Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center.
The Army prides itself on being able to learn, but it also has shown throughout history it also forgets pretty quick too. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Brian Linn and Conrad Crane to discuss the inter-war periods throughout U.S. history and what they've meant to the further development of the U.S. Army. WAR ROOM Senior Editor JP Clark joins them to look at how post-war versus pre-war mindsets have guided leadership over time. Brian Linn is a Professor of History and the Ralph R. Thomas Professor in Liberal Arts, at Texas A&M University. He specializes in military history and war and society in the 20th century. Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. COL JP Clark is a student in the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College and a WAR ROOM Senior Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: American servicemen and women gather in front of “Rainbow Corner” Red Cross club in Paris to celebrate the conditional surrender of the Japanese on August 15, 1945. Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo
I see [Jomini] as one of the final products of the Enlightenment -- the idea of this ability to find scientific principles ... that anyone can use, [such as] in this case, war In this episode in our Great Strategists series, U.S. Army War College historians Bill Johnsen and Con Crane present one of the more enigmatic figures in military theory, Baron Antoine-Henri Jomini. Historians have given Jomini mixed reviews in terms of evaluating his theories and contributions, but almost all recognize his influence. Modern analysts often pit Jomini and his contemporary, Carl von Clausewitz, as polar opposites, creating "Jominian" and "Clausewitzian" camps. In reality, both were informed by their experiences with the Napoleonic Wars, but they took different perspectives--Clausewitz from the Prussian perspective, Jomini from the French. And while Clausewitz died in 1831, Jomini lived to be an old man and prolific writer, so you can see elements of Clausewitzian thought in Jomini's writing. Still, Jomini was interested in finding general principles of warfare that could translate directly to success on the battlefield; a task that seemed simple when he could draw from observations of Napoleon's greatest victories. Bill and Con tell Jomini's story, contributions to theories of war and relations with other thinkers, and the contemporary relevance of his ideas. WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Bill Johnsen recently retired as Professor at the U.S. Army War College. Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM.   Other releases in the "Great Strategists" series: HOW MUCH FOR THE PEN? SCHELLING (GREAT STRATEGISTS)A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTSMAHAN AND SEA POWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 4)KAUTILYA, THE ARTHASHASTRA, AND ANCIENT REALISM — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 3)SUN TZU AND THE ART OF WAR — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 2)ON CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ – GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 1)
You cannot help but approach your sources from your own experiences and backgrounds Our three-part roundtable on the "Lessons" of History concludes as Con Crane, Jacqueline E. Whitt, and Andrew A. Hill discuss the importance of critical thinking for developing historical mindedness. From the subjectivity of first-person accounts to the modern phenomenon of so-called "fake news," what is presented as definitive history is almost assuredly not. How can a historical mindset help individuals sort out what information is valid or not? How can we construct useful and clear understandings of what happened in the past?     Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: The first page of the Aesinas manuscript of Tacitus's Germania. View the codex here.
You cannot help but approach your sources from your own experiences and backgrounds Our three-part roundtable on the "Lessons" of History continues as Con Crane, Jacqueline E. Whitt, and Andrew A. Hill discuss the roles of military historians in professional military education and the practical uses of military history in general. If history doesn't teach clear lessons, what use is it to policymakers and leaders? To what extent has military history become insular and disengaged from the policy arena? Have historians ceded the field of practical application to political scientists? And to what extent has the need for novel ideas caused historians to succumb to commercial temptations, rather than clear, critical analysis based on evidence?     Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Ulysses Grant reviewing proofs of his memoirs, June 27, 1885, just weeks before his death. Source: Library of Congress.
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Creator Details

Episode Count
7
Podcast Count
1
Total Airtime
2 hours, 37 minutes
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 776682