This post may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, Soma Games earns a small percentage from qualifying purchases at no additional cost to you, but all of our recommendations and opinions are our own.Welcome to the Soma SoulWorks Podcast! This podcast serves to help people, particularly those who may label themselves as "creatives," to seek wholeness and calling so they are ready to embrace the mission God has for them. Consider this podcast a rogue harmony of professional development and self-care, hosted by John Bergquist and Chris Skaggs.What’s covered in this episode: In part three of the series, Brandon, Mark, Neil, and Chris reflect on “An Achievement Guide For Redemptive Game Developers” and its list of seven sins and the virtues that counteract them. This episode covers “pace over pressure”.“Resist and reject the culture of crunch on principle. Instead of endless, unquestioned productivity, we practice the rhythm of work and rest and regular filtering for value over volume.We dig into our need to grow in all the dimensions of our being human, heart soul mind and strength. And we commit to take one full day every week for rest from our daily work and make sabbath possible for everyone within our sphere of authority.”“In every industry these days, the crunch is a cultural mindset.” Mark says. If you’re not working, there’s an underlying feeling that it’s time wasted. There’s this concept that if you aren’t working toward something, then you aren’t valued, which is actually not what God says. We’re loved and valued by God by just being.Work can be its own form of escapism; real life is too hard. We avoid rest to avoid thinking and feeling what needs to be thought and felt. Learning to rest isn’t always easy. “Even though I was physically still, there was still a mindset that needed to be quieted. And it’s taken practice…” Mark explains that he had to go to the Father asking for his spirit to be calmed.Sabbath is one of the ten commandments, and rest is intrinsically important to our beings. “Rest” from work can just as much mean “play”. Use your rest time to do the life-giving things you can’t do on a work day. That might be quiet time, or it might be going for a hike. Neil reminds us that rest time isn’t purely to recover, it’s to enjoy the fruits of your labor. God didn’t need to rest after his six days of creation, but he took the seventh day to enjoy what he had made. You need that moment.Resources mentioned:Sign up for the Tempus Divum newsletter Email us ideas, questions, or suggestions at tempusdivum@somagames.com
This post may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, Soma Games earns a small percentage from qualifying purchases at no additional cost to you, but all of our recommendations and opinions are our own.Welcome to the Soma SoulWorks Podcast! This podcast serves to help people, particularly those who may label themselves as "creatives," to seek wholeness and calling so they are ready to embrace the mission God has for them. Consider this podcast a rogue harmony of professional development and self-care, hosted by John Bergquist and Chris Skaggs.What’s covered in this episode: In part two of the series, Brandon, Mark, Neil, James, and Chris reflect on “An Achievement Guide For Redemptive Game Developers” and its list of seven sins and the virtues that counteract them. This episode focuses on “connection over isolation”.“Instead of individualism and isolation facilitated and encouraged by screens and controllers, we practice the presence of others IRL. With a special effort to share a space with those who are not part of our work, we pursue diversity across class, gender, and ethnicity in our friendships, partnerships, and mentoring relationships.”Video games are highly incentivized environments; they present a no-risk, quick-reward system. They’re easy escapism with effective reward loops. It’s like in theater—embodying a character has the same low-risk, high reward system.A video game’s escapism is that much more tempting in a world where we’re faced with so much trauma and tragedy.The Soma team discusses the history of the female player demographic and female representation in games—how the industry ignored its female players and largely objectified their characters. While this has never necessarily been remedied, Brandon observes, women are now exploited as an audience as well as the rest of gamers; the industry realized it could be profiting from them.We’re in a unique stage in history where diversity and equality are pushed and encouraged, as scriptures has expressed it should be. Galatians 3:28 (ESV) reads, “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”Resources mentioned:Sign up for the Tempus Divum newsletter “The Only Guide to Gamergate You Will Ever Need to Read” by The Washington Post“The WHO is recommending video games as an effective way to stop the spread of COVID-19, one year after adding 'gaming disorder' to its list of addictive behaviors” by Business InsiderEmail us ideas, questions or suggestions at tempusdivum@somagames.com
This post may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, Soma Games earns a small percentage from qualifying purchases at no additional cost to you, but all of our recommendations and opinions are our own.Welcome to the Soma SoulWorks Podcast! This podcast serves to help people, particularly those who may label themselves as "creatives," to seek wholeness and calling so they are ready to embrace the mission God has for them. Consider this podcast a rogue harmony of professional development and self-care, hosted by John Bergquist and Chris Skaggs.What’s covered in this episode: In this series introduction, Brandon, Mark, Neil, and Chris reflect on “An Achievement Guide For Redemptive Game Developers” and its list of seven sins and the virtues that counteract them:Pace over pressureConnection over isolationAuthenticity over a front Reality over escapismIdentity in Christ over our lesser selfSatisfaction over love of moneyHonoring over exploitationThis list isn’t intended to come with a pressure that you’re doing it wrong. Instead it should be considered achievements for the “completionists” to work toward. These are goals you can aim for, and that, if completed, mean you are really excelling. The concepts are based in scripture, but this shouldn’t alienate our secular audience. They’re still tried-and-true, healthy ways of living. The discussion turns to the unhealthy work culture of the Western world. Mark observes, “When do we take a moment to pause and reflect? Nobody really does that.”Overworking yourself isn’t discouraged, it’s seen as impressive and eventually leads to burnout. Instead of investing in individuals, the work world leans toward seeing people as replaceable. You must learn to recognize when your team is overworking themselves and help to diagnose why that might be happening. Mark cautions, “Be okay and unapologetic about pumping the breaks.” Artists feel lucky when their art is experienced by other people, and validation becomes their currency. It’s an unsustainable economy for creatives. Each of the listed topics above will be explored in-depth as the series continues. Resources mentioned:Sign up for the Tempus Divum newsletter A Rule of Life for Redemptive Entrepreneurs by Praxis LabsEmail us ideas, questions, or suggestions at tempusdivum@somagames.com
This post may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, Soma Games earns a small percentage from qualifying purchases at no additional cost to you, but all of our recommendations and opinions are our own. Welcome to the Soma SoulWorks Podcast! This podcast serves to help people, particularly those who may label themselves as "creatives," to seek wholeness and calling so they are ready to embrace the mission God has for them. Consider this podcast a rogue harmony of professional development and self-care, hosted by John Bergquist and Chris Skaggs.What’s covered in this episode: What are our goals with this podcast and with Soma Soulworks?“If Soma’s mission is to be apostolic, we are trying to live out and demonstrate cultural values. What does it mean to be believers in Christ in a very, just, normal world?” - Chris SkaggsThis podcast places an emphasis on processing specific issues together, rather than trying to bring answers. “If Tempus Divum is curriculum-based, Soma Soulworks is processing time,” Chris explains. “I don’t want to be the ‘answer place’, if I can just be the ‘honesty place’. That’s enough.”We hope this can be a place of connection; it can be helpful to realize there are others out there wrestling with the same things you are. Our main goal is to follow what the Holy Spirit is doing.We live on an external and internal level, Mark says. It’s easy to be known by your external life, but it’s harder to be vulnerable and to be known on an internal one. The temptation to be fake and performative is pervasive and exhausting. We need an opportunity to embrace, rather than shy away from, our internal lives.Jesus wants to meet you where you’re at. He recognized people and really saw them in what they were doing, and yet he called them to so much more and wanted to unpack where they were at, Mark observes. What kind of resources and practices are we cultivating?Weekly Jesus timesWeekend prayers and contemplationsTempus Divum (this has additional resources and questions)Resources mentioned:Sign up for the Tempus Divum newsletter Bootcamp NorthwestEmail us ideas, questions, or suggestions at tempusdivum@somagames.com
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Creator Details

Episode Count
19
Podcast Count
1
Total Airtime
11 hours, 13 minutes
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 738742