknowable beyond that horizon” (p. 53). “Why could this work now? What is true about the world today that could make it viable?” (pp. 53-54) “As a growth leader, it’s your responsibility to encourage your teams to question and test the strongly held views and assumptions that support day-to-day business. ‘This is how we’ve always done it’ is a death knell. Burn the rule book, expire the data, and look at the problem with fresh eyes” (p. 54). From Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All by Tom Kelley and David Kelley: “But innovation—whether driven by an individual or a team—can happen anywhere. It’s fueled by a restless intellectual curiosity, deep optimism, the ability to accept repeated failure as the price of ultimate success, a relentless work ethic, and a mindset that encourages not just ideas, but action” (p. 74). Show Links New to Big by David Kidder and Christina Wallace Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All by Tom Kelley and David Kelley Photo by Branislav Belko on Unsplash The (Seven Deadly) Curiosity Killers Getting Work To Work (@gwtwpodcast) on Twitter Chris Martin (@cmstudios) on Twitter Sign up for my weekly newsletter: The Curiosity Lab The post But Do You Have To? (GWTW313) appeared first on Chris Martin Studios.
Creative Jealousy (GWTW312)
Getting Work To Work
You ever have one of those moments where you find yourself completely jealous of a friend for doing their creative work? This weekend, I found myself in a weird mood as I passively watched every single Instagram story about the project. In that state of jealousy, I began noticing other people making short films over the weekend for the 48 Hour Film Project. It’s like when you want to buy a car and start seeing it everywhere (this is known as the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon). I was seeing these creative projects all over the place! What was I doing wrong? Well for one, sitting on my couch, watching other people create, instead of getting up and doing something about it. Oh, the power of creative jealousy. Six positive questions to ask yourself when faced with creative jealousy: What have I created in the past? What am I creating now? What am I dreaming of creating in the future? How much time are you spending bringing your work to life? What is one step I can take today? Who can I reach out to for encouragement or collaboration? Show Links What’s the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon? Photo by Mika on Unsplash The (Seven Deadly) Curiosity Killers Getting Work To Work (@gwtwpodcast) on Twitter Chris Martin (@cmstudios) on Twitter Sign up for my weekly newsletter: The Curiosity Lab The post Creative Jealousy (GWTW312) appeared first on Chris Martin Studios.
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Stats
Location
Vancouver, WA, USA
Episode Count
318
Podcast Count
1
Total Airtime
5 days, 5 hours