Debbie is a clinical psychologist in Denver, Colorado, and a cohost of Psychologists Off the Clock
Pandemic, online school, social distancing, climate change… this is an especially difficult time for adolescents, who are already in a transitional time of life. Dr. Louise Hayes is one of the world’s foremost experts on using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Adolescents. She joins us on the podcast for the second time, to talk about her new book for adolescents, and share her thoughts on helping adolescents cope with today’s challenges. Listen and LearnThe unique challenges of the pandemic for adolescents, and how they can cope.Why losses associated with the pandemic, even seemingly small ones, are real. Why we should all be listening to what adolescents have to say.About the concept of “active hope.”Louise Hayes’s thoughts about bullying and procrastination. How to take small steps toward self-care during difficult times.How to go from “zombieland” to “vitalityland.”About Dr. Louise HayesDr. Louise Hayes is a clinical psychologist who is well known for her work using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for young people in schools and clinical settings. She is a former president of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science. Dr. Hayes is an author, international speaker, a senior fellow with The University of Melbourne and Orygen Youth Health, and a peer-reviewed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy/Training (ACT) trainer. Dr. Hayes is the co-author of the The Thriving Adolescent: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Positive Psychology to Help Teens Manage Emotions, Achieve Goals, and Build Connection. Her newest book is called Your Life, Your Way: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Skills to Help Teens Manage Emotions and Build Resilience. Together with Joseph Ciarrochi, she conducts research and treatment development; her latest work uses a DNA-v (Discoverer-Noticer-Advisor-Values) treatment model for young people. Louise is also an active humanitarian, taking mental health professionals into the Himalaya to developing their mindfulness skills and raising funds for poor children in remote Nepal.Resources:Your Life, Your Way: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Skills to Help Teens Manage Emotions and Build Resilience https://amzn.to/3iTWEva Praxis DNA-V online training with Louise Hayes: https://www.praxiscet.com/events/dna-v/The Thriving Adolescent: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Positive Psychology to Help Teens Manage Emotions, Achieve Goals, and Build Connection https://amzn.to/31fZvsu Sherry Turkle Reclaiming Conversation https://amzn.to/3laC3VJ Related Psychologists Off The Clock EpisodesHelping Adolescents Thrive with Dr. Louise Hayes: https://www.offtheclockpsych.com/podcast/helping-adolescents-thriveParental Burnout with Dr. Lisa Coyne: https://www.offtheclockpsych.com/podcast/parental-burnoutThank you for joining us on this episode of Psychologists Off The Clock.Like what you’re hearing? Support us on Patreon.We appreciate your feedback. Please take a moment to leave a quick rating and review of the show on Apple Podcasts. It helps us spread the word to more folks like you!Subscribe for free where you listen to podcasts: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Deezer, iHeartRadio, TuneIn, PandoraPlease note the information on Psychologists Off The Clock is intended for informational purposes only. It should not be used as a substitute for psychological or medical care. If you are looking for professional help, visit our resources page for guidance on how to find a therapist. If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, call 9-1-1.
Healthcare professionals usually choose their careers because patient care is meaningful; most want to make a positive impact and help others. However, with a broken healthcare system and unending occupational stressors, burnout is all-too-common, sometimes resulting in tragic consequences. Join Debbie for Part 2 of a rich two-part series with health psychologist Dr. Abbie Beacham, a clinical psychologist/trauma expert Dr. Kerry Makin-Byrd, and Dr. Bernard Chang, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Columbia University, on the wellbeing of healthcare providers. Part 2 is about strategies for refueling for the deeply meaningful work providers do.Listen and Learn (Part 2):Strategies, strategies, strategies…The power of micro-moments – like the 20-second handwash!How to embrace the wobble board of a busy life.The importance of saying yes to basic needs, and why providers’ basic needs matter too!How to put pragmatic mindfulness to work for you.The benefits of self-compassion (and ways to sneak some in).About Dr. Abbie Beacham:Dr. Abbie BeachamAbbie Beacham, PhD is a Clinical Psychologist who has spent her career working in healthcare and medical settings. She has her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Louisville. Dr. Beacham also completed her internship in Clinical Health Psychology at the University of Florida Health Sciences Center and Post-doctoral Fellowship at the University of Kentucky Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry. Over the past four years she has worked extensively with physicians and other healthcare professionals across the Rocky Mountain Region addressing their stress, burnout and well-being.  As part of this work, she collaborated with colleagues to develop and implement evidence-based well-being programs for health professionals. Her most recent training “Cultivating Personal Resilience” has been presented to hundreds of professionals in both in-person and online formats. Dr. Beacham recently relocated from University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, CO to assume the position of Director of Behavioral Science at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry in Louisville, KY. She is co-founder of Project Well-Being where she continues to do presentations, trainings and online well-being programs to audiences large and small. A licensed psychologist in Colorado and Kentucky (provisional) she maintains a small private practice serving healthcare professionals via online consultation and therapy. In her spare time, she can be found hanging out with her family or pedaling her road bike (“Ruby”) among the birds, trees and streams in Kentucky and Colorado.  Her guilty pleasure is searching the world over for the best cup of coffee (medium-dark roast please).About Dr. Kerry Makin-Byrd:Dr. Kerry Makin-ByrdDr. Kerry Makin-Byrd is a clinical psychologist on a mission to help professionals create deep, meaningful lives. She uses evidence-based therapy and coaching to foster resilience, mindfulness, and purpose-driven work.  Dr. Makin-Byrd received her Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University, and subsequently received advanced training at the University of California San Francisco and Stanford University. She has held professional appointments at the National Center for PTSD and at New York University. She has served as a researcher and national subject matter expert on trauma and PTSD, and has authored over 30 peer-reviewed studies, Congressional reports, and clinical chapters on trauma and resilience. She received the Special Contribution Award from the Veterans Health Administration in recognition of the national impact of her policy contributions and clinical teaching on VA mental health services. Kerry is a founding board member of the Kids Compassion Project, volunteers with the Dumb Friends League, and enjoys hiking with her husband and daughter.  About Dr. Bernard Chang:Dr. Bernard ChangDr. Bernard Chang is Vice Chair of Research and an Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Columbia University.  A practicing emergency physician and psychologist, he studies mental health and neurologic emergencies. During the COVID crisis, he has been working clinically on the frontlines as an emergency physician, while also conducting ongoing research on the biobehavioral effects of COVID-19 on both patients and frontline workers. He received his PhD from Harvard in psychology, his MD from Stanford and completed his Emergency Medicine residency training at the Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Resources:A collection of resources to promote Healthcare Professional Wellbeing – including apps, practices, articles, and podcast episodes.Healthcare Wellbeing CollectiveECHO Colorado, a health care professional resilience program in Colorado and neighboring statesChoice Point Values ExerciseWriting a Letter to Yourself Compassion Exercise by Kerry Makin-ByrdYael’s personal experience with burnoutDebbie’s personal experience with burnout”Covid-19 is pushing doctors to the brink. Medicine needs to recognize they’re human and need help.”. Washington Post opinion piece by Esther Choo“Physicians Aren’t ‘Burning Out.’ They’re Suffering from Moral Injury” STAT Article July 26, 2018 by Simon T Talbot and Wendy Dean Standing at the Edge: Finding Freedom Where Fear and Courage Meet by Joan HalifaxVideo on Provider Burnout and Resilience featuring Abbie BeachamRelated Psychologists Off The Clock Episodes153. Healthcare Professional Wellbeing (Part 1) with Drs. Abbie Beacham, Kerry Makin-Byrd, and Bernard Chang152. Helping the Helpers with Dr. Susan David105. The Self-Care Prescription with Dr. Robyn Gobin147. Extending Compassion w/ Dr. Janina Scarlet & Sara Schairer118. Moral Injury and Shame with Dr. Lauren Borges and Dr. Jacob FarnsworthThank you for joining us on this episode of Psychologists Off The Clock.Like what you’re hearing? Support us on Patreon.We appreciate your feedback. Please take a moment to leave a quick rating and review of the show on Apple Podcasts. It helps us spread the word to more folks like you!Subscribe for free where you listen to podcasts: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Deezer, iHeartRadio, TuneIn, PandoraPlease note the information on Psychologists Off The Clock is intended for informational purposes only. It should not be used as a substitute for psychological or medical care. If you are looking for professional help, visit our resources page for guidance on how to find a therapist. If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, call 9-1-1.
Healthcare professionals usually choose their careers because patient care is meaningful; most want to make a positive impact and help others. However, with a broken healthcare system and unending occupational stressors, burnout is all-too-common, sometimes resulting in tragic consequences. Join Debbie for Part 1 of a rich two-part series with health psychologist Dr. Abbie Beacham, a clinical psychologist/trauma expert Dr. Kerry Makin-Byrd, and Dr. Bernard Chang, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Columbia University, on the wellbeing of healthcare providers. Part 1 is an exploration of issues related to healthcare professional wellbeing, both before and during the era of COVID-19. Listen and Learn (Part 1): About the occupational stressors and systemic factors in medicine that contribute to burnout.The impact of COVID-19 on healthcare professional wellbeing.Why mental health symptoms are higher among physicians than the general public.The physical health impacts of working in medicine.Why a multi-pronged approach to healthcare professional wellbeing is key.  About Dr. Abbie Beacham: Dr. Abbie Beacham Abbie Beacham, PhD is a Clinical Psychologist who has spent her career working in healthcare and medical settings. She has her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Louisville. Dr. Beacham also completed her internship in Clinical Health Psychology at the University of Florida Health Sciences Center and Post-doctoral Fellowship at the University of Kentucky Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry. Over the past four years she has worked extensively with physicians and other healthcare professionals across the Rocky Mountain Region addressing their stress, burnout and well-being.  As part of this work, she collaborated with colleagues to develop and implement evidence-based well-being programs for health professionals. Her most recent training “Cultivating Personal Resilience” has been presented to hundreds of professionals in both in-person and online formats. Dr. Beacham recently relocated from University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, CO to assume the position of Director of Behavioral Science at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry in Louisville, KY. She is co-founder of Project Well-Being where she continues to do presentations, trainings and online well-being programs to audiences large and small. A licensed psychologist in Colorado and Kentucky (provisional) she maintains a small private practice serving healthcare professionals via online consultation and therapy. In her spare time, she can be found hanging out with her family or pedaling her road bike (“Ruby”) among the birds, trees and streams in Kentucky and Colorado.  Her guilty pleasure is searching the world over for the best cup of coffee (medium-dark roast please). About Dr. Kerry Makin-Byrd: Dr. Kerry Makin-Byrd Dr. Kerry Makin-Byrd is a clinical psychologist on a mission to help professionals create deep, meaningful lives. She uses evidence-based therapy and coaching to foster resilience, mindfulness, and purpose-driven work.  Dr. Makin-Byrd received her Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University, and subsequently received advanced training at the University of California San Francisco and Stanford University. She has held professional appointments at the National Center for PTSD and at New York University. She has served as a researcher and national subject matter expert on trauma and PTSD, and has authored over 30 peer-reviewed studies, Congressional reports, and clinical chapters on trauma and resilience. She received the Special Contribution Award from the Veterans Health Administration in recognition of the national impact of her policy contributions and clinical teaching on VA mental health services. Kerry is a founding board member of the Kids Compassion Project, volunteers with the Dumb Friends League, and enjoys hiking with her husband and daughter.   About Dr. Bernard Chang: Dr.
Criminal Justice Reform is an important, and often overlooked element of Racial Justice. In the U.S., Black men are significantly more likely to be incarcerated. Individuals in the criminal justice system are likely to experience inhumane and dehumanizing practices, including solitary confinement. Severe social isolation can have a harmful long-term impact on physical and mental health.  In this eye-opening episode, Debbie speaks with Taylor Pendergrass, an ACLU lawyer dedicated to criminal justice reform and co-editor of Six by Ten: Stories from Solitary. The book includes a collection of the rarely heard personal stories of people who have experienced long-term solitary confinement. In the episode, Taylor and Debbie discuss mental health, incarceration, and why we need to end the dehumanizing practice of long-term solitary confinement in the United States.  Listen and Learn: Why solitary confinement is used in the U.S, and why long-term solitary confinement is a problem.About “SHU syndrome,” and the long-lasting psychological and physical effects of isolation on humans. Why mental health units are a more effective, humane alternative.What conditions are like in solitary confinement cells. What we can learn from European prison systems.How you can help promote criminal justice reform!  About Taylor Pendergrass Taylor Pendergrass Taylor Pendergrass is a lawyer and activist who works on criminal justice reform for the ACLU. He has spent over a decade collecting stories of people who have been impacted by the criminal justice system. Along with Mateo Hoke, Taylor co-edited the book Six by Ten: Stories from Solitary which, through personal history narratives gives readers a better understanding of the horribly dehumanizing impact of solitary confinement on people’s lives. Taylor has a BA in Environmental Policy from Duke University and earned his law degree from the University of Colorado Law School.  Resources Six by Ten: Stories from Solitary by Taylor Pendergrass and Mateo HokeDebbie's unabridged interview of Taylor Pendergrass on The New Books Network13th, a documentary directed by Ava DuVernay on NetflixThe New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander “I Begged Them to Let Me Die”: How Federal Prisons Became Coronavirus Deathtraps by Keri Blakinger and Keegan Hamilton, The Marshall Project, June 18, 2020 “Coronavirus Cases Rise Sharply in Prisons Even as They Plateau Nationwide” by Timothy Williams, Libby Seline and Rebecca Griesbach, New York Times, June 16, 2020 ‘People are Sick All Around Me’: Inside the Coronavirus Catastrophe in California Prisons by Sam Levin, The Guardian, May 20, 2020 NY Times articles (here and here) about solitary confinement in Colorado by Rick RaemischPen Pal program with people in solitary confinementAn overview of research on the psychological impact of solitary confinement by Craig Haney, Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz 144. Healing Racial Trauma with Dr. Kristee Haggins (Re-Release from June 2019)
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Creator Details

Birthdate
Sep 24th, 1974
Location
Denver, Colorado, United States of America
Episode Count
74
Podcast Count
2
Total Airtime
2 days, 19 hours
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 775073