Diana Martinez is currently the Education Director of Film Streams, a non-profit arthouse organization in Omaha, Nebraska. She has a PhD in film and media studies from the University of Oregon. While there, she taught classes in film history, media aesthetics, and writing. Diana has also written for Slate, The Atlantic, and Women in Hollywood, among others. Her research focuses on the intersection of stardom, race, and gender. She's presented at international media studies conferences and was most recently the invited speaker at the Kenefick Humanities Luncheon at Creighton University.
This is episode 2 of Sonic Cinema: a series looking at a few starring history’s most iconic musicians. Today — The Making of The Bodyguard. All episodes of Hollywood in Color are heavily researched. Here are the major sources used for this episode: Whitney directed by Kevin Macdonald (documentary) Whitney: "Can I Be Me?" directed by Nick Broomfield and Rudi Dolezal (documentary) Romance and Rights: The Politics of Interracial Intimacy, 1945-1954 by Alex Lubin (book) Interracial Romance as a Staged Spectacle in "Made in America," "Bringing Down the House" and "Guess Who" by Helene Charlery (article) Working Girls: Gender and Sexuality in Popular Cinema (Chapter 8: Music, Video, Cinema: Singers and Movie Stars) by Yvonne Tasker Whitney Houston 1963-2012 by Robin Roberts (article) Nationality, Race, and Gender on the American Pop Charts: What happened in the '90s? by Alan Wells (article) Whitney is Every Woman: Cultural Politics and the Pop Star by Marla Shelton (article) Divafication: The deification of modern female pop stars by Linda Lister (article) A Vision of Love: An Etiquette of Vocal Ornamentation in African-American Popular Ballads of the Early 1990s by Richard Rischar (article) ‘Not black enough’: the identity crisis that haunted Whitney Houston by Steve Rose (TheGuardian.com) Remember When Whitney Houston Got Booed for Being Too White? by Rich Juzwiak (Gawker.com) The Two Voices of Whitney Houston by Doreen St. Félix (NewYorker.com) The Complexities of Whitney Houston in “Whitney” by Michael Schulman (NewYorker.com) The Soul of Whitney by Joy Duckett Cain (Essence Magazine, December 1990) transcribed by ClassicWhitney.com Whitney Houston talks about the men in her life — and the Rumors, Lies and Insults that are the High Price of Fame by Lynn Norment (Ebony Magazine, May 1991) archived by Google Books Sing to Me: My Story of Making Music, Finding Magic, and Searching for Who's Next by LA Reid (book) Diana Ross: A Biography by J. Randy Taraborrelli (book) Erased Onscreen: Where Are All the Interracial Couples? by Kevin Noble Maillard (NYTimes.com) Music used in this episode (listed in order heard): Theme song (intro and outro): Hombre (Instrumental) by Kevin J. Simon (marmosetmusic.com) Waltz Opus Posthume by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue) Toothless Slope by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue) In the Back Room by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue) Spins and Never Falls by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue) Tyrano Theme by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue) White Limit by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue) Faster Faster Brighter by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue) Sunday Lights by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue) Destiny Awaits (Instrumental) by Pat Daugherty (marmosetmusic.com) Media Cited: clip from Guess Who's Coming to Dinner? (1967) directed by Stanley Kramer You Give Good Love by Whitney Houston Saving All My Love For You by Whitney Houston How Will I Know by Whitney Houston Greatest Love of All by Whitney Houston I Wanna Dance With Somebody by Whitney Houston Didn’t We Almost Have it All by Whitney Houston So Emotional by Whitney Houston Where Do Broken Hearts Go by Whitney Houston Best Female Single '89 from Soul Train Awards uploaded by beyonceitis (youtube.com) Interlude: Pledge by Janet Jackson Rhythm Nation by Janet Jackson Rhythmless Nation from In Living Color uploaded by Mr. Wonder (youtube.com) I'm Your Baby Tonight by Whitney Houston Arsenio Hall interviews Whitney Houston from The Arsenio Hall Show [aired January 4, 1991] uploaded by ZanDTV (youtube.com) The Bodyguard (1992) - Interview - Part 1 from MTV's The Big Picture uploaded by mariah (youtube.com) I Will Always Love You by Whitney Houston David Foster Story behind Whitney Houston's I Will Always Love You from ABC News Nightline [aired February 2012] uploaded by vSpirit2 (youtube.com) clip from The Bodyguard (1992) *Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research Hollywood in Color artwork designed by Shelby Moring Follow Hollywood in Color on all social media @hwoodincolor and visit the show at hollywoodincolor.org
All episodes of Hollywood in Color are heavily researched. Here are the major sources used for this episode: Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory by Deborah Paredez (book) Dance and the Hollywood Latina: Race, Sex, and Stardom by Priscilla Ovalle (book) Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music: The Limits of La Onda (Chapter 5: Giving us that Brown Soul) by Deborah Vargas (book) From Bananas to Buttocks: The Latina Body in Film and Popular Culture (Chapter 7: The New Wave of Border Crossing) by Tara Lockhart (book) Selena's Good Buy: Texas Mexicans, History, and Selena Meet Transnational Capitalism by Raul Coronado Jr. (article) Jennifer as Selena: Rethinking Latinidad in Media and Popular Culture by Frances R. Aparicio (article) The Chicana/Latina Dyad, or Identity and Perception by Alicia Gaspar de Alba (article) Jennifer's Butt by Frances Negron-Muntaner (article) Brain, Brow, and Booty: Latina Iconicity in U.S. Popular Culture by Isabel Molina Guzman and Angharad N. Valdivia (article) Meet Danielle Camastra, the Woman Who Almost Played Selena Quintanilla by Kiko Martinez (remezcla.com) Anything for Selenas: How a Teenage Fan Convinced her Dad to Make the Selena Movie by Vanessa Erazo (remezcla.com) Music used in this episode (listed in order heard): Theme song (intro and outro): Hombre (Instrumental) by Kevin J. Simon (marmosetmusic.com) Amarilla Maracuyá by Animal Chuki (marmosetmusic.com) Guiton Sketch by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Guitare 1 by Monplaisir (freemusicarchive.org) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Maree by Kai Engel (freemusicarchive.org) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Accralate by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Sancho Panza Gets a Latte by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Media Cited: Selena National Casting Call, San Antonio — Raw footage (1996) by Fred Miller (texasarchive.org) Cumbia beats taken from Latin Beats: The Cumbia Style on Drums I Reverb Drum Lesson with Daniel Villarreal by Reverb.com (youtube.com) Techno Cumbia (album version) & Techno Cumbia (remix) by Selena Eva Longoria at the Hollywood Walk of Fame Ceremony by Variety.com (youtube.com) Archival news footage from Channel 6 News uploaded by Joseph97 (youtube.com) Archival new footage from CBS 4 News Rio Grande Valley uploaded by author (youtube.com) clip from Selena (1997) Amor Prohibido (album version) by Selena Selena Amor Prohibido (Acapella) published by TheAcapellas (youtube.com) *Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research Hollywood in Color artwork designed by Shelby Moring Follow Hollywood in Color on all social media @hwoodincolor and visit the show at hollywoodincolor.org
All episodes of Hollywood in Color are heavily researched. Here are the major sources used for this episode: Hattie McDaniel: Black Ambition, White Hollywood (book) by Jill Watts Hattie: The Life of Hattie McDaniel (book) by Carlton Jackson Cinema Civil Rights: Regulation, Repression, and Race in the Classical Hollywood Era (book) by Ellen Scott Making Movies Black: The Hollywood Message Movie from WWII to the Civil Rights Era (book) by Thomas Cripps Black Culture and the New Deal: The Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era (book) by Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff Beulah and the Moynihan Report (article) by Gerald R. Butters From Blackface to Beulah: Subtle Subversion in Early Black Sitcoms (article) by Mack Scott Race, Class, and Gender in Beulah and Bernie Mac (article) by Angela Nelson Star Dances: African-American Constructions of Stardom, 1925-1960 (book chapter) by Arthur Knight Toms, Coons, Mulattoes, Mammies, and Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films (books) by Donald Bogle Music used in this episode (listed in order heard): Theme song (intro and outro): Hombre (Instrumental) by Kevin J. Simon (marmosetmusic.com) Bummin on Tremolo by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Love Her by Loyalty Freak Music (freemusicarchive.org) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Comic Plodding by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Nostalgic Piano by Rafael Krux (freepd.com) — Public Domain Remember the Time We Used to Play by Kumiko (freemusicarchive.org) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Ave Marimba by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License The Boats We've Been On by smallertide (freemusicarchive.org) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Danse Morialta by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Porch Blues by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Pepper's Theme (full mix) by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Steps by Sunne (marmosetmusic.com) Media Cited: Clips from various Academy Award speeches (youtube.com) *Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research Hollywood in Color artwork designed by Shelby Moring Follow Hollywood in Color on all social media @hwoodincolor and visit the show at hollywoodincolor.org
All episodes of Hollywood in Color are heavily researched. Here are the major sources used for this episode: Hattie McDaniel: Black Ambition, White Hollywood (book) by Jill Watts Hattie: The Life of Hattie McDaniel (book) by Carlton Jackson Scarlett, Rhett, and A Cast of Thousands: The filming of Gone with the Wind (book) by Roland Flamini Memo from David O. Selznick (book) by David O. Selznick White Robes, Silver Screens: Movies and the Making of the KKK (book) by Tom Rice Gone with the Wind: Black and White in Technicolor (article) by Ruth Elizabeth Burks The Rise of the Ku Klux Klan Right-Wing Movements and National Politics by Rory McVeigh Race and the Cloud of Unknowing in Gone with the Wind (article) by Patricia Yeager The Black Reaction to Gone with the Wind (article) by JD Stevens The African American Press' Reception of Gone with the Wind (article) by James Tracy Music used in this episode (listed in order heard): Theme song (intro and outro): Hombre (Instrumental) by Kevin J. Simon (marmosetmusic.com) The Wait by how the night came (freemusicarchive.org) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Pepper's Theme (full mix) by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Caught the Feeling (Instrumental) by SNVRS (marmosetmusic.com) Anamalie by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Reflection by how the night came (freemusicarchive.org) — Looped — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Ghostpocalypse 8 Epilog by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Poppers and Prosecco by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License To Move An Inch by Steve Combs (freemusicarchive.org) — Looped — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License July by Kai Engel (freemusicarchive.org) — Looped — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Danse Morialta by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) — Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Media Cited: "Banning Gone with the Wind" September 2017, The View Interview with Lennie Bluett, "Race and Hollywood," May 2006 by Turner Classic Movies Gone with the Wind (1939) Hattie McDaniel Winning Best Supporting Actress (1940) *Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research Hollywood in Color artwork designed by Shelby Moring Follow Hollywood in Color on all social media @hwoodincolor and visit the show at hollywoodincolor.org
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Creator Details

Birthdate
Jan 27th, 1987
Location
Omaha, NE, USA
Episode Count
11
Podcast Count
1
Total Airtime
5 hours, 35 minutes
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 924492