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Harry Campbell

Harry Campbell is an engineer, owner, founder and host of The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.
Recent episodes featuring Harry Campbell
RSG106: Virtual Kitchens With Matt Newberg of HNGRY
The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash
Uber Eats is one of Uber’s fastest growing business segments right now, but they’re not the only ones trying to tackle the future of food and technology. Today’s guest is the perfect person to help us dissect a new concept gaining steam: virtual kitchens. If you’re curious about what’s going on behind the scenes of the food and tech world, stay tuned! If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here. Intro Today I’m talking with Matt Newberg of HNGRY.TV New media venture exploring the impact of technology on our relationship with food We’re going to talk about virtual kitchens, macro trends and more Intro to Matt Newberg Matt Newberg is the host and producer of HNGRY, a content series exploring the impact of technology on our relationship with food Spend the last 8 years working in the tech industry as an entrepreneur Worked at Vimeo Bringing his passion for food to explore emerging field of food tech What are Virtual Kitchens? Two forms – existing restaurants creating virtual only brands out of existing infrastructure Second type – cloud kitchen, virtual delivery, online delivery Currently more dedicated ‘virtual’ kitchen space right now vs existing brick and mortar Uber has really pushed this for the last few years Macro Trends in the Food + Tech Space Rise in number of people eating outside the home/having food prepared outside the home Delivery/pickup is eclipsing dining in a restaurant Fast casual brands are doing the best (not McDonalds, not fine dining, middle tier restaurants) Delivery apps Expose into Virtual Kitchens HNGRY.TV first episode (link in show notes) Expose into the world of virtual kitchens –  two major players Trend around shared kitchens for various purposes (new companies, packaged goods, delivery, etc) Cloud Kitchens funder – Travis Kalanick, founder of Uber Basically, companies are buying up property in urban areas and stocking it with everything from kitchens but also regular, everyday products (toilet paper, tomato sauce, etc.) and turn it into a delivery hub Why are Virtual Kitchens so Important? One, potential for tech companies to get in the space, see if they can make it profitable for them Two, options for mom and pop companies to try out becoming a restaurant by renting space first Delivery options Restaurant tours Future Impact of Virtual Kitchens Smaller restaurants/shops that don’t have a brand or serve for convenience will suffer Affect on labor – fewer workers needed. Estimated 85% of service workers will lose their jobs and not be replaced Restaurants are going to need to become more savvy at marketing, maybe even partner with other restaurants (white label delivery service?) Outro Big thanks to Matt for coming on the podcast – looking forward to his next episode on THC infused beer and the alcohol industry! Really interesting space – you can tell from the interview he’s passionate about the intersection of food and tech – make sure to check out his YouTube video below Big opportunities for rideshare, micromobility, delivery and more with these types of services Show Notes HNGRY.tv fast(er) food – First HNGRY YouTube Video. HNGRY YouTube Channel UberEats is using data to create cool, non-existent restaurants If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here. The post RSG106: Virtual Kitchens With Matt Newberg of HNGRY appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.
RSG105 How Uber Got Into Micromobility with Tortoise Founder Dmitry Shevelenko
The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash
Uber’s come a long way since its humble beginning as a black car service. Now Uber is getting into all kinds of projects, including Uber Eats, Uber Air, Health, Freight and more. However, out of all of these projects, the one I’m most interested in is micro-mobility, like e-scooters, e-bikes and more. Today, I’m talking to someone heavily involved in the micromobility sphere. We’ll cover everything from Uber’s entrance into micromobility, the opportunities in this area, and more. Intro Today I’m talking with Dmitry Shevelenko, the co-founder and president of Tortoise, a new company helping micro-mobility operators Before founding Tortoise, Dmitry worked for Uber – specifically Uber’s mobility efforts like Jump bikes and more We’ll be talking about Dmitry’s perspective on the industry, investment decisions and more We’ll also be talking about his new company, Tortoise, which combines AI and teleops to help scooter fleets reposition, rebalance and recharge Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here! Intro to Dmitry Shevelenko Dmitry Shevelenko is cofounder and president of Tortoise, a new startup helping micromobility operators automate the repositioning of their vehicles Before founding Tortoise, Dmitry was an advisor to leading mobility and future of work startups, and he also had a 4 year stint at Uber working as the Director of Business Development He initiated many of the company’s new mobility efforts, including the Jump partnership and acquisition and Uber Transit Focused on the whole package of Uber and mobility: rideshare, transit, micromobility and short term car rentals Decision to Leave Uber Variety of factors, but began to see the trend was in short trips – doesn’t exactly make sense to use a car for all of these short, less profitable trips Perfect fit for micromobility options Opportunity in a burgeoning industry, lots of investment and he had an interest in the topic Understanding Micromobility Utilization rate of scooters Additional cost of scooters, cost of scooters and Juicers/Chargers, etc Uber and Lyft introduced predictability and reliability not only in the rideshare space, but also in the micromobility space Startup Company: Tortoise High and low end of building scooters Not a hardware company – provide designs, etc. Operators pay per subscription to have access to software and more Teleops is a game changer Micromobility in Action First market will be suburbs, college campus Less dense areas actually better – more dense areas like cities typically have enough micromobility options Outreach to communities that don’t have these opportunities Outro Big thanks to Dmitry for coming on the podcast – excited to talk to him about his experiences at Uber, his perspective on micromobility and his company, Tortoise Excited to have more people on the podcast to talk about micromobility! Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here! Show Notes Zum Smart City Atlanta Expo @TortoiseHQ on Twitter If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here. The post RSG105 How Uber Got Into Micromobility with Tortoise Founder Dmitry Shevelenko appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.
RSG104: Enter the Dojo with Jay Cradeur!
The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash
There’s something special about the audio medium that makes it very different from written or visual mediums. It’s more personal – podcasts typically accompany you for 30-40 minutes and over the months, you get to know the podcaster (and their terrible jokes!). As you may know, we recently launched a new podcast called The Rideshare Dojo. To celebrate, I’m taking you behind the scenes today of what it takes to start a podcast. If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here. Intro Today I’m handing over the mic to Jay Cradeur to talk all about his new podcast, The Rideshare Dojo We’ll go behind the scenes of how to start a podcast, what it takes, and the partnership between the Dojo and RSG The Rideshare Guy podcast has transitioned more into a rideshare and mobility industry podcast The Dojo is a podcast that comes from the driver and worker’s perspective Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here! Intro to The Rideshare Dojo Jay Cradeur is a senior contributor at The Rideshare Guy and recently started The Rideshare Dojo podcast Process of starting a podcast – not as easy as it looks! Break down the moving parts of starting a podcast and launching it What’s Your Podcast All About? First, you need a name for your podcast! Not as easy as it sounds 🙂 Have to get clear on your topic, write a description For the Dojo, wanted to focus on driving, entrepreneurship, drivers’ Plan Bs Audience that wanted to learn, put their knowledge to use Software is important – easiest to use (and free) podcasting software: Audacity Creating Artwork and Intro/Outro The artwork for a podcast is that square image you see when your favorite podcast pops up with a new episode You can’t do anything without including that piece of artwork Intro/outro – the beginning and ending of podcasts, like music, you/a narrator introducing what the podcast is about Used Fiverr to hire people for design, intro/outro Get Ready to Interview! Next biggest step is to interview people! First person I interviewed was Harry Campbell, then daughter Paulina Wasn’t until I started interviewing that I realized this is harder than it seems – takes focus and practice Don’t worry about being amazing on your first episode – no one is going to be great at the first thing they do, just keep practicing The Tech Side of Podcasting Need to set up your podcast in Simplecast and create a trailer (think movie trailer, but audio: get people excited about your podcast!) Once your podcast is in Simplecast, you can connect it to share it on other platforms, like Apple, Stitcher, Spotify, etc. Overall, getting started with a podcast can be fairly low-tech. It can be more expensive/intensive, but getting started doesn’t take expert know-how or expensive gear Finding Sponsors for Your Podcast Not all podcasts have sponsors, and not all new podcasts can find sponsors However, it’s worth it to pitch to sponsors (as long as they fit your audience) because companies are always looking to get in front of new audiences This is when the partnership with Harry happened, he helped with the business side Find a sponsor that aligns with your audience and pitch, pitch, pitch – it can’t hurt and can help you fund some of the starting expenses for a podcast Outro Big thanks to Jay for coming on the podcast and sharing a behind the scenes look at The Rideshare Dojo! You can subscribe to the Dojo using the links below If you have any ideas for Jay or want to be interviewed, reach out to him directly using the Dojo link below! Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here! Show Notes Zum Audacity Simplecast Podbean Fair Rideshare Dojo Rideshare Dojo on Apple Podcasts The Rideshare Guy Instagram If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here. The post RSG104: Enter the Dojo with Jay Cradeur! appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.
RSG103: Grayson Brulte on the Public Perception of Autonomous Vehicles
The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash
Even though AVs have been in the news a lot over the past few years, the industry is really still in its infancy. In this episode, I’m chatting with someone who’s on the other side of autonomous vehicles, dealing with things like public perception, helping human drivers and more. We’ll cover the politics of AVs, the social impacts and more – you won’t want to miss this episode! If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here. Intro Today I’m chatting with Grayson Brulte, co-founder/President of Brulte & Company, a consulting firm that specializes in design innovation and tech strategies for the global marketplace We’re talking all about AVs and specifically Uber’s AV program, what Lyft is up to and how automation is affecting other industries We’ll also talk about how automation may affect the salaries of workers, everyone from truck drivers to rideshare drivers Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here! Interview with Grayson Brulte Grayson Brulte is an autonomous vehicle consultant – passionate about public acceptance and adoption of autonomous vehicles Believes AVs are the future of transportation Working on public acceptance of AVs – show how AVs benefit and enhance society vs detract from society A bit early to say which companies are leading overall in terms of AVs – some companies are focused on aspects of AVs, like Amazon, Ford, etc. Working in the AV Sector Brulte & Company focuses across the sector, works with more than one company – every company is working on AVs in some aspect Walmart will become a leader in autonomy for one reason: brand After serving the customer, AVs should be the next thing you consider as an executive Figuring out the logistics Public Perception of AVs One focus is to highlight the different types of jobs AVs will create Crucial for companies to engage with the public every step of the way – can’t create an amazing car but have the public hate it The biggest challenge with public perception of AVs is misinformation – getting people into AVs to see for themselves is important Cities, Regulation and AVs Some states are friendlier to developing AV technology – Florida California not as friendly (more regulatory hurdles for businesses) Difficult to pass helpful legislation if you don’t know the technology very well Important to realize there will be challenges along the way, but there were challenges with flight (airplanes) too Outro Big thanks to  Grayson for coming on the podcast – I appreciate his viewpoint about AVs, particularly what companies are doing It’s interesting to see how many aspects of life/business AVs touch – so many people working behind the scenes on AVs AVs re going to have a big impact on society at large and mobility in general Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here! Show Notes Sponsor Zum Sam Walton: Made in America Grayson on Twitter @gbrulte #RoadToAutonomy // Walmart & Autonomous Vehicles Grayson on YouTube Autonomous Tomorrow RSG090: Tim Lee Updates us on the True State of Self-Driving Car Technology! If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here. The post RSG103: Grayson Brulte on the Public Perception of Autonomous Vehicles appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.
RSG102: Fair CEO Scott Painter on Rideshare, Cars and Uber
The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash
One of the best parts about rideshare driving is the low barrier to entry, meaning people of any age, gender, race can sign up and drive for companies like Uber and Lyft. However, one pretty expensive barrier to entry can be the vehicle you drive for rideshare. Today, I’m talking to the CEO of Fair, Uber’s official vehicle partner to talk about what it’s like to supply cars to thousands of drivers. If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here. Intro Today I’m chatting with Scott Painter, CEO of Fair, about the automotive side of the rideshare business Scott’s the perfect person to talk about this with, since he’s at the intersection of rideshare and the automotive industry Scott has founded three different automotive tech companies and will talk about where he sees the rideshare side of the business going in the future This episode is sponsored by Zum, a rideshare service for kids. Work on your own schedule and make up to $32/hr. Learn more about Zum and sign up here. Interview with Scott Painter Founder and CEO of Fair Serial entrepreneur Seeks to solve problems, like car ownership, with technology When working on Fair, engineers and other employees were constantly trying to make the process ‘fair’, name stuck and became Fair Naming the company Fair set the tone for everything they did and continue to do Fair Big idea is that people don’t have to borrow money to get access to mobility People are going into debt to buy cars, not great for depreciating assets People with low credit, no credit, etc. were getting penalized for it – with Fair, we’re letting you borrow a car (with stipulations) – anyone can get access to mobility What About Autonomous Cars? Preposterous to say autonomy is going to change anything in the near term for Uber/Lyft Autonomy will come in waves – cars will get safer It’s great from a safety point of view, but Uber and Lyft will need human drivers for a very long time At the same time, people’s lives are changing – Fair doesn’t lock them into years-long terms, like car ownership once did What Makes Fair Different Key is to not buy brand new cars and offer them to drivers – cars depreciate immediately when you drive them off the lot Get the right drivers behind the wheels of the right cars Manufacturers are taking in more lease returns than ever before – creates an oversupply situation and used car prices drop Drivers don’t have to worry about maintenance, but Fair does – Fair makes sure to get reliable cars with low mileage because they don’t want additional expenses either Working with Rideshare Drivers & Uber Right now, more rideshare than the consumer side Trying to eliminate friction for drivers with the first week free program Rideshare drivers are committed to providing great service and solving problems It can be difficult making sure enough cars are available – demand from Uber drivers is huge Outro Big thanks to Scott for coming on the podcast and sharing his knowledge on the automotive tech sector Big fan of Fair, and I hope you are after listening to this podcast – offers flexible rentals and leases Wanted to show you what it’s like for a company like Fair – drivers can have one perspective of it, but they don’t see everything that goes on behind the scenes, particularly the supply and demand of cars This episode is sponsored by Zum, a rideshare service for kids. Work on your own schedule and make up to $32/hr. Learn more about Zum and sign up here. Show Notes If you’d like to sign up with Fair, please use our affiliate links below CA drivers – click here to sign up using our link and get your first week free! You can learn more about the Uber Fair Rental California program here. Drivers in other state – click here to download the Fair App and get $100 off your Fair car rental  enter code “RSG100” at checkout) If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here. The post RSG102: Fair CEO Scott Painter on Rideshare, Cars and Uber appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.
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Stats
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA
Episode Count
111
Podcast Count
3
Total Airtime
3 days, 7 hours