International law can actually be a very powerful tool in the regulation of warfare In 1907 the major powers of the world gathered in the Netherlands for the Second Hague Conference. Building on the agreements of the First Hague Conference of 1899 the participants noted that many warring parties were not observing the international laws agreed upon by civilized nations. Of particular concern was the forces that had continued armed resistance after defeated nations were occupied by their conquerors. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Jonathan Gumz, a Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. Jonathan joins JP Clark in the studio to discuss the attempts and failings of both Hague conventions as well as the Geneva Conventions to try and maintain civility and order in the midst of the brutality of war. Dr Jonathan E Gumz is a Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. COL JP Clark was the Deputy Director for Academic Engagement for the Strategic Studies Institute and a WAR ROOM Senior Editor as well as a student in the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Female Yezidi resistance fighters of the Êzidxan Women's Units (YJÊ), September 2015 in Sinjar Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons PanchoS
It wasn't long before the aircraft were able to fly to much greater altitudes and at greater speeds and get into an environment where humans just could not function correctly and humans became sort of the weak link or the limiting factor Anyone who watches military aviation knows that many believe the F-35 will be the last manned fighter aircraft produced by the United States. Remotely piloted aircraft have been prevalent in the battlespace for at least a decade. Many of the most routine tasks in-flight are accomplished by a machine with a pilot monitoring. But the discussion about the "man in the can" far predates any of the debates that confront us now. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Tim Schultz to discuss the limitations that were placed on aviation development by the insistence that there be a human in the cockpit. Author of The Problem with Pilots: How Physicians, Engineers, and Airpower Enthusiasts Redefined Flight, Schultz lauds the engineers and scientists along with flight surgeons for all of the advancements they were able to make in the aviation industry in spite of the human crew members on board. He joins Senior Editor JP Clark as they look back at the trade offs that have been made in aircraft design to accommodate the pilot. Dr. Timothy Schultz is the Associate Dean of Academics for Electives and Research, U.S. Naval War College and the author of The Problem with Pilots: How Physicians, Engineers, and Airpower Enthusiasts Redefined Flight. COL JP Clark was the Deputy Director for Academic Engagement for the Strategic Studies Institute and a WAR ROOM Senior Editor as well as a student in the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Members of the 128th Air Refueling Wing, Milwaukee, Wisc. prepare to land a KC-135 Stratotanker after a training exercise Nov. 3, 2013. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jenna V. Hildebrand/Released
The Army prides itself on being able to learn, but it also has shown throughout history it also forgets pretty quick too. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Brian Linn and Conrad Crane to discuss the inter-war periods throughout U.S. history and what they've meant to the further development of the U.S. Army. WAR ROOM Senior Editor JP Clark joins them to look at how post-war versus pre-war mindsets have guided leadership over time. Brian Linn is a Professor of History and the Ralph R. Thomas Professor in Liberal Arts, at Texas A&M University. He specializes in military history and war and society in the 20th century. Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. COL JP Clark is a student in the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College and a WAR ROOM Senior Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: American servicemen and women gather in front of “Rainbow Corner” Red Cross club in Paris to celebrate the conditional surrender of the Japanese on August 15, 1945. Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo
The charter was...to look at preparation of the Navy for the defense of maritime security and the coasts In the early 1900's the U.S. Navy found itself creating strategy in an ad hoc manner in the midst of modernization and calls for officer corps structure and education reform. In response the Secretary of the Navy initiated efforts which led to the creation of the Naval War College and equally as important the General Board of the Navy. The General Board was essentially the first Navy General Staff in all but name for fear of creeping Prussian militarism. John Kuehn, a professor of history at the Army Command and General Staff College, recounts the early days of the Navy's attempt to formalize strategy formulation. He and JP Clark review the formative stages of the modern U.S. Navy and the worldwide reach and structure that so many are familiar with today.   Dr. John Kuehn is a Professor of Military History at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. COL JP Clark is the Deputy Director for Academic Engagement for the Strategic Studies Institute and a WAR ROOM Senior Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: USS Baron DeKalb, an Eads class ironclad Photo Credit: U.S. Naval archives
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Episode Count
4
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1
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2 hours
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